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fGc 977.201 E56s v. 2 
Blackford aho Grant Counties 



Blackford and Grant 
Counties, Indiana 



A Chronicle of their People Past and Present With Family 
Lineage and Personal Memoirs 



Compiled Under the Editorial Supervision of 

BENJAMIN G. SHINN 



VOLUME II 



ILLUSTRATED 




THr LEfVTS FHgLlSHlNG COMPANY 
;;hicago and new york 

1914 









»,•.»•■ 




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Blackford and Grant Counties 

Alfred Pugh. One of Grant coiinty's native sons who has attained 
distinction in business circles and who ranks among the most enterpris- 
ing and progressive citizens of Upland is Alfred Pugh, notary public 
and insurance man, who is widely known in fraternal activities of the 
state. Sir. Pugh comes of "Welsh ancestry, his grandfather, Azariah 
Pugh. being an emigrant from Wales to the United States and an early 
settler in Virginia. Records of this ancestor have been lost, and little 
is known of him save that he died in Frederick county, probably in 
middle life, and that his wife likely died there. They were the parents 
of two sons and two daughters: Michael, the father of Alfred Pugh; 
Jesse, who died unmarried as a young man ; Catherine, who was married ; 
and Elizabeth, who married Jesse Trowbridge and died in Frederick 
county. Virginia. iSlS4-S 

Michael Pugh was born in that county about 1795, and there grew 
to manhood, being reared to agricultural pursuits. He was there mar- 
ried to Elizabeth Caudy, who was born in Hampshire county, Virginia 
(now "West Virginia), in 1805, daughter of James Caudy, a native of Ire- 
land, who came to the United States when young. Her mother was a 
Miss Lyon, whose father came from Ireland. They were married in Vir- 
ginia where they lived to advanced years and died in the faith of the 
Methodist church. After their marriage, Michael and Elizabeth Caudy 
removed to Guernsey county, Ohio, and there settled on a farm, but 
following the birth of their first child, James, came overland to Indiana, 
with a yoke of oxen, one horse and a covered wagon, camping by the 
roadside at night in true pioneer fashion. In 1831 they located on a 
farm in section 13, Jefferson township. Grant county, where the father 
entered 160 acres of land, and for some years thereafter was compelled 
to walk over a blazed trail through the woods all the way to Fort Wayne, 
this .iourney taking four days. On this farm ilr. Pugh made numerous 
improvements, building two log cabins and then a frame house, the latter 
of which is still standing on the old homestead and occupied by his grand- 
son. The old home farm has never gone out of the family name, but is 
kept as an inheritance. Mr. Pugh was a sturdy, industrious man, whose 
tireless industry and unbounded energy assisted him in making a success 
of his operations in the agricultural field. He stood six feet tall, was a 
man of iron nerve, and while he never saw active militaiy service at the 
front, owing to his age, was captain of a local militia company at the 
time wlien soldiers wei-e being mustered into the service. He was liberal 
in his donations to all worthy enterprises, and although he was a member 
of the IMetliodist Protestant church made a gift of the land for the 
cemetery at the Shiloh Methodist Episcopal church. He died August 
23, 1863, widely mourned throughout the community, while the mother, 
who was a charter member of the Sliiloh church, died at the old home in 
1890. They belonged to the strong old pioneer stock which faced the 
dangers of the unknown forests, where the father with his trust.y fiiut- 
iock supplied the family with game, while the mother remained at home 
and wove and spun the cloth for the clothing and blankets. Politically 
a Democrat, Mr. Pugh never cared for public office, preferring to devote 
himself to making a home for his family. To Sir. and Mrs. Pugh there 

449 



450 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

were born the following children : James, who died after his marriage to 
Nancy E. Stephens, by whom he had three children; David Wesley, who 
married jMargaret Smith, both of whom died in Grant county, leaving a 
son and daughter; Josiah, who died in Colorado, was married and had 
a family of children ; John W., who died in Upland, was twice married 
and had three children by his first union; Mahlon, deceased, who was 
married and is survived by one sou ; Branson, who died leaving a widow 
and one daughter, one daughter having previously died ; Amos, deceased, 
who left a widow and had one son who had previously died ; and Alfred, 
Sally, IMargaret and Maria Jane, all of whom died before our subject was 
born ; Arminda H., who married Joseph Horner, both now being deceased ; 
and Eliza E., who married John Needier, both being now deceased. Both 
Arminda H. and Eliza E. left children. 

Like the most of his brothers and sisters, Alfred Pugh was born on the 
old Pugh homestead in Grant county, Indiana, his natal day being ilay 
26, 3846. He grew up on the home farm, assisting his father aiid attend- 
ing the district schools and those at Hartford City, and on completing 
his education adopted the vocation of instructor and for five years taught 
school in Grant and Blackford counties, where he was widely and popu- 
larly known. Later Mr. Pugh gave up the teacher's profession to enter 
the business field, beeomirg the proprietor of a livery establishment, a 
business which he followed for six years. During the time that he was 
thus engaged he became interested in the insurance business, and after 
having engaged in this as a side line for some time determined to turn 
his entire attention thereto and accordingly disposed of his interests in 
the livery stable. He has continued to follow this line ever since, and 
the success that has rewarded his efi'orts demonstrates that he made no 
mistake when he changed vocations. It takes a peculiar talent to gain 
a full measure of prosperity in the insurance line — an ability that is 
a little different from that needed in almost any other. Strict integrity 
and honorable dealing play a large part, of course ; energy, persistence 
and enterprise are essential, and a persuasiveness and stick-to-itiveness 
that knows not the meaning of the word failure. IMr. Pugh handles 
both life and fire insurance and their various branches, represents some 
of the leading companies in the country, and has become widely known 
in the insurance field as a man who can attain results. He has also 
for some years served in the capacity of notary public. As early as 
1878 Mr. Pugh was commissioned a justice of the peace, and served until 
1882, and again in 1886 was commissioned a justice and served until 
1906^ thus occupying this office for almost a quarter of a century. He 
was the incumbent of this position when a justice had the same juris- 
diction as a justice of the peace, and through performing twenty-five 
marriages during the first year he acted in his official capacity became 
widely known as "the marrying justice." 

Mr. Pugh was himself married in 1872, in Grant county, to Miss 
Hester Miles, who was born in Jefferson township, this county, May 
13, 1852, and died February 22, 1892, daughter of Lorenzo and Phoebe 
(Wass) Miles. Her parents came from Steuben county. New York, to 
Rush county, Indiana, at an early day, and not long thereafter made 
removal to Jefferson township, Grant county, where both passed away, 
the father when about sixty years of age, and the mother in advanced 
years, she having contracted a second marriage. To Mr. and Airs. Pugh 
there were born three children: Ocie V., who resides with her father 
and keeps house for him; Malevie L., the wife of John W. Doherty, 
of Benton Harbor, Michigan, who has three chddren. Miles A., Gayvellc 
E., and May H.; and Orie Hodd, single, a well known horseman ot 
Wisner, Nebraska, who works for contractors. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 451 

IMr. Pugli is a Democrat in polities, and has been active in local and 
state affairs, having been a delegate to numerous conventions of his 
party. He is one of the best known figures in the fraternal life of Grant 
county, being past master of Upland Lodge No. 427, F. & A. M., having 
been made a Mason in 1868. He joined the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows in the following year, and is past grand and past chief patriarch 
of Shideler Lodge No. 352 and Upland Encampment No. 213. In addi- 
tion he has four times been representative to the State Masonic Grand 
Lodge, three times to the State Grand Lodge of the Odd Fellows, and 
twice to the Grand Encampment of the latter order. His friendships 
are only limited to the number of his acquaintances, not alone in frater- 
nal life, but in business, public and private circles of the city. 

Harry Williamson, M. D. Among the most popular men in Marion, 
Indiana, not only in his own profession but among people at large is 
Dr. Harry Williamson. He has the advantage of a thorough scientific 
education, long experience in his profession and a charming sympathetic 
personality that makes him a welcome guest even though he comes in 
his professional capacity. He has a large general practice and holds 
a high place in the regard of the people of Marion and Grant county. 

Dr. Hai-ry Williamson was born in Butler county, Ohio, on the 16th 
of September, 1864, the son of David and Frances (Siegrist) Williamson. 
Both of his parents were born in the state of Ohio and they are both 
. living. 

Dr. Williamson was educated in the public schools of Butler county, 
Ohio, until he was of an age to go away to school, when he was sent 
to the Central Normal College at Danville, Indiana. He received his 
medical education in the Indiana Medical College, from which he was 
graduated in 1892. He later took courses in medical work in the New 
York Polyclinic. 

The doctor first began to practice at Knightstown, Indiana, only 
remaining there a year, however, before he removed to Chicago. He 
practiced in the city for seven years, and in the boundless opportunities 
of a general city practice he had the finest of practical training. In 1900 
he came to Marion and began to practice. He has been located here 
ever since and has many warm friends throughout the city. His offices 
are located in the Marion Block and the practice which he has built up 
is now one of the largest in the city. 

The doctor is very much interested in the affairs of the various fra- 
ternal societies of which he is a member. In the Masons he is a Knight 
Templar and he is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and of the Elks. He is very fond of athletics and holds membership 
in the Country Club and in the Golf Club. 

On the 30th of November, 1892, Dr. Williamson was married to Mary 
L. Davis, of Gleuwood, Rush county, Indiana. No children have been 
born to the doctor and his wife. 

Thomas D. Barr. Practically all of the years of Thomas D. Barr's 
life have been spent in faithful service to the people, not, as a man in 
public office, alone, but as a teacher of their children, and although his 
service in his various public positions is recognized and appreciated it 
is as a teacher that he is best known and respected. He taught in the 
schools of Indiana for twenty years, accomplishing much for the cause 
of education and although his time is now filled with the duties of his 
office as deputy county auditor of Grant county, Indiana, he is still 
keenly interested in the cause of education. 

Thomas D. Barr is a descendant of one of the very first settlers in 



452 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Grant county, being a great-graudsou of Thomas Dean, who settled in 
Grant county, in Jefferson township, at a very early day. A 
was also one of the first school teachers in this section and in 18C0 was 
auditor of Grant county. Thomas D. Barr is the son of John L. and 
Elizabeth (Dean) Barr, his father being a native of Pennsylvania and 
his mother having been born in Grant county, Indiana. John L. Barr 
was a soldier throughout the Civil war, being a member of the First 
Volunteer lufantrj' of Iowa. After the war he practiced law in Missouri 
and there he died when his son was quite young. 

Thomas D. Barr was born in Saint Clair county, Missouri, on the 
18th of October, 1870, being one of two children born to his parents 
and he is now the only living child. In 1874 he returned to Grant county 
with his mother and two years later in 1876 she died, leaving him an 
orphan of just six years of age. Although deprived of his parents he 
received a good education. He first attended the public schools of the 
section and then entered Fairmount Academy. He later attended, the 
Indiana State Normal College at Terre Haute and then completed his 
education with a business course at the Indianapolis Business College. 

Mr. Barr began life as a teacher, first teaching in Grant county, in 
Monroe, Van Buren and Liberty townshii^. He also taught in other 
parts of the state. For a time he taught in Richsquare and Lewisville, 
in Henry county, Indiana. He was principal of the Van Buren, Indiana, 
high school and taught in both the Fairmount Academy and the high 
schools in Fairmount. 

Always keenly interested in public matters and in political questions, 
he took an active part in such affairs but it was not until 1906 that he 
accepted a public ofSce. At this time he was principal of the high school 
in Van Buren and he was appointed deputy sheriff, serving in the office 
over a year. He resigned this office to enter the government service as a 
meat inspector and in 1907 resigned from this position to accept that 
of deputy clerk. His love for his old profession called him back once 
more to accept a position as teacher in the Fairmount Academ.y. From 
this school he went to the high school of Fairmount biit he resigned from 
its teaching staff in 1911 to accept the office of deputy auditor of Grant 
county. He is a man full of energy and industry and has made a most 
efficient public official. During his vacations he lias worked on the news- 
papers of Marion, writing the advertisements. 

Both ilr. Barr and his wife are members of the Friends church, his 
wife being very prominent in this church. In politics Mr. Barr is a mem- 
ber of the Republican party and in fraternal affairs he belongs to the 
Ancient Free and Accepted ilasous. 

Mr. Barr was married in November, 1893, to Miss Daisj' Douglas 
Brushwiller, who was born in Jonesboro, Grant county, Indiana. Mrs. 
Barr is a grand-daughter of George Douglas, who was one of the early 
pioneers of Grant county and for seventy years was a minister of the 
Methodist church in Grant county. Mrs. Barr is a woman of rare intel- 
lectual attainments and is the pastor of the Friends church in Muucie, 
Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Barr have one son, Raymond Barr, who was 
born December 18, 1895, and is now in high school. 

Stephen G. Baldwin. A scion of one of the sterling pioneer families 
of Grant county, the late Stephen G. Baldwin here passed his entire life, 
and his exalted integrity of character, as well as his large and worthy 
achievement in connection M-ith the practical activities of life, gave him 
prestige as one of the representative citizens of his native county, M-here 
he ever held inviolable place in the confidence and high regard of his 
fellow men, so that there is all of propriety in according to his memory 
a special tribute in this publication. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 453 

Oil the old Baldwin homestead farm, situated on the banks of Deer 
creek, in Mill township, Grant county, Indiana, Stephen G. Baldwin 
was born on the 3d of August, 1850, and has passed the closing years 
of his life in the city of Marion, the judicial center and metropolis of 
the county, where he was summoned to eternal rest on the 13th of October, 
1909, — known and revered as one of the noble and loyal citizens and 
representative business men^of the county's capital city. The condi- 
tions and influences of the home farm compassed the boyhood and early 
youth of Mr. Baldwin and he thus learned the lessons of practical indus- 
try in the formative period of his life. After completing the curriculum 
of the Deer Creek district school he continued his studies in the gi-aded 
school at Jonesboro, and thus he laid a firm foundation for the broad 
and liberal education which he later gained through self-discipline and 
active association with men and affairs. He was, however, afforded also 
the advantages of the Bryant & Strattou Business College in the city 
of Indianapolis, and the training further fortified him for the responsi- 
bilities and actions of active business affairs. As a boy he had not only 
assisted in the work of the home farm but also in that of the shoemaker's 
shop maintained by his father in the village of Jonesboro. 

In 1874, at the age of twenty-four years, Mr. Baldwin established 
himself in the insurance and loan business at Marion, and in these lines 
he was one of the first in the city to build up a large and substantial 
business. In this important line of enterprise he continued, with large 
and worthy success, until his death, when he was succeeded by his only 
son, who still remains at the head of the S. G. Baldwin Insurance & 
Loan Agency, which perpetuates the name of its honored founder. 

Mr. Baldwin was a man of broad views, was generous and tolerant 
in his judgment, was loyal and progressive as a citizen, and his name 
and memory are revered by all who came within the circle of his benig- 
nant influence. Though he had no desire to enter the turbulent stream of 
practical politics, he was M'ell fortified in his views concerning matters 
of governmental and economic import and was a stanch supporter of the 
cause of the Republican party. 

He was imbued with great love for nature "in her visible forms," 
and found great pleasure in the propagation of flowers and ornamental 
shrubbery about his attractive residence premises, on South "Washington 
street, the place becoming a veritable floral bower under his effective 
labors and artistic predilections. He took vital interest in all that 
touched the progress and prosperity of his home city and county and 
was a valued member of the ^Marion Commercial Club, of which he was 
a director at the time of his death. 

On the 23d of August, 1877, was solemnized the marriage of ilr. 
Baldwin to Miss Elizabeth C. Home, who was born and reared in Grant 
county and who is a daughter of the late Dr. Samuel S. Home, Sr., of 
Jonesboro. 

Moe H. Baldwin, the only son of Stephen 6. and Elizabeth C. (Home) 
Baldwin, was born in the city of ilarion on the 19th of January, 1879, 
and is a scion of the third generation of the family in Grant county. He 
full.y profited by the advantages afforded in the public schools of his 
native city and after his high-school course he entered Hanover College, 
at Hanover, Jefferson county, after which he was matriculated in Purdue 
University, at Lafayette, aftex-ward attending the celebrated University 
' of Michigan, at Ann Arbor. 

After leaving the last mentioned institution Mr. Baldwin turned his 
attention to the illustrating and designing business. 

A few years ago he collaborated with ;M. B. Edmiston in the compila- 
tion and publication of a book of caricature of ilarion business men, 



454 BLACKFOKD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

which was entitled "Some Greater JIarion Faces," and which met with 
high commendation and which showed many admirable specimens of 
his skill as an artist. Upon the death of his honored father he succeeded 
to the insurance and loan business established by the latter, one of the 
largest and most important of the kind in the state but one that is eon-' 
ceded to take precedence of all others in Grant county. 

Mr. Baldwin is well known in his native county, where his circle of 
friends is coincident with that of his acquaintances, and he and his wife 
are prominent figures in the representative social activities of their 
home city. He pays allegiance to the Republican party, is president 
of the Mecca Club, holds membership in the Marion Country Club, and 
is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and the Benevolent & Protective 
Order of Elks. 

On the 3d of September, 1901, Mr. Baldwin wedded Miss Lela Lutz, 
daughter of the late John Lutz. 

Austin Polslet. Among the citizens of Grant county who started 
out in life facing obstacles and with many disadvantages to overcome, 
and who have prospered and now stand among the county's substantial 
men, is Austin Polslej', who has an excellent farm on section twenty-four 
of Jefferson township, and has lived there for the past forty years. 

He comes of an old Virginia family. His gi-andfather John H. Pols- 
ley was born in that state about 1800, married a Virginia girl, and some 
of their children at least were born in the state. They finally came west 
and settled in Henry county, Indiana, where they were pioneers. His 
first wife died there, leaving a large family of children, and in Henry 
county John H. Polsley married for his second wife, Phoebe Jones. 
In 185-3 he went on further west, and again became a pioneer in the 
state of Iowa, in the soiithwestern section in Page county. His death 
occurred sometime in the seventies, when more than eighty years of age, 
and he was a man of unusual intelligence and information. He had been 
a farmer most of his life, and also merchandized for many years. By his 
two wives he became the father of twenty-three children. His second 
wife passed away in Iowa, and was likewise advanced in age. 

Robert W. Polsley, father of the Grant county resident above named, 
was born in 1824, probably in Virginia, and was a child of his father's 
first marriage. He grew up in Henry county, Indiana, and learned the 
trade of carpenter and cabinet maker. When about twenty-two and 
still unmarried he came to Jefferson township in Grant county, and 
here met and married Mary Fergus. She was born in iliami county, 
Ohio, in 1832, and was a small child when her parents came to Indiana. 
Her brother is "Warren Fergus, a well known Grant county citizen, and 
a more complete account of this family in Grant county will be found 
elsewhere under the Fergus name in this volume. Mary Fergus was 
sixteen years old when she married, and her death occurred in December 
1851, at the age of nineteen. She left one child, Austin Polsley. Robert 
W. Polsley, soon afterwards, married Mrs. Josiua (Powers) Sweariugen, 
a widow of Henry Swearingen, who died leaving 'one son, Mark Swear- 
iugen, who is now married and is a prominent banker iu Mvuicie, Indiana, 
and has three children. 

Robert W. Polsley by his second marriage had one child. Mary, and 
after her birth, and when she was about six months old iu 1855, the family ^ 
moved out to Page county, Iowa, spending six weeks in going across, 
the country with team and wagon. He took up government land in 
southwestern Iowa, and started the labor required for making a home in 
a new country. His second wife died in Iowa, in 1859. A year or two 
later the war liroke out, and Robert W. Polsley enlisted with a Page 



MR. AND MRS. AUSTIN POLSLEY 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 455 

county company, but was attached to Co. F of the First Nebraska Volun- 
teer Infantry, and served for about one year. He took part in the battle 
of Shiloh, but was soon afterwards stricken with dysentery, and was 
sent to the hospital in Paducah, Kentucky, where he died during the 
summer of 1862. He left two children : one of them being Austin, by 
his first wife, and the second being Mary, the child of his second union. 

After these children were left orphans they lived with strangers 
and kinsmen, and thus their early advantages were of a motley char- 
acter, and they started in life with many disadvantages. 

When Austin Polsley was thirteen years old, he came to live with his 
grandfather, S. B. Fergus, in Grant county. At the age of nineteen 
he returned to Iowa, but on reaching his majority, again found a home 
in Grant county, and in 1873 bought his present farm of eighty acres. 
There he has lived and prospered, has improved his land in many ways, 
and has put up a fine set of farm buildings, which distinguish the place 
as one of the most valuable in that section. The large red barn and the 
good white house are conspicuous in the group of farm buildings. 

By his first marriage to Miss Adaline Scott of Guernsey county, 
Ohio, who died November 17, 1908, at the age of fifty-seven, Mr. Polsley 
had seven children: Milo J., unmarried, now lives in Oklahoma; Arvina, 
died at the age of sixteen; Orlofi" is a farmer in Blackford county, 
Indiana, and by his marriage to Lettie Kirkpatrick has one son, Wayne. 
The other children died in infancy or early childhood. Mr. Polsley after 
the death of his first wife married Jlrs. Hattie (Benson) Peele. She was 
born in ilorgan county, Indiana, July 28, 1867, a daughter of Temple S. 
and ilary (Hickman) Benson. He was a native of Ohio while the mother 
was born in Kentucky but was raised in Indiana. He moved to Shelby 
county, Indiana, in the early days, and later moved to Morgan county, 
Indiana, where they lived as prosperous farmers. Temple Benson was 
twice married, the maiden name of his first wife having been Katie Car- 
roll of Shelby county, where she died, leaving children. Mr. Benson 
afterwards married a third time, and moved from Morgan county to 
Indianapolis, where he died in 1905, having been born in 1830. During 
the Civil war he was a soldier in the Twenty-seventh Indiana Regiment. 
His widow now lives in Indianapolis. J\Irs. Polsley by her marriage 
with Tirey Peele, has a daughter, Naomi, the wife of Omer Huntzinger 
of Jetferson township. In 1900 the present Mrs. Polsley was left a widow 
with three children. In 1901 her house in Matthews burned and two 
of her children, Nina, aged sixteen months, and Merrill, aged three years, 
were burned to death. i\Ir. and Mrs. Polsley are Methodists in religious 
faith, and in polities he is an Independent Republican. His prosperity 
as a farmer may be further gauged by the fact that he is a director of 
the Matthews State Bank. 

Dr. Newton W. Hiatt. Since 1889 Dr. Newton W. Hiatt has carried 
on the practice of dentistry in Marion, Indiana. His progress in his 
chosen profession has been of steady growth and he is known to be 
one of the most capable dentists in the county, where he has lived all 
his life, and is well known accordingly. Dr. Hiatt was born in Grant 
county, on November 25, 1865, and he is the son of Alfred and Amanda 
(Thomas) Hiatt, both of whom died when he was a small child. Dr. 
Hiatt knows practicall3' nothing of the ancestry of early life of his 
parents, and beyond the fact that the father was a farmer near Roseburg, 
Grant county, where he spent his last da.ys, and that he was at one time 
a wagon manufacturer in Marion and a Quaker in his religion. Dr. Hiatt 
is unable to furnish any details concerning his parents. He was one 
of their seven children, three of whom are now living. 



456 BLACKFOED AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Dr. Hiatt was educated in the public schools of Graut county and 
in the old school at College Corner and the Mississinewa School. "When 
he had finished his schooling he went to work in a grocery stoi-e and 
for something like seven or eight years the youug man carried on his 
work in that line. It was not until 1885 that he began to study dentistry 
in the ofBce of Dr. Kiuely in Marion, and he spent three years with that 
gentleman, after which he entered the Kansas City Dental College for the 
purpose of finishing his dental studies, and in 1889 he was graduated 
from that institution. Dr. Hiatt began the practice of his profession 
in Mai'ion in April, 1889, and has since that time maiutained an office 
in the Glass building. He has gained prominence and distinctive favor 
with the public as a dentist of no slight ability, and is one of the leading 
men of his profession in, this district. 

In 1892 Dr. Hiatt was married to Miss Sadie Norcross, of Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, and they have one son, Willard Hiatt. 

Dr. Hiatt is i^rominent in fraternity affairs in Marion and is a ]Mason 
of the thirty-second degree, and Shriner as well as having membership 
in the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Tribe of Ben 
Hur. He was one of the founders of the Golf and Country Clubs of 
Marion, and is an enthusiastic and appreciative member of each of them. 
He is a man who is well versed in matters of interest pertaining to ^Marion 
and Grant county, and articles of his contribution with relation to the 
early history of Grant county are to be found in the historical section 
of this work. Dr. Hiatt and his family are prominent socially in ilarion, 
and their home is known as a center of kindly hospitality by their many 
friends in the community. 

Harley F. Hardin. In emphasizing the consistency of this publica- 
tion it is deemed most fortunate that it is possible to accord within its 
pages specific recognition to a large and thoroughly representative per- 
centage of those sterling and honored citizens who are aiding definitely 
in upholding the high standard of the bench and bar of Grant county, 
and to such consideration J\Ir. Hardin is fully entitled, as he is one 
of the able and successful practitioners of law in the city of Marion, 
the county seat, with a clientage whose prominence and importance 
affords voucher alike for his technical ability and the confidence reposed 
in him by the community. He subordinates all else to the demands of 
his profession and considers it well worthy of his closest application 
and unciualified fealty. He is a resourceful advocate and excellent 
counsellor, true to the ethical code of his exacting and responsible calling 
in which he does all in his power to conserve ecjuity and justice. His 
success has been largely due to his careful preparation of all cases pre- 
sented by him before court or jury, and he has been a member of the bar 
of Grant county since 1901. 

Mr. Hardin was born near Livonia, Washington county, Indiana, on 
the 29th of June, 1876, and is a son of Isaac A. and Susan F. (Thora- 
erson) Hardin, both representatives of honored pioneer families of the 
soiithern part of this state. The lineage of him whose name introduces 
this article is traced back to Elisha Hardin, who was a native of South 
Carolina, from which commonwealth he immigrated in an early day 
to Tennessee. His son John came from Tennessee to Indiana in 1816, 
the year which marked the admission of the state to the Union, and 
he became one of the first permanent settlers of Washington couut.v. He 
was born at Ealeigh, North Carolina, on the 12th of June, 1799, and 
thus was a youth of about seventeen j-ears when he established his home 
in the wilds of Indiana. He contributed in generous measure to the 
initial development of Washington county and the family name has 



BLACKFOED AND GRANT COUNTIES 457 

been most prominently and worthily identified with the history of that 
favored section of the Hoosier state. John Hardin was the great-grand- 
father of the representative lawyer to whom this sketch is dedicated 
and was a grandson of the founder of the Hardin family in America, 
the first representative of the line having immigrated from Scotland 
and established a home in North Carolina in the colonial epoch of our 
national history. The paternal grandparents of Harley F. Hardin were 
Andrew Jackson Hardin and Mary A. (Jones) Hardin, both of whom 
passed their entire lives in Indiana. John Hardin, the founder of the 
Indiana branch of this staunch old colonial family, was one of the most 
honored and influential citizens of Washington county in the early days. 
For many yeai'S he served as clerk of all public sales in the county, and 
he drafted the greater portion of the deeds and mortgages of the people 
of that county during the pioneer days. He was a man of superior 
education, as guaged by the standards of his time, and he did much to 
make educational provisions for the children of the pioneer community. 
Three of his sons were valiant soldiers of the Union in the Civil war 
and one of the number met his death in an engagement in Kentucky. 
Another was Captain John J. Hardin, who was an officer in an Indiana 
regiment and who is still living, his home being at Salem, Washington 
county. 

On the maternal side the great-grandmother of the subject of this 
sketch bore the maiden name of Elizabeth Ash, and she was of sturdy 
Holland Dutch lineage. Mrs. Susan F. (Thomerson) Hardin still main- 
tains her home in Washington county and is held in affectionate regard 
by all who have come within the sphere of her gentle and kindly influence, 
her devoted husband having been summoned to the life eternal in 1896, 
at the age of forty-four years, and having devoted virtually his entire 
career to agricultural pursuits, in his native county. Mrs. Susan F. 
Hardin is a daughter of Isaac and Caroline (Patton) Thomerson, the 
former of whom still resides in Washington county, having passed the 
age of four score yeai's, and the latter of whom died a number of 
years ago, she having been a representative of an old Virginia family. 
William Thomerson, grandfather of Isaac Thomerson, was a native of 
Ireland. 

Of the four children of Isaac A. and Susan F. (Thomerson) Hardin 
the eldest is Harley F., of this review; Eva L. is the wife of Emerson 
H. Hall, a representative farmer of Washington county; Edgar K. is 
in the employ of the firm of Graves & Company, general hardware, 
Salem, Ind; and Heber C. is a prosperous merchant in the village of 
Campbellsburg, Washington county, these four childi'en being scions 
of the fourth generation of the family in Indiana. 

Harley F. Hardin gained his early experiences in connection with 
the sturdy discipline of the home farm and in the meanwhile made 
good use of the advantages afforded him in the public schools of his 
native county. After the completion of his studies in the high school he 
entered, in January, 1898, the University of Indiana, at Bloomington, 
where he completed a partial course in the academic or literary depart- 
ment, after which he entered the law department, in which he was grad- 
uated as a member of the class of 1901, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws. He likewise gained concomitant admission to the bar of his 
native state, in Grant county, and the same year witnessed his admission 
to practice in the supreme court of the state and in the United States 
district court, before each of which tribunals he has pi-esented various 
eases. 

Mr. Hardin initiated the practice of his profession at Matthews, 
Grant county, on the 1st of August, 1901, and about two years later 



458 BLACKFOED AND GRANT COUNTIES 

he eame to Grant county and established himself at Fairmount, in which 
village he continued his professional labors until ilay, 1908, when he 
removed to Marion, the county seat, in which city he has since continued 
in active general practice, with a law business of substantial and essen- 
tially representative order. 

Deeply appreciative of the attractions and advantages of the thriving 
city in which he maintains his home, ilr. Hardin is liberal and pro- 
gressive in his civic attitude, and in polities he is found as a staunch 
and vigorous advocate of the principles of the Republican party. 

He is affiliated with the local organizations of the I\Iasonic fraternity. 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias and Benevolent 
Grew of Neptune, and both he aud his wife are zealous members of the 
First Christian church of Marion, in the social circles of which city they 
are distinctively popular. 

On the 15th of September, 1901, was solemnized the marriage of ilr. 
Hardin to Miss ilary E. Burgess, who like himself was born and reared 
in Washington county and who is a daughter of Henry Burgess, a well 
known aud highly esteemed citizen of that county. j\Ir. and Mrs. Hardin 
have four children, — Belva L., Esther M., Forrest F., and Frances E. 

"William C. McKinnet comes of a family that pioneered it in Grant 
county as long ago as in 1836, and since that time the family has been 
prominent in the county in many lines of enterprise, ileu of their name 
have done worthy work in the development and upbuilding of this section 
of the country and the name is one that is eminently worthy of perpetua- 
tion in a work of the character and purpose of this publication. The 
subject, as assessor of Center township and engaged in the real estate 
business as well, is perhaps one of the best known men in the community 
today, and with his familj', he is accorded the genuine esteem of the 
best citizenship of the town. 

Born in Monroe township, Grant county, Indiana, on March 12, 1854:, 
William ^IcKiuney is the son of Elias W. and Ottilia R. (Barley) 
McKinney, the father born in Miami county, near Piqua, Ohio, in 1825, 
and the mother born iu Pennsylvania about 1830. The grandparents 
of the subject were Dr. William McKinney and his good wife, Sarah 
(Scott) McKinney. The former was born in Virginia in 1784, and 
his wife was doubtless a daughter of the state of Kentucky, where she 
married her husband. Dr. IMcKinney came to Grant county in 1836 
from Ohio, and he may well be said to be one of the genuine pioneers 
of the state. He early settled in Monroe township, and there lived until 
his death in 1860, busy iu the practice of his profession in this and 
adjoining counties. He and his wife were the parents of six children 
who lived to years of maturity, all of whom are now deceased. One 
of them was Elias W. McKinney, the father of William C. He was a 
farmer all his life. He removed from ?^Ionroe township to Pleasant 
township in 1865, aud in 1870 made another move, this time settling in 
Washingtou township where he remained until 1896, when he retired 
from his farming activities and moved to ilarion. There he passed his 
remaining days, death claiming him there in 1906. 

Elias McKinney was thrice married. His first wife, the mother of 
William C, died when he was a year old, about 1855. He was one 
of the five children of his parents, two of the number dying in infancy, 
and the other two who reached mature years, but who are now deceased, 
being Mrs. Maria J. Dunn, who died in December, 1885, and Mrs. Editha 
O. Hicks, who died in 1892. The father later married Abigail J. 
Chidester, a native daughter of Grant county, and five children blessed 
this marriage as well, — two of the number being alive at this writing. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 459 

namely, Mary E. Blue, of Marion, and Susan Belle Grendelle, of Denver, 
Colorado. The second wife died in 1877 and Mr. McKinney married a 
third time in 1881, Martha Frazee of Grant county becoming his wife. 
There was no issue of this marriage. 

William C. McKinney was reared on the home farm of his father 
and received his education in the public schools of his native community. 
He lived at home on the farm until his marriage in 1879, when he with- 
drew from the immediate family circle and settled with his young wife 
on a portion of the old home place, setting up an independent household. 
He continued thus until 1891, when he moved into Marion, and this 
city has since represented him home and the scene of his principal activ- 
ities. For some two years he carried on a thi'iving business in contract- 
ing, prior to which time he was occupied as deputy city marshal for 
four years, and in 1908 he was elected assessor of Center township on 
the Republican ticket, the term of which office was lately extended by the 
state legislature from four to six years, so that he is still discharging 
the di;ties of his office. In connection with that Mr. IMcKinney carries on 
a real estate business of a more or less extensive nature, and he is on 
the whole, one of the best known business men of the community. 

He is a man who is prominent in a number of fraternal and social 
orders, among which are the Junior Order of United Mechanics, of 
which he has been secretary for the past seventeen years; he is past 
counselor of the Daughters of America of which he is a trustee ; and he 
has a membership in the Tribe of Ben Hur, in which he is past chief 
and trustee. He is a member of the Congregational church, and his 
polities are these of a stanch and active Republican. 

ilr. jMcKinuey was married on September 11, 1879, to Miss Jennie 
E. Blue, a daughter of Isaiah Blue, long a resident of Washington town- 
ship. Four children have been born to them, — of which number three 
are living. They ai*e Dora 0., Mary A. and Alice McKinney, and all 
are members of the immediate family circle as yet. The fourth born 
child died in infancy. 

Mr. and Mrs. McKinney and their daughters share alike in the general 
esteem and friendship of a goodly circle of Marion's best people, and they 
are active in social and other circles in and about the city. 

Milton Marshall. Now living retired in Upland, at a comfortable 
home on Irwin Street, which he bought in 1909 and after moving from 
his farm in section thirty-five of Monroe township, Mr. Marsliall has 
spent sixty-nine birthdays in Grant county, and is at this writing within 
a few months of threescore and ten years. His descendants and fellow 
countrymen will honor him for his service to the Union as a soldier, in 
the dark days of the Civil war, and since his return from the south he 
has been identified in a successful manner with the agricultural and 
stock raising activities of Grant county, until he recently gave over the 
strenuous endeavors of earlier years, and is now enjoying a well earned 
prosperity. 

Llilton Marshall was born on his father 's homestead in Grant county, 
May 16. 1844. He is a son of Robert and Jane Fanning Marshall. 
Robert Marshall was born on the Allegheny River in Pennsylvania, 
March 11, 1806, and died in 1905, at Carlisle in Warren county, Iowa, 
at the home of a son. While living in Pennsylvania, on September 26. 
1826. he married for his first wife, Eliza Brannon. Early in the thirties 
he came to Grant county, and his name may be found in the list of those 
who secured land direct from the government. He was an industrious 
and hardy pioneer, and the results of his labors might still be seen in 
fields from which his axe cleared off the timber and underbrush. 



460 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

His first wife, M-ho was born in Pennsylvania, February 29. 1808, 
died in Grant county in the prime of life. On November 9, 1837, Robert 
Marshall married in Monroe township, Raehael Bird, who was born 
either in Ohio or Pennsylvania, on June 20, ISli. She died August 22, 
1839, leaving one son, James, who is married and lives in Oklahoma. 
Robert Marshall by his first marriage had the following children : Apple- 
ton, deceased; Clarissa, deceased; and Adeline, the widow of Riley 
Nunu, living in Iowa. On ilay 17, 1840, Robert Marshall married Jane 
Fanning, who was born in Clinton county, Ohio, and died in ilouroe 
township, December 4, 1900. She became the mother of nine children, 
and seven are still living and all are married and have homes of their 
own, except one. 

Milton Marshall grew np on the old homestead in Monroe township, 
had about the same education as was granted to most boys in that 
community and in that time, and was but a little over seventeen years 
of age when the great war between the states was begun after Fort 
Sumter was fired upon. On September 5, 1861, he enlisted in Com- 
pany F of the Thirty-fourth Indiana Regiment, under the command of 
Colonel Steele and Captain R. B. Jones and had an unusually long 
period of military service, continuing until his honorable discharge at 
Brownsville, Texas, on February 3, 1866. He was almost constantly on 
duty, whether in camp or on the march, participated in many of the 
campaigns in the Mississippi Valley and in the far south, and among the 
major engagements in wliich he fought were those at New Madrid. Mis- 
souri, at Magnolia Courthouse, at Champion Hill and in various battles 
about Vicksburg. He escaped without wounds, and the only time he 
was in the hospital was brought about by an attack of the measles. 
About six years after his return from the south. Mr. ]\Iarshall entered 
upon his independent career of farming by the purchase of forty acres 
of land in Monroe township. While he never became one of the very 
large land holders of Grant county, Jlr. Marshall made a record of 
undeniable success, and conducted his various operations in such a way 
as to bring him steadily forward in prosperity. The original forty acres 
was increased until he owned sixty-four acres, and developed practically 
every acre and made it productive according to the highest standards 
of Grant county agi'iculture. His land was improved with a substantial 
barn, and with an excellent six-room dwelling. 

In Monroe township iu 1867, occurred the marriage of Jliltou ilar- 
shall and Mary J. Needham. Her birth occurred in Jefferson county, 
Indiana, January 2, 1841. Her parents were Lorenzo Dow and ilahala 
(Lishleiter) Needham, both of whom were born iu Indiana, in 1800. were 
married in Jefferson county, and lived on a farm there the rest of their 
lives. Her father died in October 1841, only a few months after the 
birth of ISlvs. Marshall. The mother died in 1851, so that Mrs. Marshall 
from the age of ten never knew the care and protection of parents. 3Ir. 
and Mrs. ^Marshall are the parents of seven children, namely: John, who 
lives in Upland, is married, but has no children ; Elizabeth is the wife 
of Alonzo Keen, of JMonroe township, and has two children. Donna and 
Blanch; ilelissa is the wife of Ephraim Randolph, of Bakersfield. Cali- 
fornia ; Minnie, now the wife of Samuel Seavers of Jefferson township, 
by her first marriage has one daughter May Thomason, and has two 
children by her present husband, Helen and Garland ; Emma is the wife 
of Noah B. Pearson of Upland, and their children ai-e Opal and Ruth; 
Ida is the wife of Charles Hults, a farmer of Monroe township, and they 
have two children, Letha and Berl ; Lona is the wife of Perry Seavers, 
who is now superintending the ^Marshall farm in ilonroe township, and 
they have one son, Melvin. Mr. and Mrs. Marshall are both members 
of the Quaker church and in politics he is a Republican. 



BLACKFOKD AND GRANT COUNTIES 461 

S. L. Stricler. a membership of twenty years iu the Grant county 
bar, accompanied by successful practice and prominent iu public affairs, 
has constituted Mr. Stricler one of the leaders among the present lawyers 
of Grant county. Mr. Stricler has well won all that fortune and success- 
ful positions have given him, since he began his career a poor man and 
used the resources of his individuality for every advancement to larger 
responsibility and success. 

Samuel Stricler was a native of Grant county, where he was born 
February 26, 1863, a son of Jeremiah and Mary A. (Tanquary) Stricler 
The father was a native of Maryland and a farmer by occupation who 
settled in Grant county in 1847 and lived there sixty-five years until 
his death October 15, 1912. The mother passed away November 8, 1897. 
They were the parents of six children, four of whom are now living, 
namely: ilrs. Jennie Tucker, of Converse, Miami county; John AV., of 
Oklahoma ; and James Stricler, of Grant county. 

Sir. S. L. Stricler was reared on a farm in this county and began his 
education by attending the district schools of his neighborhood. He 
had finally advanced to a point where he was given a teacher's certifi- 
cation and with that obtained a school and was to a large extent identified 
with teaching for seven j-ears. During the summer for five years he 
was engaged in farming and for the other two years worked in a general 
store at Somerset, Indiana. With the resources acquired by this work 
he finally entered the law department of the University of Michigan, and 
was graduated in June 1893. He then opened his oifice at Converse in 
Miami county, and four years later moved to Marion. Mr. Stricler was 
for five years county attorney of this county and for the past four years 
has been a member of the local board of education, being treasurer of 
the board at the present time. In 1902 he was elected a member of the 
state senate for four years, and during his terms as senator Avas author 
of a bill to re-codify the state statutes. Mr. Stricler is afSliated with 
the JMasonic Lodge and the Knights of Pythias and Elks and in politics 
is a Republican, being one of the influential men of his party in Grant 
countj'. 

On August 8, 1889, Mr. Stricler married IMiss Ina Comer, a daughter 
of L. H. and Eliza Comer of Grant county. The two children born of 
their marriage are Dahl, now twenty-two years of age, and engaged as a 
shipping clerk in the glass factory at Marion; and l\Iildred C, age 
fourteen. 

John D. Ferree. The history of any community, especially as recorded 
for the benefit of future generations, is most effectively given through 
the oftering of proper and specific definition of the careers of those who 
stand representative in the various lines of human activity in the locality 
treated. Thus it is signally pertinent that in this history of Grant 
county there be accorded definite representation to Mr. Ferree, who 
was formerly secretary of the Farmers' Trust and Savings Company, 
in the city of Marion, but now secretary and treasurer of Johnston Fur- 
niture Company, and who stands forth as one of the aggressive, liberal 
and valued business men and honored and influential citizens of his 
native county, where he is well known and commands unequivocal 
popular confidence. 

J\lr. Ferree was born on the homestead farm of the family, in Liberty 
township, this county, and the date of his nativity was August 25, 1872. 
He is a son of John and Rebecca (Harvey) Ferree, both of Avhom were 
born in North Cai-olina, where they were reared and educated and where 
their marriage was solemnized. Soon after this important event in their 
lives they came to Indiana and fii'st located in Morgan county, whence 



462 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

they came to Grant county nearly half a century ago, here passing the 
residue of their lives and commanding secure place in the contidence 
and esteem of all who knew them, Mr. Ferree having become the owner 
of an excellent farm and having become one of the representative agri- 
culturists and honored and influential citizens of Liberty township. 
They later moved to Pairmount for educational advantages offered by 
the Fairmount Academy for their children, where he and his wife died. 
Of their seven children five sons and one daughter are living. The 
parents were birthright members of the Society of Friends and they 
lived in gracious accord with the simple and noble faith of this sterling 
religious body. 

Like many another who has entered business life and attained to 
definite success and prestige thereiu, John D. Ferree gained his early 
experiences in connection with the work of the farm, and after availing 
himself of the privileges afforded by Fairmount Academy at Fairmount, 
this county, it was his good fortune to be able to continue his studies 
in Earlham College, at Richmond, Wayne county, — an admirable insti- 
tution maintained under the auspices of the Society of Friends. In 
this college he was graduated as a member of the class of 1895 and 
he received therefrom the degree of Bachelor of Science. His intention 
had been to prepare himself for the medical profession, but he was 
deflected therefrom and his success in other fields of endeavor has been 
such that he has had no reason to regret that his youthful plans were 
thus changed. After leaving college Mr. Ferree turned his attention 
to pedagogic work, and in the same he proved both successful and 
popular. For two years he held the position of principal of the public 
schools of Fairmount, this county, and in 1897 he became deputj' county 
clerk, under the administration of his elder brother, E. N. Ferree. He 
continued the valued incumbent of this important position for ten 
years, and incidentally became known to and honored by the residents 
of all parts of his native county. His long experience and sterling 
character marked him as a logical candidate for advancement to the 
office of county clerk, to which he was elected, on the Republican ticket, 
in 1907, and he gave a most effective and satisfactory administration, 
his tenure of office expiring in 1911. In January of that year he became 
one of the organizers and incorporators of the Farmers' Trust and 
Savings Company and he has been a valued factor in the development 
and upbuilding of the large and substantial business of this important 
and well ordered company, of which he was secretary from the time 
of its incorporation until June, 1913, when he incorporated the Johnston 
Furniture Company, the same having been kno^vn for years as the 
H. G. Johnston Furniture Store. He was also a director of the company. 
In all the relations of life he has fully iipborne the high prestige of 
the honored name which he bears, and he stands as one of the popular 
and representative business men of the county that has ever been his 
home. 

The stalwart allegiance which he has accorded to the Republican 
party vouches for the political faith of Mr. Ferree and he has been a 
zealous worker in the local camp of his party, in which he seiwed at one 
time as chairman of the city central committee of Marion. He is affil- 
iated with the local organizations of the Benevolent & Protective Order 
of Elks, the Knights of Pythias, the Loyal Order of Moose, and the 
Modern Woodmen of America. Mr. Ferree and his wife have an interest 
in all that tends to advance the civic welfare of the community and 
all things that make for high social and moral ideals. They have a good 
home in Marion and the same is known for its cordial and gracious 
lity. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 463 

On the 6th of July, 1898, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Ferree 
to Miss Adalene M. Heaston, of Huntington county, this state, and the 
two children of this ideal union are John Willard and Edwin H. Ferree. 

Oea E. Butz. With the exception of a comparatively brief time, 
when he was employed in a stenographic capacity just after emerging 
from the Indiana Business College at Logansport, Ora E. Butz has been 
engaged in teaching the business branches in Marion, and has for some 
time past been manager of the Marion Business College. He has proven 
his ability as an instructor and excellent success has attended his efforts 
from the start, and as one of the enterprising and ambitious young men 
of the city and one whose efforts have gained him a prominent place 
in the city, he is properly accorded some special mention in this historical 
work. 

Born in Cass county, on the home farm of his parents on March 25, 
1883, Ora E. Butz is the son of Charles H. and Jennie (Snider) Butz, 
natives of Allentown, Pennsylvania, and Cass county, respectively. The 
father made his home in Allentown until 1873, when he came to Indiana. 
He was identified with the manufacturing business, fairly successful 
in his way, but the panic of 1873 finished his prosperity and caused him 
to move from his old home to Indiana. Coming to Cass county, he 
identified himself with farming, and it was there that he met and married 
his wife. They still live on their Cass county farm, and are enjoying 
their well earned rest. They became the pai-ents of seven children, five 
of whom are yet living. One of the number was Ora E., the subject of 
this review. 

Mr. Butz attended the schools of Cass county in the vicinity of 
his home community, and on finishing the public schools, entered the 
Indiana Business College at Logansport, where he took up a thorough 
course of business study. His first work upon leaving school was in 
the office of the superintendent of the Michigan Division of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad at Logansport, and he was employed in a stenographic 
capacity. Four months of service there was followed by a period of 
nine months in a Logansport hardware store, after which he was asked 
to return to the school he had previously quitted and take up the duties 
of a teacher of shorthand. He taught stenography and bookkeeping in 
the Kokomo Business College for a year, and in 1907 was given the 
management of ilarion Business College, in addition to the manager- 
ship of the Kokomo school. In 1910, so well had he succeeded in the 
duties of manager, that the proprietor of the chain of schools appointed 
him to the post of manager of the Logansport Business College as well, 
which position he is now holding. His success in the field of business 
education is one of which he might well be proud, and he has done 
much to bring these schools up to a high standard of commercial excel- 
lence, resulting in a corresponding increase in attendance and popularity 
of the schools. 

On December 26, 1906, Mr. Butz was married to Miss Edith M. 
Fonts, daughter of Jasper and Alice Ann Fonts, both of Cass county, and 
occupants of the farm adjoining that on which Mr. Butz was reared. 
He and his wife were diildhood play fellows and school mates, and their 
union came after a lifelong acquaintance. Three children have been 
born to them, — Dortha Vernon, Tom Ellis and Catherine Alice. 

Mr. Butz is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and with his wife 
has membership in the Church of the United Brethren in ]\Iarion. 
He is a clean-cut, fine-spirited and wholesome young man who bears 
the confidence and esteem of all who share in his acquaintance, and his 
citizenship is of an order such as to place him among the Marion men 



464 BLACKFORD AND GEANT COUNTIES 

who must be reckoned with when matters of import to the best interest 
of the city are up for discussion. 

JIarion Business College. Organized in the Columbian Block, 
No. 211 South Washington street, IMarion, the Marion Business College 
began its operations in this building immediatel.y upon the completion 
of the structure. Mr. J. D. Brunner, of Lincoln, Nebraska, became 
financially interested in the school in the year 1895, and became its 
sole proprietor in 1896, from which year until 1902 he and ilrs. Brunner 
(also an experienced instructor) conducted the institution, offering the 
business subjects in botli the day and night sessions. A great many 
of the prominent business men of Marion received their business training 
under the capable instruction of Mr. and Jlrs. Brunner. 

In 1902, Mr. Charles C. Cring, of South Bend, Indiana, conceived 
the idea of a chain of schools, and being successful in interesting Jlr. 
Brunner in the pro.ieet, they incorporated under the name Indiana Busi- 
ness College. That same year they purchased the Logausport Business 
College and organized the Kokomo Business College. Their business 
prospered, and from time to time they purchased additional schools, 
so that now the Indiana Business College comprises thirteen well-estab- 
lished, well-conducted, well-attended business schools within the limits 
of the Hoosier State. The schools are known by either the title of Indiana 
Business College, or as follows: Marion Business College, ilarion; Ko- 
komo Business College, Kokomo ; Logansport Business College, Logans- 
port; iluncie Business College, I\Iuncie; Anderson Business College, 
Anderson; Columbus Business College, Columbus; Richmond Business 
College, at Richmond ; Lafayette Business College, Lafayette ; Crawfords- 
ville Business College, at Crawfordsville ; Washington Business College, 
at Washington; Newcastle Business College, at Newcastle; Vineennes 
Business College, at Vineennes; and Central Business College, at Indian- 
apolis, Indiana. 

The Clarion Business College has always employed high-class 
instructors, and maintains an up-to-date equipment. It has for years 
taught most of the bookkeepers and stenographers who have accepted 
and held positions in the city of Marion, and its standing among business 
men assures a competent graduate every chance for employment. 

The curriculum of this institution includes a careful training in the 
following subjects : Bookkeeping, Business Arithmetic, Commercial Law, 
Salesmanship, Penmanship, Spelling, Rapid Calculation, Business Cor- 
respondence, Business English, Shorthand, Typewriting, Commission. 
Manufacturing, Banking Office Practice and Stenotypy. The school 
continues to operate in the old quarters at No. 211 South Washington 
street, and is now recognized as one of the best institutions of its kind 
in the State. 

Mr. 0. E. Butz at this time is manager of the Slarion Business Col- 
lege, personal mention of his career and work being given in the 
sketch preceding this. Under his management the college has met with 
its greatest success, due in no small way to his efficient methods and fine 
executive ability. 

W.\i,TEE W. Slain. Not all the fai-ms in Grant county are owned by 
members of the old families. Among the progressive younger agricul- 
turists who have come to the county from other sections, and by their 
enterprise and thrift have laid substantial foundations for large pros- 
perity, Walter W. Slain, a hustling young farmer, with a fine reputation 
as a man and citizen, has a prominent place. JMr. Slain operates a fine 
farm of eighty acres in section twenty-five of Jet?erson township. Prac- 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 465 

tically all his land is improved, he is the tj^pe of man who allows little 
waste ground about his farm, he is rapidly transforming his acres into 
one of the most valuable and productive estates in his part of the county. 
A substantial red barn and a comfortable white house are the more im- 
portant of the building improvements. ^Ir. Slain bought his present 
farm in January, 1912, and has it well stocked v^-ith hogs and sheep. He 
also cultivates sixty acres of farm land in the same vicinity. ]\Ir. Slain 
has come into his present prosperity after a number of years as a renter 
and tenant, and has earned all he possesses. He has operated farms in 
this part of Grant county for some years, and has a reputation for pro- 
gressive and reliable methods of land management and is regarded as an 
upright citizen and thoi'oughly capable business man. J.9^ S '-- -S 

"Walter W. Slain was born in Boone county, Indiana, May 14, IF" " 
was reared and educated in Delaware county, and since 1898 has had his 
home in Grant county. His parents are John William and Elizabeth 
(Higden) Slain. His father, a native of Rush county, Indiana, was mar- 
ried in Boone county to Miss Higden, who was born there, and a few 
years later they went to Madison countj^, bought and operated a farm 
of eighty acres, and later moved toi Delaware county, where the father 
farmed until his retirement. He now lives in Gaston, and is a vigorous 
man bearing easily the weight of almost seventy years. He and his wife 
are active in the Methodist Episcopal church, and he is an official and 
served for some years as superintendent of the Sunday school. Of the 
eight children, six are living, and the family record is as follows : Etta, 
who died a young woman; Millie, who died after her marriage, leaving 
no children ; Albert, who is a farmer in Madison county, and has seven 
living children ; Walter W. ; Thomas, a mechanic, living in Elwood, and 
has two sons ; Ethel, wife of Glenn Wood, now living on a farm in Madi- 
son county, and they have three daughters; and Ira, who occupies his 
father's Madison cdunty farm, and has one son; and one child, Leonard, 
who is a nephew adopted into the family, and has always had the posi- 
tion of a son, is now a farmer in Clark county, Indiana, and has one 
son and one daughter. 

Walter W. Slain was married in Delaware count;^, to iliss Florence 
Nottingham, whose father, Rufus C. Nottingham, is * well known and 
prosperous citizen of Grant county, and his career and family are 
sketched on other pages of this Centennial history. Mr. and Mrs. Slain 
are the parents of the following children: Charles and Clifford, who 
both died in infancy; Virgil A., born March 11, 1898, and now attending 
the public schools; Roy Ormal, born January 6, 1903, and in school. 
Mr. and Jlrs. Slain are Slethodists belonging to the Pleasant Grove 
church, and in politics he is a Republican voter. 

Edwin Caldwell. When Train and Eliza (Wells) Caldwell came 
with their family from Fayette county, arriving in Grant county 
November 20, 185*6, they had two children, Edwin and Fanny Caldwell, 
and they had buried two in Fayette county, — Amanda and an infant 
that had not been christened. Another son, John W. Caldwell, was born 
in Grant county. Fanny Caldwell and the parents are buried in this 
county. The father died July 27, 1881, and the mother lived several 
years, passing away April 14, 1897. Only two sons remain of the 
family. 

Edwin Caldwell married Miss Nancy J. Carmichael, of Hope, Bar- 
tholomew county, August 19, 1877. In the spring of 1878 Mr. Edwin 
Caldwell and wife moved from the Caldwell family home in Liberty 
township to Marion, where they have lived continuously except while 
he was employed as a clerk in the war department, in Washington City, 



466 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

and also for a short time spent on the Pacific Coast. Mr. and IMrs. 
Caldwell have one son, Frank Caldwell, a student in the Marion high 
school. There were a number of prominent Southern Grant county 
families who, like the Caldwells, came from Fayette county in an early 
day, and all of them are good citizens. Mr. Caldwell went to the district 
schools near his home in Liberty township, and later to the Fairmount 
high school, and to the Summer Normal Schools in Marion. For j^ears 
he was among the progressive teachers of Grant County, where he both 
"taught" and "kept" school for fourteen years, spending four years 
of that time at "College Corner," where the Marion Normal College 
finally located when the city was extended out South Washington street. 

Mr. Caldwell is of a mathematical turn of mind, and even while teach- 
ing, he used to do a great deal of work as a bookkeeper. Now for several 
years he has been recognized as an expert accountant. He is one of 
the state field examiners, and does accounting all over Indiana as he 
finds time to leave the eitj^ local manufacturers and business corpora- 
tions employing him most of the time in auditing accounts for them. 
He has all the modern appliances, typewriting, tabulating machine, etc., 
and frequently does his work at home. Mr. Caldwell has reduced the 
business to system, and in his "pigeon holes" are kept the previous 
year 's records, so that when a call comes to audit a set of books he simply 
takes down his file, and knows just where he stands — an easy matter. 

Mr. Caldwell is frequently called upon to install the books for new 
firms and corporations, and being an excellent penman it is always 
a satisfactory service. Commercial auditing is congenial employment 
and remunerative, and while he enjoyed teaching he would not want 
to teach again. J\Ir. Caldwell is a licensed embalmer, having worked 
with the different Marion undertakers, but the w'ork of an accountant 
is more congenial to him and all his time is taken at present. The 
Caldwell family are members of the ilethodist Episcopal church, and 
Mrs. Caldwell has occupied much of her spare time with fancy lace 
patterns, having many scarfs and table covers as a result, and she dares 
not place a price on her designs — has done so frequently, and had to 
make others. Knitting is a profitable pastime. 

CoL. George W. Steele. In the present Governor of the National 
Military Home, Indiana, Grant county has one of its most distinguished 
characters, and one whose citizenship is not merely local, but national. 
Col. Steele is one of those figures who stands forth as a representative 
not of a city or state, but of a nation. However, during the greater 
portion of his long life. Grant county has been his home. He made 
splendid record as a soldier and officer in the Civil War; spent several 
years following the war in the regular army on the frontier. Became 
identified with the old pork packing industry in i\Iariou, and was one 
of the principal organizers of the First National Bank of Marion: in 
1880 began a career as congressman which continued through manj' 
years, dui-ing which he performed distinguished service for his constit- 
uency and for the nation; and had the honor of serving as the first 
governor of Oklahoma Territory. This brief outline indicates the diver- 
sity and importance of his career, and the many reasons why Grant 
county esteems him as among its foremost public characters. 

George W. Steele is a native of this state, born in Fayette county 
December 13, 1839. When he was a little more than three years of age 
his parents moved to Grant county, settling here on February 3, 1843, 
so that for more than seventy years this county has been his home. His 
parents were Asbury and Mary Louisa (Waddom) Steele, the former 
a native of Kentuckj', and the latter of Indiana. Asbury Steele was a 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 467 

lawyer by profession, and was for many years a successful member of 
the Marion bar. Soon after he had taken up his residence in this county, 
he was elected to the office of county clerk, and re-elected, resigning, 
however, to resume the law early in his second term. He was the colonel 
of the 34th Indiana Volunteers from August 2, 1861, to January 14, 
1862, when he resigned. Was a state senator. His death occurred in 
1886 ; that of fiis wife in 1870. Of their six children only two are now 
living: Colonel George W. Steele and Asbury E. Steele, axi attorney 
of Marion. 

Col. George W. Steele received his education in the common schools 
of Marion and had collegiate advantages in the Ohio Wesleyau University. 
At an early date he took up the study of law and after being admitted 
to practice, opened an office in Hartford City, this state, on April 11, 
1861. Two days later Fort Sumter was fired upon and after eight 
days in his new office he closed it and rode horse-back across country 
to Marion and enlisted in a company which was organized in this city 
for the Eighth Indiana Regiment of Infantry. He was not mustered 
into that company, however, having gotten his name upon the roll 
too late, but with others formed a nucleus for a company which was 
mustered into the Twelfth Indiana Infantry on May 2, 1861, he being 
commissioned a First Lieutenant. This regiment was stationed at 
Evansville until July 18, 1861, at which date it was ordered to Wash- 
ington in order to take part in the campaign which terminated in the 
battle of Bull Run. The regiment failed to reach the field in time to 
participate in that first great disastrous battle to the Federal army, and 
during the following winter of 1861-62 it was engaged in picket duty, 
the camp of his company being near Antietam Aqueduct, Maryland. 
In March, 1862, the Twelfth Indiana was among the advanced troops 
in the forces that drove the Rebels out of Winchester, Virginia. 

When .the stated term of service for the regiment had expired it 
returned to Indianapolis, via Washington, D. C, to be mustered out, 
and arrived in Washington the night after the first day's battle at 
Fair Oaks, Virginia, in May, 1862. The following morning's paper 
gave vivid account of the severe reverses suffered by General McClellan 
and his troops, and this news pi-oduced such an impression upon the 
regiment that it at once marched to the White House and-oft'ered its 
services without compensation, to President Lincoln. This prompt 
action in the face of great national danger was greeted with many com- 
pliments by the President, who said he believed the battle would be 
over before the regiment could reach the field, and advised the officers 
and men to return to their homes and resume their respective avoca- 
tions in life. 

In August, 1862, Col. Steele organized a company for the One Hun- 
dred and First Indiana Infantry, was elected captain, and at once with 
the regiment was transported to Newport, Kentuckj', to meet the forces 
of Bragg which were then threatening to cross the Ohio River. The 
Company took active part in the campaign which forced Generals Bragg 
and Early to countermarch. The Union Army under General Buell 
overtook the Confederate Army at Perryville in October, 1862, where 
a fierce battle, in which the One Hundred and First Indiana partici- 
pated, ended in favor of the Union cause, the Confederates under Gen- 
eral Bi-agg retreating. There were many other engagements, especially 
skirmishes in which the One Hundred and First Indiana actively par- 
ticipated, until Murfreesboro was reached, when another great battle, 
one of the greatest of the war, was fought. The Union Army, being 
victorious, remained in and near to Murfreesboro until in June, 1863. 
On February 8, 1863, the major of the regiment having resigned, although 



468 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

there were eight captains who ranked Captain Steele, he was commis- 
sioned major, on account of a petition signed by every officer of the 
regiment present, save one captain who ranked him. He has a copy of 
this petition, prizing it very liighly. Commissary supplies having to 
be brought over a long single line of railroad, harassed by the enemy, 
made foraging necessary. On one of these foraging expeditions a 
division of General Morgan's Cavalry followed a brigade commanded 
by General Hall, to which the One Hundred and First Indiana belonged. 
This regiment was thrown out to offer as much resistance as possible 
to Morgan's command, while three regiments and a battery of artillery, 
the Nineteenth Indiana, parked the loaded train they had, and took 
position. This the regiment did successfully, two companies of skir- 
mishers under the command of Major Steele performing especially active 
and efficient service, and as evidence that the regiment was where the 
most severe fighting occurred, is the fact that seven-eighths of the men 
killed and wounded belonged to the One Hundred and First Indiana. 
The enemy tried for six or seven hours to drive the brigade from its 
position, but finally withdrew, leaving a hundred and eighty dead and 
wounded on the field. 

On IMay 31, 1863, the Colonel of the regiment having resigned, 
Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Doan was commissioned Colonel and Major 
Steele Lieutenant Colonel, but on account of active service and inacces- 
sibility to mails and mustering officers, they served without mustering 
until the close of the war. 

The regiment was in all of the campaigns and battles in which the 
troops of its brigade were engaged to Chattanooga, including the battle 
of Chickamauga; at jMissionary Ridge; the ninety da.ys' campaign includ- 
ing the fall of Atlanta, all the time under fire or within hearing of 
fire, the march after Hood into Alabama ; then back to Atlanta, and to 
the Sea, through the Carolinas, the battles of Smithfield and Benton- 
ville; after the surrender of Lee's army, marching to Richmond and to 
Washington; thence by railroad and steamboats to Louisville, arriving 
the latter part of June, 1865, whence they had started the latter part 
of September, 1862. On the Campaign to the Sea, Colonel Steele was 
in charge of a battalion of foragers that for efficiency and good luck 
was not excelled by any other organized body of nearly the same strength. 

After the war he tried the grocery business, it only taking him a 
very few days to ascertain that the business was too large for him. On 
account of which he sold out and started as a " boomer ' ' in Kansas City, 
Missouri. Was surprised at the limited success he had. Returning 
to Marion, he married IMarietta E. Swayzee, a daughter of one of the 
oldest and mo.st respected families of Grant coiinty. Shortly after- 
wards he accepted a commission as First Lieutenant in the Fourteenth 
United States Infantry and was ordered to California, going to New 
York, thence to Aspinwall, now Colon, crossing the Isthmus of Panama, 
thence to San Francisco by Pacific liner, and to San Pedro, and by 
ambulance to their new home at Camp Grant, arriving within two da.ys 
of a year after the date of their marriage, where they lived for several 
moutbs in an adobe house with two small rooms, dirt floor, dirt roof, 
and canvas windows; the Apaches being so hostile it was entirely 
unsafe to go out of the camp without an escort. Colonel Steele was 
later made regimental quartermasfer ; then depot quartermaster. The 
regiment was ordered East, with headciuarters at Nashville, Tennessee, 
where a daughter, Marietta V., was born. The Indians on the Upper 
Missouri becoming troublesome, the regiment was ordered to Fort 
Randall, and thence to Fort Thompson, and after securing tranquility. 
to Fort Sedgwick as headcjuarters, the regiment scattering, some of 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 469 

the companies remainiug at this post, others going to Sidney, Fort D. A. 
Russell, Fort Fetterman, and to Laramie, where the headquarters of 
the regiment moved on account of trouble with the Sioux Indians. 
Colonel Steele was not only quartermaster of the regiment and depot 
quartermaster, but was made commissary, looking after not only the 
supplying and distribution of supplies for the troops at Laramie and 
Fetterman, but supplying nine thousand five hundred Indians with 
rations for several months. 

He resigned from the Army after ten years' service, becoming a 
successful pork packer in Marion, and he yet wonders how it happened 
that he was able to borrow all of the great amount of money that was 
necessary to run such an establishment, without being able to pay for 
the completion of the building or having a dollar of capital, obtaining 
all he needed on his checks alone. 

In 1878, having political aspirations, he made the race for nomina- 
tion to Congress on the Republican ticket. The congressional district, 
composed of Grant, JIadison, Delaware, Henry, Hancock, Shelby and 
Johnson counties, was strongly Democratic, which, the Colonel states, 
probably made it easy for him to get the endorsement of Grant county. 
The convention was held in Shelby county. Colonel Steele having gone 
to the army as a boy. and only having returned a comparatively short 
time, all of which was occupied in business, he had few acquaintances 
throughout the district. Nevertheless his Grant county friends nearly 
secured his nomination ; he only losing by a vote and a half. Colonel Gross 
defeating him. In 1879 George W. Steele, Jr., was born. In 1880, the 
district being changed to take in Grant, Howard, Miami, Wabash, "Wells, 
Adams, Jay and Blackford counties. Colonel Steele was nominated 
and elected to the Forty-seventh Congress by a plurality of 533. Was 
reelected in 1882 by a plurality of 333; again in 1884, by a plurality 
of 54, and again in 1886 by a plurality of 408. Howard county being 
taken out of the district and giving twice the plurality he had had at 
any time, caused his defeat by 400 in 1888. He was out of Congress 
for six years. He helped to organize the First National Bank of ilarion 
and became its president in 1890. During the same year, on account 
of the insistence of President Harrison, and because he did not think 
he was much of a banker, he accepted the governorship of Oklahoma 
Territory, with the distinct understanding that it was only to be a 
temporary appointment, on account of desiring to go into business. He 
found the Territory with county seats Avithout county boundaries; the 
authority of the military removed on account of the civil act organizing 
the territory. There were no other officers in the territory save the 
commissioner, and receiver of the land office and the United States 
marshal; the United States district judges and the secretary of state 
arrived shortly afterwards. County boundaries were made by the 
Governor and the only change asked was by one county, that two town- 
ships that had been given to it be added to another, hoping and expect- 
ing that the Cherokee Strip between Oklahoma and Kansas would be 
opened, when additional territory might be added to this (Stillwater) 
county. In this they were right. Enumeration of the population was 
provided for, and officers appointed, from treasurer of state to road 
supervisors and constables, the applicants for office or their friends or 
both being asked to meet the Governor at the county seats and make 
application in person. The appointment of all these officers Avas made 
inside of ten daj's, and so far as he is aware no complaint was made 
that any of them were not honest and efficient. Apportionment of the 
population was made for legislative purposes; elections held, and the 
legislature assembled to enact or adopt laws for the government of the 



470 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

territory, the apportionment being entirely satisfactory to all political 
parties and so fair that it resulted in a majority of only two in favor 
of the Republicans. The question of the location of the capital of the 
tei-ritory was one of the first that came up for consideration, and two 
Republicans from Oklahoma county agreed to give the organization to 
their rivals in consideration of their votes for the removal of the capital 
from Guthrie, the temporary seat of government, to Oklahoma City. 
This with other considerations entering into the matter before the vote 
was taken made the Governor feel it incumbent upon him to veto the 
bill, which he did, very much of course to the disappointment of not 
only the senators and members of Oklahoma County engineering the 
scheme, but to many of the good citizens of that county. Afterwards 
on account of prearraugement, the capital was voted for another county, 
and the bill again vetoed, the reasons for which being stated opening in 
the legislature by the Governor. The Capital question, however, was 
so disposed of during the incumbency of Governor Steele that it never 
gave any further trouble to the people of the territory, nor was it 
changed until after the territory became a state, when it was finally fixed 
at Oklahoma City. He found the people of the territory very poor on 
his arrival, and was able to secure from the National Treasury $44,000.00 
in money with which to buy rations ; secured competent men of unques- 
tioned integrity to expend the money, and arranged for the transporta- 
tion of the supplies to the points for distribution in the territory, without 
cost or loss to the poor people. In the fall of that year, on his assurance 
that he would do the best he could to see that wheat in kind was returned, 
if the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe and Rock Island Railroads would 
deliver it to their agents and loan it to the farmers for seed, twenty 
thousand bushels were secured, and it was retui-ned bushel for bushel. 
Thousands of people more than there were quarter-sections of land 
camped on government reservations, especially on the school lands, and 
arrangements were made by the Governor, through the Secretary of 
the Interior, for leasing these lands annually at the best price, payable 
in cash: giving preference to the lessee when future leases were to be 
made. This was the first arrangement of its kind, and resulted not 
only in giving homes to the people occupying these lands and improv- 
ing" them for the use of the territory, but many thousand dollars were 
added to the school fund. 

After remaining nineteen months as Governor, instead of five or six 
as he first expected, he resigned, coming back to ]\Iarion, in the mean- 
time being offered an important position : that of Government Director 
of the Union Pacific Railroad. Notwithstanding its good salary he felt 
like returning home. Shortly thereafter he with others purchased a 
large tract of land near Marion, and became a director in what was 
known as the Wanamaker Land Company, which did not disappear from 
the map, but only because it was all paid for. It is just now worth as 
much as it cost in 1892. 

In 1894 he was elected to the Fifty-fourth Congress and reelected 
to the Fifty-fifth, Fifty -sixth and Fifty-seventh Congresses. During his 
first term of eight years he served on the committees on military affairs, 
on pensions, and on expenditures in the War Department. During his 
last eight years he served on the committee on ways and means. Dur- 
ing this service President McKinley offered him an appointment as 
brigadier general in the Spanish-American War, which he had to decline 
because he had gone to the President in the interest of another gentle- 
man, whom the President could not favor. 

In 1888 while a member of the Fifty-seventh Congress, notwithstand- 
ing it was Democratic, he introduced and secured the passage of a bill 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 471 

establishing a National Soldiers Home in Grant county, Indiana, the 
smallest limit of territory that, up to that time, had been thought of in 
the establishment of such great institutions. The bill was approved 
by President Cleveland. ' For fourteen years while Governor of Okla- 
homa and while Member of Congress, and subsequent to that time, he 
was a member of the Board of IManagers of the National Home for 
Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, and for the last nine j^ears has been Gov- 
ernor of the Marion Branch. 

There are two children: the daughter, Marietta V., is married and 
now living in Indianapolis ; and a son, George W. Steele, Jr., a lieutenant 
commander in the United States Navy, who has recently performed such 
service as to prompt the Admiral of the Pacitic Squadron and the Secre- 
tary of the Navy to have recorded official mention and commendation 
of it. 

Ellsworth Harvey. The son of an honored pioneer family of 
Indiana, Ellsworth Harvey is recognized among the representative busi- 
ness men of his native county and he has long been a resident of Marion, 
where he holds the position of cashier of the Marion National Bank, one 
of the most solidly established financial institutions of the county. Mr. 
Harvey has made his way in the world unaided by outside influences, 
but rather through the application of his native ability and inherent 
character, so that he today enjoys a pleasing place in the city of his 
residence. 

Born on a farm in Franklin township, six miles southwest of the city 
of Marion, in Grant county, Ellsworth Harvey claims November 22, 
1863, as his natal day, and he is a son of Sidney and Jane L. (Thomas) 
Harvey. The father was born in ilorgan county, Indiana, and the mother 
in Grant county, where her parents were early settlers in the pioneer 
days, the family having been conspicuously identified with the growth 
and development of the county. The father, Sidney Harvey, devoted 
himself to the farming industry, and he was successful and prosperous 
in his chosen work. Today he is reckoned among the most venerable 
and honored pioneer citizens of the county, where he is living practically 
retired from active business, enjoying a well earned rest after long 
years of strenuous life on the farm. 

He was a boy of about nine years when his father, "William Harvey, 
came to Grant county and settled upon a tract of wild land some three 
miles west of the present village of Fairmount, and there he finally 
evolved a productive farm from his wilderness land. He was of English 
ancestry, and the family is one that had its foundation in America in 
early colonial days. Bom in North Carolina and there reared, "William 
Harvey cmne as a young man to Clinton county, Ohio, removing to 
Indiana in an early day. He passed the last years of his life iu Grant 
county, and was known and esteemed as one of the solid men of the 
agricultural industry in the county. It was on his place that Sidney 
Harvey, his son, was reared to maturity, but for more than forty years 
past he has maintained his home on his own place of one hundred acres, 
six and a half miles from Marion. Mr. Harvey is a man of considerable 
influence in his community, taking a genuine interest in the political and 
civic activities of the township and count}% and he at one time served 
as county assessor. A Republican in his politics, he gives his support 
to that party, and with his wife has membership in the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Of their children, Alviu and Minerva are deceased ; 
Ellswoi'th, of this review, was the third born; Roscoe C. is a farmer in 
Franklin township ; and Gulie Elraa is the wife of H. P. Cline, a farmer 
residing in the vicinity of Junesboro, Grant county. 



472 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Ellsworth Harvey was reared to farm life and in the home of his 
parents he early learned lessons of practical import that have stood 
him in excellent stead in the more mature j'ears of his life. He attended 
the district schools, continuing his studies there for eight years. There- 
after he was a teacher in Fairmount Academy for one year. 

In August, 1893, ]Mr. Harvey was appointed to the post of deputy 
county treasurer, and the long period in which he held this office indi- 
cates something of the character of his services. He continued to serve 
in his capacity as deputy until January 1, 1901, when he assumed the 
duties of county treasurer, to which office he had been elected on the 
Republican ticket in the preceding autumn. His service here was like- 
wise a praiseworthy one, sufSeienth' so as to gain to him his re-election 
in 1902, so that he served two full terms as county treasurer, administer- 
ing the fiscal affairs of the county in a highly creditable manner. 

Soon after his retirement from the office of county treasurer I\Ir. 
Harvey was chosen assistant cashier of the JIarion National Bank, and 
here again the character of his services was such as to merit recognitiou. 
which came in the form of his advancement to the post of cashier, in 
February, 1911. He has since that time continued in the office, with 
all of satisfaction to the directors of the institution and with credit 
to himself. 

]Mr. Harvey has, like his father, been a stanch Republican since he 
came to years of maturity, and with his wife he is a member of the 
Society of Friends. His fraternal connections are with the Knights of 
Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Tribe of Ben Hur. 
He is the owner of a small but well improved farm in Franklin town- 
ship, which claims a share in his attention. 

On September 6, 1899. Mr. Harvey was married to Miss Susan Emma 
Higgs, of Richmond. WajTie county, this state, where she was born and 
reared, and where her family has been long and favorably known to 
the public. Her parents are Robert and Eliza Higgs, both of whom 
were born in England. Mr. and Mrs. Harvey have two children — 
Robert Sidney, born on November 8, 1902, and Mildred Elizabeth, born 
May 25, 1906. 

John AV. Williams. The history of the village of Upland will always 
commemorate the Williams family, since it was a man of that name who 
owned much of the land where the village now stands who laid out the 
plat on some of his acreage, donated ground for the railroad station, and 
in many other ways took the part of a leader in establishing and develop- 
ing that center of trade and population. Mr. John W. Williams, a son 
of the pioneer at Upland, has for many years devoted himself to farming 
and stock raising, and his home place in section eight of Jeft'erson town- 
ship probably has no superior in its facilities, not only as a home, but 
as a place of business, his business being the raising of high-grade live 
stock, at which he has made a big reputation, not only in his community, 
but in this and adjoining counties. 

Mr. Williams comes of Scotch ancestry, and his grandfather Isaac 
Williams was of an early settled family in central Ohio. He married a 
Miss Pierce, and they lived in Greene county, Ohio, where James L. 
Williams was born November 23. 1826. James L. Williams in 1829 lost 
his father by death, and his mother subsequently man-ied Samuel Staf- 
ford. During the forties all the families came to Grant county, settling 
on Walnut Creek in Center township, where ]Mrs. Statford died when 
eighty years of age. i\Ir. Stafford married again and died in Center 
township, at the advanced age of ninety. By his first wife he had a son 
and daughter. James L. Williams was the oldest of his mother's chil- 




HOME OF ilR. AND MRS. JOHN W. WILLIAMS AND FAMILY 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 473 

dren, and the others in the Williams family were : Thomas, who lives 
with his children at Marion ; Mary, widow of Israel Lucas, and she lives 
two miles east of the Soldiers' Home at Marion; Ortha, died after her 
marriage to Samuel Adamson, and left two sons and four daughters. 

James L. "Williams was reared after the death of his father by his 
mother and also in the home of an uncle, and on becoming of age was 
married in Green county, Ohio, to Miss Nancy Chance. She was born 
in North Cai-olina in JanuarJ^ 1831, and when fifteen years old left her 
home and people, joined a family making the journey to Ohio, and 
walked practically all the way to Green county, where soon afterwards 
she met and married James L. Williams. In 1850 they came to Indiana, 
where Mr. Williams bought one hundred and sixty acres of land in sec- 
tion three of Jefferson township. A portion of the village of Upland 
now stands on that land. When the Pennsylvania Railroad was built 
through this part of the county, Mr. Williams gave six acres for the vil- 
lage site, and three other parties gave enough to make twenty-one acres 
altogether. It was on that home that James L. Williams and wife lived 
for many years, but finally sold and bought a farm near Bluffton in 
Wells county, and his death occurred at Rockford, in that county, July 
12, 1910. His widow passed away August 13, 1913. Both were birth- 
right members of the Friends church. James L. Wilson did a great 
deal of building at Upland, and by his own effort gave that community 
a start which has continued until the present time. He was a strong 
Republican in polities. The family of children were as follows: Isaac, 
who died when eight years old ; Rev. Thomas lived in California, and his 
children are Alvin, Iva, and Rev. Charles, the church affiliations of this 
family being the United Brethren ; John W. comes next ; Cyrus lives in 
Huntington county, Indiana, on a farm, has been twice married, and has 
a daughter by his last union ; Anna is the wife of Marion Bedwell, and 
they live on a part of the old homestead at Upland. 

It was a distinction of John W. Williams to have been born in a log 
cabin, at the site of Upland, on November 28, 1857. At that time a log 
cabin home did not indicate poverty of resources, and many of the best 
families of Indiana were still living in houses no better than the one in 
which Mr. Williams was born. He lived at home until of age, was edu- 
cated in the local schools, and from youth up has made farming his 
regular vocation. For the past twenty years he has been identified with 
the vicinity of Jefferson township on the west bank of the Mississinewa 
River, where on April 28, 1893, he bought eighty acres of land in section 
eight. In 1908 ilr. Williams put a fine bank barn, with ground dimen- 
sions of fifty by ninety-seven feet, with a concrete basement, and the 
entire building is light, sanitary, and with facilities that afford conven- 
ience to the farmer, and tend to increase tlie general value of the farm 
output. Close to the barn is a concrete silo of eighty-ton capacity, and 
there are facilities for the storing of one hundred tons of hay, many tons 
of straw, and thousands of bushels of grain. The barn is one of the best 
in this entire section. It is painted a drab color, with red trimmings. 
Adjoining his main farm, Mr. Williams has one hundred and four acres, 
purchased about the same time he bought the eighty acres, and that land 
is improved with a full set of farm buildings. On another section he 
has forty acres. The homestead is improved with a substantial white 
frame house. jMr. Williams has made his reputation as a farmer, largely 
through the raising of fine short horn cattle, Poland china hogs, and 
Norman horses 

Mr. Williams by his first marriage became the husband of Martha B. 
Brumfield, a daughter of Jacob Brumfield. She was born in j\Iiami 
county, Indiana, December 9, 1858, and died at her home in Jefferson 



474 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

towiiship, April 24, 1902. She came to Graut county when a child, and 
was reared in the township where the rest of her life was spent. Her 
children were Carlos A., who lives in Matthews, and has one son, Ken- 
neth ; Goldy is the wife of Arthur Luusford, and they have a daughter 
Elma. Olive is the wife of Ernest Haj'ues, of iluncie, and they have 
two children, Virgil and Daniel C ; Myrtle is the wife of Emory C. 
Tripp, of Greentown, Howard county, Indiana, and they have no chil- 
dren. For his second wife Mr. Williams was married in Blackford 
county to Nenah Baker, who was born in that county, and reared and 
educated there, a daughter of William and Sarah (Blankenbaker) Baker, 
who live on a farm east of Hartford City, her father being sixty-two 
and her mother fifty-six years of age. The Bakers are active members 
of the Friends church. Mr. and Mrs. Williams have three children; 
Oris, aged six years, and in the public schools ; Leora, aged four years ; 
and Donald, aged two. Mr. and ilrs. Williams are members of the 
Quaker church, and in polities he is a Prohibitionist. 

Lewis P. Cubbebley. Among the business citizens of Marion whose 
connection with live, growing enterprises has given them deservedly 
high positions in their communities, Lewis P. Cubberley is worthj^ of 
more than passing mention in a work of this nature. A native son 
of this prosperous city, he has traveled extensively in various parts of 
the country during his career, and although he has been engaged in 
business in Marion since 1901, is still a representative of outside con- 
cerns, in the interests of which he makes a trip through the West twice 
a year. Mr. Cubberlej' was born in Marion, Indiana, Febi-uary 3, 1852, 
and is a son of Dr. David P. and Charlotte M. (Frazier) Cubberley. 

David P. Cubberley was born in Licking county, Ohio, and came 
to Grant county during the early forties, here becoming the first dental 
practitioner in the city of Marion, where he was engaged in an exten- 
sive and representative practice up to his death in 1884, when he was 
the oldest dentist in Gi'ant county. During the Civil War he enlisted 
for service iu the Union army as captain of a company in the Twelfth 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and spent three years on southern battle- 
fields. For years he was connected with the Masonic fraternity, and 
for a long period was secretary of his Blue Lodge at Marion. Dr. Cub- 
berley married Charlotte M. Frazier, daughter of Nathan W. Frazier, 
a pioneer and influential citizen of Grant county, and she survived him 
until 1888, having been the mother of four children : Lewis P. ; Nathan 
S., who is deceased; and Mrs. Emma C. Hutchinson and Mrs. Belle C. 
Tukey, both of whom reside in Marion. 

Lewis P. Cubberley received his early education in the public schools 
of Marion. When eighteen years of age he entered the railroad mail 
service, in which he continued to be employed until 1880, and during 
this time operated between Toledo and St. Louis, on the Toledo, St. 
Louis & Western Railroad, and the Wabash and Pennsylvania fast 
mails. On leaving the mail service, Mr. Cubberley accepted a position 
with Huestes & Hamilton, wholesale grocers of Fort Waj-ne, Indiana, 
and remained with this concern until 1888, when he entered the employ 
of the Wilson & JlcCally Tobacco Company, of Middletown, Ohio, con- 
tinning with that firm for ten years and then accepting a position as 
traveling representative for the H. W. Spurr Coffee Company, of Boston 
and Kansas City, a company with which he has since been identified. 
In 1900 he returned to Marion and established himself in a wholesale 
and retail cigar business, a venture which has proved a decidede success 
and has enjoyed a healthy and continued growth. The various brands 
handled by ilr. Cubberley have attained a high degree of popularity 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 475 

and now meet with a steady demand in every place in this section of 
the State where cigars are sold. From modest beginnings, Mr. Cub- 
berley has built up a flourishing enterprise, and his success may be 
accredited solely to his own efforts, his strict attention to business and 
the honorable manner in which he has carried on his transactions. 

On September 6, 1905, Mr. Cubberley was united in marriage with 
Miss Nellie Cook of Toledo, Ohio, daughter of J. D. and Eliza (McClure) 
Cook, pioneer residents of Grant county. Mr. Cook, a contractor in 
construction work, was widely known in his field of endeavor, being 
the builder of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad, and attained dis- 
tinction as the constructor of the only large work in the citj' of Gal- 
veston, Texas, which withstood the ravages of the devastating flood of 
1900. Mr. and Mrs. Cubberley have had no children. He is a Republi- 
can in his political views, but has taken only a good citizen's interest 
in public affairs. Like his father, he has become prominent in fra- 
ternal circles, being a thirty-second degree Mason and a member of the 
Elks, in both of which orders he has numerous friends. 

Mark L. Swayzee. One of the most progressive men of affairs in 
the city of Marion, Indiana, is Mark L. Swayzee. He has handled all 
of his business affairs along the most modern and up-to-date lines and 
his success is due largely to the methods he has emploj^ed in building 
up his business. He is the founder and proprietor of one of the largest 
retail groceries in the northern part of the state, and is also connected 
with other business ventures. He comes of a family for many years 
honored in the business and industrial world of this community and in 
his success he is only carrying forward the traditions of the family. 

Mark L. Swayzee is the son of Aaron C. and Minerva A. (Hodge) 
Swayzee, both of whom are now dead. Aaron C. Swayzee was born in 
the state of New Jersey, but migrated from there to Lancaster, Fair- 
field count.y, Ohio, and after living there for a time came to Grant county, 
Indiana. He located here in 1836 and was consequently one of the 
pioneers of this section. By trade he was a shoemaker and shortly after 
coming to Grant county he entei'ed the manufactui'ing business as a 
manufacturer of boots and shoes. For many years thereafter he con- 
ducted a retail store in the city of Marion and became actively identified 
with the growth and development of the city. He was recognized as a 
leader, not only in the business world, but also in the political and civic 
life of the city. In 187-1 he was elected a representative to the state 
legislature from Grant and Blackfoi'd counties, and proved an able 
spokesman for his people. He was always active in church affairs, 
being a member of the Methodist church and for many years a member 
of the official board of this church. He died in 1878 and his widow 
died in 1890. They were the parents of seven children, two of whom 
died in infancy. The other children are James W. Swayzee, of Pada- 
gonia, Arizona; Mrs.- W. C. Harrington, of St. Helena, California; 
Frank C. Swayzee, of Washington, D. C. ; and Mrs. George W. Steele, 
of Marion. 

Mark L. Swayzee was born in the city of Marion on the 5th of Sep- 
tember, 1864. He received his education in the public schools of his 
native town and in the ]\Iiami Commercial College at Dayton, Ohio. It 
was in 1883 that he began his business career as an employee in Sweet- 
ser's Bank, which has since become the First National Bank, of Marion 
He was thus employed for seven years, gaining a valuable knowledge of 
financial affairs and of the ways of the business world. He then went 
into business for himself, being engaged in specialty milling for five 
years. He then established Swaj'zee's Market, which has been mentioned 



476 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

as being one of tlie largest retail grocery and market houses in the 
northern part of the state. He is also engaged in the feed and milling 
business on Second street and has made a success of this enterprise also. 

In fraternal affairs ]\Ii'. Swayzee has always been deeplj' interested 
and holds a membership in many societies among them being the i\Iasons, 
Elks and Knights of Pythias. He is also a member of the Country Club. 
In politics he is a member of the Republican party and has taken quite 
a prominent part in political affairs. He was the last town clerk and 
treasurer and the first city treasurer after the incorporation of the city, 
and he is always ready to give his time and service to any movement that 
may be conducive to the welfare of the city of Marion. 

Mr. Swayzee was married on the 25th of May, 1889, to Eugenia 
Richards, a daughter of L. Y. Richards of Napoleon, Ohio, and they have 
become the parents of two children, Mark Richard Swayzee and I\Iary 
Louise Swayzee. 

John A. Rhue. There is special reason for congratulations upon a 
career like that of Mr. Rhue, the vice president of the Marion National 
Bank. Beginning his career in service with the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company, as assistant agent, some fifteen years ago he went into a bank 
in Greenfield, this state, as a messenger and general utility man. He 
had only his own record to recommend him for advancement, and yet 
he displayed such ability that in a few years he became cashier of the 
institution which he had entered as messenger. He received what might 
be regarded as a distinct j^romotion when he was appointed state bank 
examiner, and from that position became vice president of the Marion 
National Bank. Mr. Rhue is still a young man, in his thirties, and yet 
has achieved a position which would be creditable to a man older in 
years and experience. 

John A. Rhue was born in Hancock county, Indiana, December 28, 
1876, a son of A. N. and Rosa (Barrett) Rhue, both of whom were 
natives of Hancock county, and now living near Greenfield, that county. 
The father was for some twenty years a successful school-teacher, and 
is now engaged in the grain business. Of the three children, John A. 
is the only one now living. 

Born on a farm in Hancock county, and educated in the district 
schools and in the Greenfield high school, John A. Rhue began his career 
as above stated with the Pennsylvania Railroad, and spent two years in 
the service of the same. He then received appointment as a cadet in 
the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, where he remained for 
two years. On returning from Annapolis, he took the temporary 
management of the Western Union town office at Greenfield, having 
incidentally picked up telegraphy Avhile with the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company. Then in 1897 he entered the employ of the Greenfield Bank- 
ing Company, and ran errands, made collections and assorted checks and 
all other duties that were required of him. Mr. Rhue remained with that' 
banking institution for twelve years, and enjoyed many promotions up to 
the responsible post of cashier. As a skillful manager of banking busi- 
ness, his reputation had extended beyond the confines of his home com- 
munity, and in 1909, without any solicitation on his part he was invited 
to become a state bank examiner, and was assigned to the Northern 
Indiana Tei'ritory. His work in this connection brought him into 
association with all the state bank association officers in Northern 
Indiana, and as result of this acquaintance and high regard he received 
another invitation in April, 1911, this time to become vice president of 
the Marion National Bank, a post which he accepted and which he has 
since filled. In one phase his experience as a banker is proliably 






f 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 477 

unique. He still held his place of cashier in the Greenfield bank, during 
his term as state bank examiner, and had already accepted and been 
formally installed as vice president of the Marion National Bank before 
severing his relations with the Greenfield Banking Company and with 
the State Banking Department, so that for a short time he held all 
three posts. Mr. Rhue has been a resident of Marion since July, 1911. 
He owns a fine farm of one hundred acres situated a mile from Green- 
field in Hancock county, and the management of this estate is his chief 
recreation and pleasure aside from business. He is also interested as an 
investor in various other undertakings. 

Ml-. Rhue is a lover of music, and during his residence at Greenfield 
was for twelve years connected with the Home Orchestra at that place. 
On September 22, 1908, he married Miss Mary Todd, of Bluft'ton, a 
daughter of Hon. J. J. and Mary (Studebaker) Todd, one of the best 
knowii families of the state. J. J. Todd, her father, was formerly grand 
master of the Masonic order in Indiana. The two children of Mr. Rhue 
and wife are Mary, born August 13, 1909, and Jane, born August 9, 
1910. 

JMr. Rhue is himself prominent in Indiana Masonry, having passed 
through all the degrees of the York Rite at Greenfield, including the 
Lodge, Chapter and Commandery, and having attained thii-ty-two 
degrees of the Scottish Rite and being affiliated with the Mystic Shrine 
at Indianapolis. He has served as Master of his Lodge, high-priest of 
the Chapter and eminent commander of the Commandery, besides 
having been worthy patron of the Eastern Star. Mr. Rhue is a member 
of the Marion Golf Club, is a Republican in politics, and he and his 
family belong to the Methodist church in Marion. 

Allen C. Tudor. The breeding of thoroughbred Belgian and Per- 
cheron horses has been developed to an important industry by Mr. Tudor 
at LTpland, where he has his farm and stables, and all the facilities for 
successful management of this interesting and profitable branch of the 
live stock industry. At the head of his stables, is the Belgian stallion 
Noirhat Damier now seven years old and imported from abroad in 1908. 
This horse took the second premium at the International Stock Show 
in Chicago. He weighs 2,060 pounds. Mr. Tudor also owns Jaddus, 
a Norman stallion imported in 1912, and which has already made a fine 
record as a breeder. Jaddus is a four-year old, and weighs 1,800 pounds. 
Another imported horse found at the Tudor place is Taupin, which has 
been in service several years, is favored by a large number of farmers in 
this section of the state, and the general average of his colts is perhaps 
as high as can be credited to any other breeding stallion in this country. 
As a background to his breeding stables, Mr. Tudor owns a fine little 
farm of forty aci-es, adjoining the village of Upland. He purchased 
and located there in 1912, moving fi-om Monroe township, where for a 
number of years he had been engaged in the same line of business. 

Allen C. Tudor was born in Fayette county, Ohio. November 6, 1868. 
His father was William Tndor and his grandfather Stephen Tudor, the 
latter a native of Pennsylvania and the former of Ohio. The grand- 
father died in Oliio, and AVilliam Tudor died in Grant county in Decem- 
ber 1910, at the age of seventy-one j^ears. William married IMargaret 
Pierce, who died aged thirty-two in 1874 in Grant county. They settled 
in Grant county not long after the birth of their son Allen who was 
reared and educated here. He was the second in a family of four sons, 
and two daughters, all of whom are living and are married. After 
leaving school he identified himself with agriculture, and his influence 
soon led him to specialize in live stock, and for a number of yeai-s he has 
had a successful experience in the breeding of horses. 



478 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

In 1900 at Upland, Mr. Tudor married Miss Mary Mariah Thomas, 
who was boru and reared in Decatur county, Indiana, a daughter of 
Edward Thomas, who died in Ohio, but whose widow now lives in Boone 
county, Indiana. j\Ir. and ilrs. Tudor have the following children: 
Pearl, Lucy, William, Opal and Orris. 

Thomas Diggs Thorp is a native son of Grant county and a citizen 
of excellent standing in this part of the state. His life in this county 
has been a widely useful one, and he has filled prominent places in 
public life during the years of his active career. In educational matters 
he was ever foremost, and he practiced law for some years in this 
county, but the great vi^ork of his life has been in the ministry of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, in which he was prominent for many 
years. 

The parents of Thomas D. Thorp Avere Rev. Alfred and Becca (^Moor- 
man) Thorp, both natives of North Carolina. The father and mother 
came to Indiana when children, locating first in Wayne couuty and 
coming on to Grant county in about 1832, when he settled on the farm 
which became the family homestead, and which is still in possession of 
the family, or rather is now owned by the youngest sister of Mr. Thorp 
of this review. 

Rev. Alfred Thorp was a minister of the Wesleyan church and he 
organized the first Methodist Episcopal church in this vicinity, in which 
he was a preacher at the time of his death. He lived on his farm all 
his life, and to him and his wife were born ten children, four of whom 
are living today. They are briefly mentioned as follows: Mrs. Julia 
Ann Brookshire, now a resident of Pasadena, California; Mrs. Ursula 
Double Tuttle, of Fairmount, Indiana ; Mrs. Mary P. Buruier, of Grant 
county ; and Thomas D. Thorp, of this review. The mother of these was 
a daughter of the Moorman family, as has already been mentioned, but 
she was closely connected with the Diggs family, famous in English 
history, representatives of which came to the colonies and came to be 
known among the First Families of Virginia. The family was prominent 
in the history of the Old Dominion for more than a century. Rev. 
Thorp died in 1848, his widow surviving him until 1891. 

Thomas D. Thorp received his education in the old Grant County 
Seminary and at Asbury (now DePauw) University, at Greeneastle, 
Indiana, until his sophomore year, when he went to the Indiana State 
University at Bloomington, from which institution he was graduated. 
He taught school in Grant county for a number of years and for a 
brief time was engaged in the practice of law, after which he was for 
nine years county superintendent of schools. He is credited with the 
work of grading the country schools in the state of Indiana, a most 
advantageous step in rural education, as has been well proven since the 
work went into effect. Mr. Thorp then entered the ministr.y of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and in the business of the church he was 
engaged for many years thereafter. He is now retired, however, and 
gives his entire attention to the care of his large property interests. 

Mr. Thorp is a veteran of the Civil war, in which he served under 
General George Wagner, with the rank of Second Lieutenant, in the 
Army of the Cumberland. He saw a deal of active service during the 
term of his service, participating in the battle of Pittsburg, at Perrys- 
ville, and other equally important engagements. For fourteen years 
after the war his church work was confined to his superintendency of 
the Methodist Episcopal Sunday school, but he then went into the 
ministry as a graduate of a theological school, continuing for many 
years, as has already been outlined. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 479 

Mr. Thorp married Miss Alice Shattuek, of Delaware, Ohio, a 
graduate of the Ohio Wesle3'an University, and to them has been born 
one son, Paul D. Thorp, who was recently graduated as a member of 
the class of 1913 in the Ohio Wesleyan University. He is a baritone 
singer of ability and promise, and has been manager of the Varsity 
Quartette for two years, and now goes to Ohio State University to 
continue his law and study journalism. He is now reading law, pre- 
paratory to a career in the legal profession. He is a member of the 
Phi Delta Theta, of which fraternity his father, Thomas D. Thorp, was 
also a member in his college days, and still is. 

Mr. Thorp, it is safe to say, is one of the halest men in these parts. 
He comes of a family that is especially long-lived, his mother's family 
being one noted for its longevity, Avhile his father had an uncle who 
lived to the patriarchial age of one hundred and seven years, and at the 
time of his death was seemingly hale and hearty, being engaged in 
hoeing in his garden but a short time before he passed away. On his 
mother's side, the Diggs family is one of the oldest in America today, 
her ancestry being traced directly down from 1583 in England, to their 
settlement in Virginia in about 1615, and the latei' settlement of the 
family in its various branches in North Carolina. The history of the 
family is an interesting one, but lack of space makes further mention 
thereof impracticable at this point. 

Alva Johnson. Among the younger of the business men of JMarion, 
Indiana, none is better known for his energy and progressive ideas, as 
well as the practical ability to carry them out, than Alva Johnson. Not 
yet turned thirty, Mr. Johnson is a member of the well known fii-m of 
J. Winters and Company, and is rapidly forging to the front as a real 
estate man. Although he has resided in Marion only a short time he has 
won a large measure of popularity and has taken an active part in the 
varied interests of the city. 

Alva Johnson was born in Jetfersou township, near Upland, Grant 
county, Indiana, on the 30th of April, 1885. He is a son of James Noah 
Johnson and Bell (Connelly) Johnson. The father was born in Jefferson 
parish, Grant county, and the mother in Wayne county, Indiana. The 
father was a son of James and Elizabeth Johnson who came into 
Indiana from Guernsey county, Ohio, and settled on the place that has 
since become known as the Johnson homestead in Jefferson township. 
This was in 1843 and here James Johnson lived until his death on 
December 1, 1910. James and Elizabeth Johnson had eight children, 
only four of whom grew to maturity, as follows: John, who died at 
thirty -five ; Solomon, of Jonesboro, Indiana ; James Noah, who died in 
1893, and Emma, who lives in Jefferson township. Grant county. James 
Noah Johnson lived on his father's farm until about the time of his 
wife's death in 1890. He then engaged in the banking business, first 
working in a bank in Pairmount for a year and then he organized the 
Upland Bank, his father, James Johnson, being president, and he him- 
self, cashier. James Noah Johnson and his wife had three children, 
Bertha, who is the wife of Charles H. Snyder, of Upland ; Alva Johnson 
and his twin sister, Elva, who married Charles F. Marley, of Upland. 

The father died in 1893 and the three children M'ent to live with 
their grandfather, making their home with him until his death at the 
age of eight.y-nine. At his death these three children each inherited 
560 acres of valuable land. For six months previous to his death the 
venerable old man had been blind, and his two granddaughters took 
the tenderest of care of him. 

Alva Johnson was educated in Grant county, first attending the 



480 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

township school in Jefferson township, from which he was graduated 
in 1900, and then becoming a student in the Upland high school. He 
was graduated from the latter in 1904, and until 1911 he lived on the 
farm. During that year he removed to Faii-mount, and on December 
27, 1912, his home and entire property there was destroyed by fire, in 
consequence of which he determined to move to ]\Iarion. He came to 
Marion on March 4, 1913, and bought a half interest in the firm of J. 
Winters and Comjjany, thus becoming the company part of this firm. 
J. Winters, "the land man," is one of the most successful business men 
of Marion, and the two form a strong partnership, destined to become 
one of the best known real estate firms in Indiana. Mr. Johnson has 
considerable landed interests, being the owner of 360 acres in Liberty 
townslrip and also having interests in Upland. 

Mr. Johnson is a member of the Methodist church, and in political 
matters he is a Republican. In the fraternal world he holds allegiance 
with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Mr. Johnson was 
married on July 23, 1906, to Miss Gertrude Burnside, a daughter of 
George W. and Elizabeth (Seybold) Burnside, of Marion. They have 
two children ; James Noah, Jr., aged six years and Elizabeth Rebecca, 
better known as Betty, a lively tot of three. 

JosiAH Winters. The story of the life of Josiah Winters, of Marion, 
Indiana, or as he is known in this section, J. Winters, "the land man," 
is a good example of American energy and determination. Mr. Winters 
is one of the most successful real estate men in this section of the state 
and his success is entirely due to his own efforts. He has woi'ked tire- 
lessly, early and late, and that he has taken advantage of no man, his 
popularity throughout the section proves. 

Josiah Winters is a native of Grant county, having been born on the 
29th of February, 1868, in Fairmount township. His father was Thomas 
D. Winters and his mother was Christiana (Baker) Winters, both of 
them being natives of the state of Pennsylvania. The father of Thomas 
D. Winters came to Grant county at an early date in its history. He 
settled on a farm South of Marion, and he improved this property, 
building upon it one of the finest homes in the county. He later sold 
this place and bought another three and a half miles southeast of Jones- 
boro. He eventually became the owner of about sis hundred acres of 
land in that section and he lived there until his death in 1880. Thomas 
D. Winters, his son, followed in his father's steps and became a farmer. 
He spent his life in this occupation and died about 1896. His widow is 
still living and makes her home with her children. There were tAvelve 
children born to Mr. and ]\Irs. Winters, six of whom are living. These 
are as follows: W. M. Winters, foreman at the Thompson Bottle 
Works, in Gas City, Indiana; Mrs. Mary A. Baldwin, of Fairmount, 
Indiana; Mrs. Sarah A. Love, of Marion; Mrs. Christina Kelsey, of 
•Toledo, Ohio ; Mrs. Ollie Lancaster, of Marion, and J. Winters. 

Beginning life with only a common school education, farming seemed 
to be the only vocation open to yoiing Josiah Winters. For thirteen 
years, therefore he farmed in various parts of Grant county, and during 
these years he lived carefully and put aside as much money as was 
possible for he was ambitious to be something more than a small farmer. 
He found himself, at the end of these years Avith enough money to 
purchase seventy-two acres of land in Washington township, for which 
he paid $1,375 in cash and gave a mortgage for the balance of $2,125. 
By hard work and good management he was able to pay oft" his indebted- 
ness in eighteen months. And it was not long after he had begun to feel 
that he was on the road to success, that his wife's health began to fail 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 481 

aud he found it necessary to move into Marion. He therefore sold his 
stoeli and farm machinery and with the proceeds purchased two lots 
on Spence street for $1,200. On these lots he built a modern ten-room 
house at a cost of $6,000, this being the first home which he owned. 
After his removal to Jlarion he traveled for a year as salesman for 
L. K. Price and Company. Hardware was his line, and his territory was 
Grant county. During the following year he sold windmills and cream 
separators in Grant and the adjoining counties. He then purchased a 
forty-six acre farm east of Gas City and there remained six months, 
when he sold and returned to Marion where he had built on Spencer 
avenue, and where there were better openings for him. 

On the 1st of December, 1906, I\Ir. Winters engaged in the real estate 
business in Marion and he has been phenominall.y successful. During 
his first year in this business he did $150,000 worth of business. It was 
evident that he was going to have an increasing amount of business to 
handle aud so the next year he took a partner, Leo Lyons. The business 
the second year was estimated at $200,000. After the death of Mr. 
Lyons, Mr. Winters continued alone, emi^loying his son to assist him, 
until the latter went to Davenport, Iowa, to enter a medical school. 
Since opening his real estate office six years ago Mr. Winters has done 
business to the amount of'$l,589,802.S0, this being exclusive of his loan 
business. In 1912 the increase of his business over that of the previous 
year was $83,445.50. In 1913 he became associated with a company in 
New Mexico, and has purchased 680 acres of land for his own special 
benefit. Since his business is too large to be managed by one man 
he took as a iDartner, on March 1, 1913, Alva Johnson, of Fairmount 
township, who is mentioned elsewhere in this volume. 

Mr. Winters is a strong member of the Prohibition party, and eight 
years ago was that party's candidate for sheriff of Grant county. He is 
a member of the Christian church and is a deacon in the First Christian 
church, being one of the executive committee that had the building of 
the new church in charge. He lives in a handsome home on Spencer 
avenue and his offices are in the Marion Block. 

Mr. Winters was married on the 18th of July, 1885, to Miss Mary J. 
Marine, Avho was born in Mill township. Grant county, Indiana, and was 
a daughter of Nathan Marine. Four children were born . of this 
marriage. Of these. Pearly B. Winters and Elsie L. Winters are living, 
and Onda E. and Eita M. are dead. After the death of his first wife 
Mr. Winters married a second time. Miss Jessie J. Broadt, of Hunting- 
ton county, Indiana, became his wife on March 30, 1912. 

Howard Lyon. Grant county has received some of its finest family 
stocks from Virginia, transplanted first to Guernsey county, Ohio, and 
thence to this section of Indiana. Several branches of the Lyon family, 
who early manifested a disinclination to live in slave territory, thus 
settled in Grant county not long after the establishment of civil gov- 
ernment here in 1831. The following article describes the more impor- 
tant incidents in this family migration with special reference to the 
immediate family of the above well known Jefferson township citizen, 
who.se old home place on sections 20 and 21 has many associations with 
the Lj'on name. 

They came originally from Sweden, migrating to England during 
the reign of Peter the Great and thence to America in the colonial 
epoch. The first definite information of the family in this country is 
in Virginia, and before the Revolutionaiy war. It is not known whether 
any of the family i^articipated as soldiers in that war. The grandfather 
of Howard Lyon was Richard Lyon, born in the Old Dominion about 



482 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIP^S 

1775. On March 7, 1795, he married Elenor McBride, a Virginia girl 
of Scotch-Irish aucestr.y. They lived in Virginia until 1814. Richard 
Lyon was strongly opposed to slavery, and for that reason determined 
to move his family to the free states of the north .and west. Thus he 
settled in Guernsey county, Ohio, about the close of the War of 1812, 
and he and his children were pioneers in that section, making a home 
in the wilderness and rearing his family under primitive conditions. 
His children were as follows: 1. Mary, born May 21, 1797, married 
John Grayham, and came to Indiana, both dying in this state when old 
people. They left two children, Ellen and Rachael. 2. Sarah, born 
February 24, 1799, married Thomas Deeren, lived in Guernsey county, 
Ohio, until after the death of ^Ir. Deeren, and his widow died in Grant 
county, Indiana, but her body was taken back and laid by the side of 
her husband in Guernsey county, 0. They left a large family of chil- 
dren, who were remarkable for their length of life, several living to be 
more than eighty years of age, five living at one time, and all past 
fourscore, and three are still surviving and about ninety years of age. 
3. Michael, born April 15, 1801, lived the life of a farmer in Guernsey 
county, 0., and married Mary Slater, both passing away when old 
people. Their children scattered to various parts of the country. 4. 
Elizabeth, born ]\Iay 20. 1803, married Jolni Reasoner, were early set- 
tlers in Indiana, where they spent their active lives in Delaware county, 
and died when old and left children. 5. James, born August 20, 1805, 
married Nancy Slater, came to Grant county, and died on the home 
farm in Jefferson township, when in the neighborhood of seventy years 
of age. They had several children. 6. John, who was the father of 
Howard Lyon, was born September 14, 1807, and more particular 
mention of him follows this paragraph. 7 and 8. Elias and Elijah, 
twins, born December 20, 1809, the former married Mahala Pearl for 
his first wife, and Mrs. Rachael Coats for his second, and there were 
children by both wives, and they all spent the greater portion of their 
active careers in Grant county. Elijah married Hannah Anderson, 
and they lived out their lives in Van Buren township of Grant county 
and left children. 9 and 10. The next two children were twins, and 
died in infancy unnamed. 11. William, born October 2, 1818, was mar- 
ried and died in Grant county in middle life, leaving a son and a daugh- 
ter. He was a cabinet maker by trade. 12. Richard, Jr., bom May 
20. 1815, married a Miss Funk, and they had three children; he died 
in Henry county, Indiana, where he was known as a manufacturer of 
medicine. 13. Samuel, born March 8, 1820, spent many years of his 
life in Missouri, and by his marriage to Mary Stephens, had several 
daughters. 

John Lyon, who was born in Virginia, September 14, 1807, was 
seven years old when the family migrated to Ohio, where he arrived 
at his majority in Guernsey county. He followed various occupations, 
chiefly on a farm, but also was employed on the old national pike in 
Ohio, and also engaged in the tobacco business, from which he made 
some profit. In 1837, he walked all the way from Ohio to Indiana in 
order to look over the land and select the site of a future home. He 
found one hundred and sixty acres to his liking, on the ilississinewa 
River, being the northeast quarter of section twenty-one of Jefferson 
township. Having investigated and decided upon this tract he con- 
tinued his journey on foot to the Fort Wayne land office, where he 
formally entered a quarter section and then continued on in the same 
manner to his Ohio home. There he met his sweetheart, who soon after- 
wards went on with her mother to Blackford county, Indiana, and he 
followed as soon as he could dispose of his interests in Ohio and make 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 483 

ready for a permaneiit establishment in Indiana. At that time Black- 
ford county had not been organized and its territory was a part of 
Delaware county, so that the young woman who was to become his wife 
took up her residence temporarily in the latter county so that she would 
be convenient to the county seat in readiness for marriage. This young 
woman was Nancy McVicker. She was born in Guernsey county, Ohio, 
December 11, 1815. Her grandfather Dennis McVicker, was a native 
of Virginia, and the son of a Scotchman who came to the United States 
and died in Virginia. Miss McVicker 's father was Archibald McVicker, 
a native of Virginia, but who died in Guernsey county, Ohio, and his 
widow Elizabeth survived him and brought her children to Indiana, even- 
tually settling in Jefferson township of Grant county, where she died 
when an old woman. 

After they were happily married John Lyon and wife came to their 
new home in Jefferson township. On the tract of land which he had 
previously selected the only evidence of the presence of civilized man 
was one coon tree which had been cut down by some hunters, and other- 
wise it was a perfect wilderness. A log cabin was hastily erected in the 
midst of the timber, and there they began housekeeping. John Lyon 
was a man of exceptional industry, and had the faculty of accumula- 
tion. His land in a few years was increased to two hundred and forty 
acres, and his labors gradually brought about substantial prosperity for 
all his household. In 1859, was erected a comfortable old residence 
which is now occupied by his son Howard. There both parents spent 
many years, and the mother died April 23, 1876, and the father on No- 
vember 2, 1888. In communit}^ affairs they were both active, and were 
especially prominent as early Methodists in that vicinity. Thej' took 
part in the organization of the first Shiloh Methodist church, in which 
John Lyon and wife were charter members, and he served as a trustee 
and steward until his death. During his career he voted the Demo- 
cratic ticket, but in later times was a Prohibitionist. The children of 
John Lyon and wife are mentioned as follows : 1 and 2. Lamech and 
Lemuel, born in Ohio in February, 1838, died in infancy. 3. Aaron, 
born May 9, 1840, died in Grant county, June 10, 1910; he was twice 
married, but left no living children. 4. James, born August 20, 1842, 
died March 6, 1899, at Upland, where he was a merchant. Though 
twice married he had no children. 5. David, born December 12, 1844, 
died August 13, 1896, after a career as a merchant at Upland and he 
was also well known as an Odd Fellow ; his wife preceded him in death 
two months, and left two daughters. 6. Sarah E., born May 20, 1848, 
died at the age of one year. 7. Mary Eleanor, born February 9, 1850, 
was also one j'ear of age at the time of her death. 8. Thomas Benton, 
born May 9, 1852, died February 8, 1906 ; he was a physician, but in 
later years was a successful druggist in Upland, and also prominent in 
Masonic circles. 9. John R., born February 23, 1855, is a farmer at 
Dodson, Montana, and has one daughter living. 

Howard Lyon, who was the youngest of the children of John Lyon, 
was born in Jefferson township, November 13, 1858. Reared on his 
father's farm he has lived there the greater part of his career, and while 
a boy he had the advantages of the common schools. He now is pro- 
prietor of one hundred and twenty acres of his father's two hundred 
and forty acre estate, and has made of farming a very profitable busi- 
ness. For ten years, he had a dairy farm, and on the whole has fol- 
lowed what is called mixed farming. 

In the residence which he now occupies on February 9, 1882, he was 
married by Rev. 0. C. Garretson to Miss Catherin Ginn, a twin sister of 
William Ginn, a Jefferson township citizen whose career is briefly 



484 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

sketched elsewhere in this volume. ]\Irs. Lyon was born in Henry- 
county, Indiana, December 1-4, 1856, was reared and educated there and 
in Grant count}-, and has become the mother of three children : Jas- 
per, born August 6, 1882, graduated from the gi'ade schools in 1899, 
and from the Upland high school in 1902, spent three years in technical 
studies at Purdue University, and is an electrical engineer by profession. 
During the past four years with the backing of his father, he has built 
up the Citizens Telephone Company of Upland, and recently they sold 
their stock in that institution. Jasper Lyon married ^Myrtle A. Bo^'d, 
and their children are : Florence L., born October 3, 1909 ; Donald How- 
ard, born February 15, 1911; and Eugene Willard, born ilay 4. 1912. 
2. Nancy, born March 21, 1884, gi-aduated from the Upland high school 
in the class of 1905, was a successful teacher in the county five years, and 
by her marriage to Walter Penrod has one daughter, Esther. 3. Jason 
died at the age of nine months, on September 26. 1886. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lj'on are both members of the Shiloh Methodist Epis- 
copal church, in which his father served as a trustee, and he is presi- 
dent of the board. In politics he is a Democrat, ilr. Lyon shows much 
appreciation of history and of old relics, especially of a family nature. 
In his home one of the most interesting articles is 'an old wall or shelf 
clock, which was bought in 1828 by his grandfather and which is still in 
good repair and keeps excellent time. He also values as an heirloom a 
padlock that came from Ireland with his ilcVieker ancestors, more than 
one hundred and fifty years ago, and is said to have been from a trunk 
or locker which the McVicker emigrant ancestor brought to this coun- 
try with him. 

Henry H. Blinn. One of the really successful and admirable young 
men in ilarion, Indiana, is Henry H. Blinn, the assistant cashier of the 
Marion National Bank. He has risen to his present position through 
hard work and a steady application to business. Although yet in his 
forties he has had many .years of practical experience and his business 
ability and financial training have won for him the confidence, not only 
of the ofiicials of the bank but also of the general public. 

Henry H. Blinn is a son of Samuel A. Blinu. and Rebecca (Ray- 
pholtz) Blinn, both of whom were born in Grant county. His parents 
are still living and reside on a farm in Washington township. Henry 
H. Blinn was born in Franklin township. Grant county, Indiana, on the 
21st of August, 1866. He received his earlier education in the public 
schools of Franklin and Washington townships, and after completing his 
preparatory work he entered Lebanon University at Lebanon, Ohio, 
where he remained for a time. After this he became a student in 
Valparaiso University, at Valparaiso, Indiana, where he took a business 
course. After his education was complete Mr. Blinn spent fourteen 
years as a teacher in Grant country. Indiana, and in Iroquois county, 
Illinois. It was in 1896 that Mr. Blinn entered the business world and 
became deputy recorder of Grant county. He served for five years in 
this office and then, in 1901, became a bookkeeper in the Jason Wilson 
and Company Exchange Bank. This bank was later merged with the 
JMarion National Bank and Mr. Blinn remained with the latter institu- 
tion. He advanced from bookkeeper to higher ofSces and has now 
reached that of assistant cashier. 

Mr. Bliim is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted ilasons, a 
member of ]\Iarion Lodge No. 105. He also belongs to the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, Marion Lodge No. 96. In religious matters, both 
he and Ms wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, Mr. 
Blinn being a steward in the same. Politically Mr. Blinn holds to the 
Republican faith. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 485 

Mr. Blinn was married on September 5, 1894, to Miss Martha Nice- 
wanger, a daughter of William H. Nicewanger of Van Buren township 
and a representative of one of the prominent families of Grant county. 
One son, Everett W. has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Blinn. 

George White. One of the pioneers of the past generation and one 
of the men who played no small part in the history of Grant county, 
Indiana, is George White, now deceased, but for many years a powerful 
factor in the business life of Marion and of Grant county. He was 
one of the pioneers who not only had the courage and physical endurance 
to face life in the wilderness, but he was also of the type that could see 
into the future, and he realized the structure which was to be reared in 
that rich middle western section and helped to lay its firm foundation. 

George White was a native of Ireland, having been born in County 
Donegal, in 1805. His parents emigi-ated to America a few years after 
his birth, but on the way they were captured by the British, and were 
detained at Halifax for two years, until the War of 1812, settled for all 
time the question of the freedom of the United States from the yoke of 
Great Britain. Upon reaching the United States the family made their 
way westward and settled at Cadiz, Ohio, where they lived for many 
years, with the exception of a break of three years when they resided at 
Warren, Ohio. It was in 1840 that they came to Grant county and 
located in Slarion, and here George White was to spend the remainder 
of his life. He first engaged in the dry goods business and for many 
years was one of the most successful merchants in Marion. He built 
the Iroquois building, one of the leading buildings of the city, and con- 
ducted his store in this building for many years. He always had farm- 
ing interests in Grant county and although he retired from the mer- 
cantile business many years before his death, he personally managed his 
farm up to the time of his death. At one time he was county commis- 
sioner of Grant county, and he always took a keen interest in the public 
affairs of the county. In the religious world he was a member of the 
Jlethodist church. 

George White married ilarch 16, 1829, at Cadiz, Ohio, Miss Nancy 
il. Knox, who was an aunt of former Secretary of State, Philander C. 
Knox. Ten children were born to George and Nancy White and of these 
six grew to maturitj'. Sarah White iMather, of Marion, is now the only 
living child. Of the others, William White was the eldest and lived in 
Marion ; Edgar and James also lived in ilarion ; Amanda was the wife 
of Thomas D. Thorp of Marion; and Helen married R. W. Bailey, of 
Marion. George White died in Marion in July, 1893, at the age of 
eighty-six. 

Mrs. Sarah White Mather, the only living child, is one of the most 
popular women in Marion. She has been a resident of this city for 
many years and has been a leader in many ways. She was born in 
Cadiz, Ohio, July 26, 1836, and married Charles D. Mather. Her hus- 
band was born at Muncie, Indiana, February 24, 1833, but he came to 
Marion when he was a boy of nineteen and spent the remainder of his 
life here. He was first employed as a clerk in the store of his imcle, 
Aaron Swayzee, and after a number of years in which he gathered valu- 
able experience he went to the store of Goldthwaite and Company, as a 
clerk. He became so valuable to his employers that he was rapidly pro- 
moted and after a time came to have an interest in the store. Later in 
life he engaged in the grain business and in the agricultural implement 
business, and he continued in this line until he was forced to retire from 
business on account of ill health. He died on the 16th of December, 1907. 
Mr. Mather enlisted in August, 1862, in the 12th Regiment Indiana 



486 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Volunteers and was in service until October, 1864, when he was dis- 
charged. He became firet lieutenant in Company C and was later 
advanced to acting captain. "On-ward, Christian Soldier" applies to 
soldiers of his class as he carried his religion with him in his defense of 
his country. 

Mr. Mather was a member of the Methodist church and was an active 
member of the church. He was married to Miss Sarah White on the 20th 
of March, 1866, and one daughter, Helen Louise, was born of this union, 
also a little boy, who died at the age of six years. Mrs. Mather and her 
daughter reside in the home on Branson street, and Miss Mather is 
unusually gifted along musical lines. 

Levi Moorman. It is a grateful distinction to have spent three quar- 
ters of a century in one community, and when those years have been 
filled with worthy accomplishments and with that old-fashioned spirit of 
loving-kindness, such a career becomes one deserving of admiration and 
worthy of perpetuation in any history of a county in which it has been 
spent. Levi Moorman, now living retired in Matthews, is one of the 
oldest native sons of Grant county, and now lives surrounded by his son 
and grandchildren and even great-grandchildren. Levi iloorman has 
reached a patriarchal age, and his years are well set off by his dignified 
appearance and characteristics, reminding one of the typical southern 
gentleman. • 

The Moorman family, which has been identified with Grant county 
for eighty years, comes of Welsh ancestry. The grandfather of Levi 
was born in Wales, and with a brother emigrated to the United States 
more than a centui-y ago. While the brother located either in Pennsyl- 
vania or Virginia, the grandfather went to South Carolina, and found 
a home on the Big Pee Dee River, where he passed away in the prime 
of life, leaving two sons and one daughter. His occupation was that of 
farming. These children were Lewis, Zacariah, who married and had 
a family, and the daughter married Jonathan Frazier. 

Lewis Moorman, father of Levi, was a small child when his father 
died, and his mother, who was a native of South Carolina, in 1811 emi- 
grated north with her little family to Orange county, Indiana, locating 
near Paoli, where she remained until her death at a good old age. She 
was a remarkable woman in many ways, had the physical vigor and the 
executive ability of the sterner sex, and in Orange county she established 
and developed a homestead, and was one of the early horticulturists in 
that vicinity, raising fine crops of peaches and other fruits. Lewis Moor- 
man grew up on that farm in Orange county, and in early life acquired 
the trade of blacksmith. On reaching his majority he removed to New- 
port, now Fountain City, Wayne county, Indiana, and there set up his 
smithy. Some time later he married in Wayne county, Sarah Thomas, 
who was born in North Carolina, about 1S20, and was a small child 
when she came north to Wayne county with her parents, Stephen and 
Hannah (Wilcutt) Thomas. The Thomas famil.y located in Indiana 
during the late twenties. Stephen Thomas was a practical mechanic and 
followed the trade of tinner and cabinet maker for some years, but in 
Wayne county, his energies were chiefly directed to the clearing up and 
developing of a tract of wild land, which eventually became a good farm- 
stead, and was the home of Stephen Thomas and wife until the end of 
their lives. His death occurred when about seventy years of age, while 
his widow was more than ninety-three years old at death. They were 
both Orthodox Quakers. Their children numbered six. 

After Lewis Moorman married he followed his trade of blacksmith 
for some years, but in 1833 abandoned it, and moved awav from the 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 487 

somewhat well settled community of Wayne county to the frontier of 
Grant county. In this county he became one of the original land holders, 
getting a tract by entry, direct from the government. His location was 
in Union township, which was later named Fairmount township, and 
there he lived and followed the quiet vocation of farming, until he was 
past seventy-five years of age. His winters during the last years of his 
life were spent in the home of a daughter in Iowa, and in that state he 
died in 1900. His wife had passed away about ten years before aged 
sixty-eight. She died in the Quaker faith, but late in life Lewis Moorman 
joined the United Brethren Church, and died in that belief. In early 
life his ballot was cast in behalf of Whig candidates, and later he was a 
Republican. There were five sons and four daughters in the family, 
all of whom grew up and all married but two sons, Nathan, the oldest 
brother, who died unmarried at the age of twenty-five; Steven, the 
youngest brother, who died in army during Civil War. The living sons 
are : Levi and Zachariah. Zachariah is married and lives in Jewel county, 
Kansas. He was a gallant soldier during the Civil war and in one engage- 
ment within five minutes time was shot in six different places, and never 
afterwards has been in good health. The two sisters still living are Jane, 
widow of Ira Howell, whose home is in Iowa, and who has one son and 
three daughters, and Theresa, wife of John W. Jones, a farmer in Jeffer- 
son township, and they have two sons and three daughters. 

Levi Moorman, who was the second son and fourth child in the family, 
was born in Fairmount township in Grant county. May 16, 1838. His 
early life was spent in that vicinity, and his recollection includes the 
earliest pioneer days, when log cabins were numerous as homes, when 
the schools were conducted under the subscription plan, long before rail- 
roads were any where near Grant county, and when life was a very 
simple matter compared with the complexity of the present. His advan- 
tages in the way of schools were limited by the conditions of the time, 
but he possessed a superior natural talent and intellect, and has never 
been seriously handicapped in his struggle with fortune. Sometime 
after becoming of age, he bought eighty acres of wild land, in Jefferson 
township, and that was the nucleus around which he built up his fortune. 
His eighty acres was increased under his management to one hundred 
and thirty-six acres, and was well improved with a large grain and stock 
barn, grain sheds, and a comfortable seven-room house, altogether making 
an attractive and valuable rural estate. Under his management prac- 
tically no land was allowed to go to waste, and the Moorman farm has 
long been regarded as almost a model in that community. In 1910 
Mr. Moorman suffered a stroke of paralysis and retired to Matthews, 
where he has since almost entirely recovered his health and now enjoys 
the comforts of a good home on Seventh Street. 

Mr. Moorman was married in Jefferson township, to Miss Lavina 
Lucas. Mrs. Moorman was born in Jefferson township, August 22, 1841, 
and is a sister of the present county commissioner, Thomas J. Lucas, 
whose family sketch elsewhere in this publication will give the details in 
the history of the Lucas household. Mrs. Moorman was carefully reared 
and educated in the public and city schools of Marion, and is a cultured 
and very capable wife and mother. They are the parents of one son, 
Albert A., who was born March 12, 1865, was educated in the public 
schools, and now owns and operates a fine farm of eighty acres in Jef- 
ferson township. Albert Moorman married Rachel Dorton, of Delaware 
county, and they are the parents of three children, as follows : Beatrice, 
living at home ; Clyde, who married Grace Johnson and occupies his 
gi-andparents ' farm, and they have one daughter. Delight, born August 
12, 1911 ; and Ralph, living at home. 



488 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Joel Duling. A life of quiet effectiveness, marked by a record of 
many duties well done, and many responsibilities faitlifully fulfilled, 
was that of the late Joel Duling, who was born in Jefferson township of 
Grant county, April 13, 18^4, spent all his career in this county, and 
died on his fine rural homestead in Jefferson township, June 17, 1910. 
In early life he Avas a soldier, bearing arms in defense of the Union, 
spent many active years as a substantial farmer, and left a record both 
in business and citizenship, which may well be envied and admired. 

The late Joel Duling was a son of Rev. Solomon and Jane (Hubert) 
Duling, both natives of Ohio, who after their marriage moved to In- 
diana, during the decade of the thirties and entered land direct from the 
government in Jeft'ersou township of Grant count}'. There the.y werfe 
pioneers, did their share of work, contributing towards the develop- 
ment of the country, and lived blameless and upright lives. Solomon 
Duling made a good home for his family, and died in Jefferson township 
when fifty-seven years of age, while his wife passed away at the age of 
sixty-four. He was one of the pioneer preachers of the JMethodist 
Protestant faith, in this section of Indiana, and a detailed record of his 
experiences would include much of the pioneer history, not only of his 
church, but of the people and community. He bore almost unnumbered 
hardships often exposed himself b.y swimming the swollen streams on 
horseback, and during the winter times his clothing would often freeze 
while riding along the lonely -roads between different meetings. He 
was a devoted church worker, and labored earnestly for the spiritual 
upbuilding of his community. His death occurred in 1871. His wife 
was likewise a faitliful member of the same church. They had eleven 
children, five of whom grew to manhood and womanhoocl, three were 
married and two are still living. John lives on a farm in Jefferson 
township, and the daughter Sina M. is the wife of Burton R. Jones, liv- 
ing in Marion, and they are the parents of a son and a daughter. Three 
of the Duling household were soldiers in the Civil war, including the late 
Joel Duling, and also his brothers Edmund and Elijah. Edmund was 
shot through the knee while on a gunboat on the ilississippi river and 
died soon afterwards from lockjaw, caused by the wound. He was a 
widower, at the time of his death, and his daughter Sarah J. is married 
and lives in Ohio. Elijah Duling spent three years in the war, returned 
home, and when past thirty-five years and still a bacheldr, died as a 
result of a train wreck. 

The late Joel Duling was reared on the old farm, and at the last call 
for troops, enlisted before he was twenty years old in 1864, and served 
until the end of the struggle. His military service lasted about one year, 
and most of that time he was on detached duty. When the war came 
to an end, he had just reached his majoritj% and on returning home he 
followed the labor of the home farm until 1868. In that year his mar- 
riage caused him to start independently, on a tract of eighty acres given 
him by his father in Fairmount township. Thirteen years of manage- 
ment of that estate brought him considerable prosperity, and he then 
bought the old homestead in Jefferson township, and lived there until 
his death. His farm comprised two hundred and forty acres, and part 
of it was entered by his father from the government, and has never 
had any owners except the Dulings. His attention was given to general 
farming and stock raising, and he set an example of thrift and enter- 
prise in his community. The farm was well improved with buildings, 
and in everj- direction it showed the careful industry and thrift of its 
owner. 

Joel Duling was married May 3, 1868, in Mill township, to Miss 
Mary C. Roush. Her family is one of the oldest and most distinguished 





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4^ -^1^ 





JOEL DULING AND WIFE 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 489 

ill Grant county. Mrs. Duling herself was born in ^lill township Feb- 
ruary IS, 1843, was reared and educated in that community, and since 
her marriage has devoted herself earnestly and without stint to the in- 
terests of her husband and household and was an important factor in 
making the generous prosperity that belongs to the name. In 1910, her 
husband's death occurred, and ilrs. Duling in September, 1911, moved 
to ilatthews and liought a pleasant home on Eighth street, where she and 
her son are now living and are enjo.ying quiet and peaceful days. Her 
parents were "William and Jane (ilcCormick) Roush. Her father was 
born in Pennsylvania, in 1818, and her mother in Grant county, in the 
pioneer year 1824, seven years before Grant county became organized 
with a civil government. Jane JlcCormick was a daughter of Robert 
McCormick, whose name stands conspicuous in the pioneer annals of 
Grant county. He entered some fifteen or sixteen hundred acres of land 
in this county, and at one time was the largest laiid o^^'ner in this sec- 
tion, most of his property being in Jefferson township. Robert Mc- 
Cormick died in Grant county, when less than sixty years of age, and 
his widow whose maiden name was Ann ]\IcCormick but not related, 
married for her second husband, John Fankboner and died when she 
was ninety-four years of age. AVilliam Roush came from Pennsylvania 
to Gi'ant county when a young man. married in Jefferson township, 
became the owner of two hundred acres of good land, and spent his 
career in quiet industry in that township. His death occurred April 5, 
1904, and his wife passed away November 12. 1907. They were of the 
Presbyterian faith. Mr. and Mrs. Roush had thirteen children during 
their married career, including one pair of twins. The following grew 
to maturity: Sirs. Duling; JIadison, who died a bachelor at the age of 
sixty-four years; William, who is married and has two daughters and 
lives in Jonesboro : Fremont, who lives in Jonesboro, and has two daugh- 
ters; Isaac, who died in ilarch, 1863, in a hospital at ilemphis, Tennes- 
see, after a j^ear's service in the Union army, being unmarried at the 
time; John, who lives on a farm in Clark county, Indiana, and is mar- 
ried but has no children. 

The children born to ilr. and Mrs. Duling are mentioned as follows : 
Ada, who is the wife of Charles B. Hook, and lives on a part of the old 
Duling homestead in Jefferson township, is the mother of five children: 
Virgil D., Nondas il., Paul Joel, Raymond I., and Hubert Mc. Allie 
died when sixteen years of age. "William Solomon, who is a bachelor, 
lives with his mother in Matthews, and owns and operates a part of the 
old homestead. Virgil B., is a successful farmer; owns eighty acres in 
Fairmount township, and by his marriage to Olive Himelick, has one 
daughter, Mary. Winnie F., died when nearly eighteen years of age. 
Clara B. died in infancy, ilrs. Duling, as was her husband, is an active 
member of the IMethodist Protestant church. Their married companion- 
ship la.sted for forty-two years, and was one of utmost harmony and ef- 
fective cooperation; they provided well for their family of children, 
laid up a competence for their own comfort, contributed liberally to the 
community and to the church, and are the class of people upon which 
the progress of any state or nation must chiefly depend. The late ilr. 
Duling was an active Republican in politics. As an old soldier he had 
affiliations with the New Cumberland Post of the Grand Army of the 
Repiiblic. Mrs. Duling "s father, William Roush was at the time of his 
death the oldest member of the Masonic Order in Grant county, and 
very prominent in the different Masonic bodies. 

Charles F. IMaelet. The results of youthful energA^ and enterprise 
are no where to be seen more clearlv than on Indiana farms, where the 



490 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

younger generation have caught the spirit of scientitic agriculture and 
have changed the old half-hearted conditions into an efficient, business- 
like management. Of this younger generation of Grant county agri- 
culturists, Mr. Charles F. Marley is one of the best representatives. His 
home is in section eight of Jefferson township, though his farm opera- 
tions extend to two adjacent sections, and altogether several hundred 
acres of land are under his supervision. Mr. and Mrs. Marley are young 
people who move in the best social set of Grant county, and are not 
only prosperous farming people, but leaders in community life. 

Charles F. Marley was born in Licking township, Blackford county, 
Indiana, September 17, 1886. His native township was the scene of 
his earl.y youth, and while growing up he acquired an edueatipu in the 
district schools. His parents were Joseph and Sarah (Foy) ]\Iarley. 
Joseph Marley was born at Hartford City, Indiana, August 2, 1857, 
and died near Lapland in Grant county, November 26, 1912. The Marleys 
settled in Blackford county in the pioneer days. Joseph C. Marley was 
married in Hartford City, February 10, 1882 to Miss Sarah Foy, who 
was born December 18, 1861, near Galveston in Cass county, but was 
reared and educated in Blackford county. She now lives with her 
younger son near LTpland, and is a woman of much refinement and 
intelligence. Her parents were Fantley R. and Mary (Townseud) 
Foy. Her father was born in Ohio, and her mother in New York State, 
and came as young people to Blackford county, where they were married. 
Mr. Foy was a farmer, and also operated a threshing machine for some 
years. His death occurred in Jeiferson township of Grant county, June 
30, 1911, and his wife passed awa.v at Hartford City in 1881. Mr. Foy 
was a Democrat, and his wife was a devout member of the Methodist 
church, ilrs. Sarah ilarley is one of three daughters and two sons, and 
she also adheres to the ilethodist Doctrine. Joseph C. Marley, whose 
father died in young manhood in Blackford county, in 1861, and who 
was a blacksmith at Hartford Citj', spent all his career as a farmer. 
His mother was married again after his father's death. The brothers 
of Joseph C. Marley were Frank, George. Calvin, and William, all of 
whom were married, and George and William are still living. Frank 
was well known in musical circles, and William was a carpenter and 
builder and also had musical talent. 

Charles F. ilarley was the second child and first son in a family, 
the other members of which are mentioned as follows: Nora, the wife 
of Sylvester S. Smith, living on the ]\Iarley farm, and they are the 
parents of five children ; Fred, a resident at Upland and section foreman 
for the Pennsylvania Railroad, who married Ethel Ballinger, a daughter 
of Webster Ballenger; Lee, lives at home with his mother in Jefferson 
township, and belongs to the Upland high school class of 1915. 

Charles F. ]\Iarley grew up on a farm, and after completing his edu- 
cation decided that farming offered the best opportunities for a success- 
ful career, and since his marriage he and his wife have owned and 
operated four hundred acres of land lying in section eight, one hundred 
acres in section three, and fifty acres in section nine, all in Jefferson 
town.ship. Fine farm buildings, including a dwelling of twelve rooms, 
a large barn on tlie main farm, sixty by one hundred and twenty feet 
in ground dimensions, and many other notable improvements indicate 
the progressive management of the ^Marley estate. Mr. Marley has 
learned the secret of making a high-priced land pay profits, and he 
does this by feeding all the grain and other crops to hogs, cattle, sheep 
and hoi-ses of the better grade, and his stock always command the top- 
notch prices, when sent to market. 

On February 8, 1909, in Jefferson township, Mr. Marley married 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 491 

Miss Elva Johnson, who was born in Jefferson township in 1885, a 
daughter of Noah Johnson, whose career as that of one of Grant county 's 
well known former citizens is sketched ou other pages. Mrs. Marley 
grew up in this county, had a public school education, and has entered 
spiritedly and actively into the plans and career of her husband. The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Marley are as follows : Geneva ; Joseph J. ; 
James Robert; and Charles, who died when three months old. 

Amos Pugh. One of Grant county's sterling citizens, for many 
years an active farmer of Jefferson township, and a man whose quiet 
and upright character, left its impress in his community, was the late 
Amos Pugh, who died at his homestead in section fourteen of Jefferson 
township, April 12, 1905. 

Amos Pugh was born in that township, on the old Pugh estate, 
entered by his father, on July 17, 1844, and was sixty-one years of age, 
when death came to him. He was reared and educated in his home 
locality, and from young manhood followed farming, and with such 
industry and good management that he left his family in good circum- 
stances. From 1884 until his death he lived on a farm of forty acres 
in section fourteen. His personal labors had entered into the develop- 
ment of that place, and among its improvements are a comfortable 
nine-room house, surrounded with attractive grounds, and also a good 
barn. ]\Ir. Pugh lived his later years as almost an invalid, and his 
death was from bright 's disease. 

The parents of the late Amos Pugh were Marshall and Elizabeth 
Pugh, who were born in Virginia, were married in Ohio and in the 
latter twenties, or early thirties came to Indiana and took up land in 
the wilderness of Grant county. Their first log-cabin home was built 
in the green woods, and as they possessed the hardy character of the 
typical pioneers they prospered in proportion to their efforts. Marshall 
Pugh was born in 1795, and his wife in 1804. They were working mem- 
bers of the Methodist faith, and assisted in the organization of the 
old Shiloh M. E. Church, and Marshall Pugh gave the cemetery in which 
the body of himself and wife now lie side by side. They had a large 
family of children, and the only survivor is Alfred, a justice of the peace 
at Upland, who lives with his children. 

On January 18, 1866, Amos Pugh was married in Jefferson town- 
ship to Margaret Walker, who was born in that locality August 27, 1842, 
and is now living on the Pugh homestead. She was reared and educated 
in her native township, and after her marriage entered actively into 
the plans and works of her husband and was a good manager and 
largely responsible for the success which came to both of them. Since 
her husband's death she has lived on the farm, and has done much to 
increase its value and improvements. Mrs. Pugh is a daughter of Jolui 
and Miriam (Case) Walker. John Walker was born in Virginia, a 
son of Joseph Walker, and when a young man moved to Ohio, where 
he married in Preble county. Two children were born in that county, 
and in 1834, the Walker family came on further west and found location 
in Grant county. The journey was made across the country with wagon 
and team, and they entered upon their possessions in Grant county as 
typical pioneers. The portion of the land which he secured for his 
homestead was in the school section, and the father devoted many years 
of labor to the clearing up and developing of a home. A man of excep- 
tional education, he not only did farming, but spent the winter seasons 
for a number of years in teaching in the community. His death occurred 
in Jefferson township in July 1845, when only thirty-six years of age. 
Some years later his widow married Jesse Ballinger, and they reared a 



492 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

family, aud died ou tiieir farm in Grant county, she being past seventy- 
five years of age, and he a little older. There were six children in the 
Ballinger household. John AYalker aud wife also had six children, 
namely: Samuel, who died in 1908, in Jefferson township, where he 
was a farmer, and left two children; Catherine, became the wife of 
James Needier, and they are both now deceased, leaving a family : ;\lary 
died after her marriage to "William Simons, who now lives at Summits- 
ville, Indiana: Sarah J., died wheu niue months old. The uext in liue 
is ^irs. Pugh, and "William C. Walker, deceased, was a well known 
carpenter of Grant county, to whom is accorded separate space in this 
volume. 

Mrs. Pugh is a member of the Jefferson Christian Church as was 
her husband. The latter always voted the Democratic ticket. The only 
child of Mr. and ^Ii-s. Pugh was AYilliam Elmer, who was born October 
21, 1866, was well educated, took up the occupation of milliug, and 
after some years spent in that business he died at the home of his 
parents, November 5, 1894. He was at that time less than thirty years 
of age, was a young man of great promise, aud very popular in the 
community. In politics he gave his support to the Prohibition cause 
and voted for the candidate, ^h: St. John. Mrs. Pugh has also fostered 
two children, aud has given them the care aud affection of a true mother. 
The first of these is EfSe, who was weU educated iu the public schools, 
and who married 0. C. Needier, a successful young farmer in Jeffer- 
son township, and a son of Joseph Needier. Mrs. Pugh also reared a 
niece, Lois E. Simons, and she was married at the Pugh homestead to 
Louis Hanley. 

Thomas J. Lucas. Among the old families of Grant county, that 
bearing the name of Lucas has been identified with this region since 
the da.vs when the wilderness and the Indians prevailed. Its members 
have followed farming ehiefl.y as their occupation, though the name 
is also represented iu the profession and in public aff'airs. Mr. Thomas 
J. Lucas of Fairmount has for many years been a successful farmer, 
aud is now active iu public affairs as county commissioner from the 
third district of the county. 

The family ancestry goes back to early Scotch settlers of America, 
The first home of the family in America was in the state of Virginia, 
where the Lucases and related families lived for several generations. The 
grandfather of Thomas J. Lucas was Basil Lucas, a native of Virginia, 
who mari'ied a Miss ililburn. A recent investigator of this family 
records has shown that Mr. Lucas is a direct kinsman of General Thomas 
Jefferson Lucas, who was a soldier in the "War of 1812. and also in the 
war with Mexico during the -lOs. General L. J. Lucas was a son of 
Geueral Lucas, who gained distinction, as a soldier under Napoleon in 
the French wars. Basil Lucas was also related to "William Penn, the 
founder of the Pennsylvania colony. 

After his marriage in Virginia, Basil Lucas emigrated to Highland 
county, Ohio, where he was one of the early settlers, and where he 
followed farming. He died when about eight.v years of age. aud his 
wife was probably about the same age at the time of her death. They 
were I\Iethodists iu religion, and the father voted the Democratic ticket. 
The children of these parents were: 1. Basil. Jr., a farmer, who came 
to Grant county, where he died. He reared two daughters who grew to 
maturity. 2. Joseph Lucas located in Randolph county, Indiana, mar- 
ried and had a family of six children of whom one is still living. 
3. John, married in Ohio, then came to Randolph countj', Indiana, later 
to Grant county, where he died. He left the following named children: 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 493 

Noah, Julia, David, Anna, and Mary, the last two being still alive. 
4. Rev. Simeon came to Randolph county, and spent all his active career 
as a preacher for the Methodist Church. He was married in Ohio, and 
he and his wife left a family of children. 5. Noah, lived and died in 
Ohio, where he was married and had two sons. 6. Thomas Alilburn 
was the father of Thomas J. Lucas, and his family record is a;iven at 
greater length hereafter. 7. William was a veteran of the Mexican war, 
and for his services in that conflict received a grant of land in the old 
Indian Reserve in Grant county. After improving this estate he moved 
to Ohio and died in Allen county of that state. He was a devout Metho- 
dist, and a great worker for his church. He was married but had no 
children. William Lucas was also distinguished as a powerful athlete, 
and in the early days often wrestled with the Indians. 8. Sarah married 
a Mr. Allison, and they lived and died in Illinois, leaving two daughters. 
9. Anna married a Mr. Bragg, and they spent their lives in Ohio as 
farmers. In their family was one son who proved his bravery as a 
Union soldier during the Civil war. 10. Amos, was married, lived in 
Ohio, and left one son. 

Thomas Milburn Lucas, the father, was born in Highland county, 
Ohio, June 10, 1814. Growing up on a farm, he was one of a number of 
children, and owing to such a large family and the pioneer circumstances 
of the times, it was often difficult for the pai-ents to provide all the 
necessities of life. The children went barefoot throughout the summer 
season, and as the procuring of shoes was not an easy matter some of 
the children often went without until well into the winter season. Shortly 
after he became of age, Thomas M. Lucas was married on J\Iay 23, 1839, 
in Ohio, to Jlary Moore Shoemaker. She was born in New Jersey, 
March 30, 1813, and was a child when she came over the Alleghany 
Mountains in wagon and team to Highland county with her parents. 
Her father, George Shoemaker, married a Miss Moore. Both her par- 
ents lived and died on a farm in Ohio, and reached advanced age. The 
Shoemaker's were all ilethodists. 

In Ohio was born George il. Lucas, the first child of Thomas M. 
and wife. After his birth the family moved to Grant county. The 
father had come to this county in 1840, locating a tract of government 
land on Barren Creek in Jefferson township. He then rode all the way 
back to Southei-u Ohio, and after entering and making his first payment 
on the land at the land office at Fort Wayne, finally set out in 1842 
with his yoiing wife and child across country to their new home. The 
settlement of the Lucas family in Jefferson township was in the midst 
of the green timber, and their first home was a primitive log cabin, with 
greased paper for window light, with a puncheon floor, and with a 
door made of slabs hung on wooden hinges. Practically all the expe- 
riences which have been described as a portion of the early settlers of 
Grant county were participated in by the early Lucas family. Among 
. other things they had to pay a pound of pork for a pound of all the 
salt used in their establishment. Thomas JI. Lucas prospered as a 
farmer, and eventually owned three hundred and twenty acres of land, 
having put three hundred acres of this under cultivation and improve- 
ment. His death occurred in March, 1874, while his wife survived him 
several years, ilrs. Lucas, the mother, as a housewife in those pioneer 
days probably had no superior. She was noted for her excellent cook- 
ery, and her children remember that she was as fussy about the clean- 
liness of her puncheon floor on the old cabin as any modern housewife 
is about the hardwood floors which are now found in so many Grant 
county homes. Both father and mother were life-long ilethodists, and 
took part in the first organization of the church in their section of the 



494 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

county. Thomas M. Lucas was an official of the church, a class leader, 
a trustee, and superintendent of the Sunday school. 

The children of Thomas M. Lucas and wife are given the following 
records on these pages: 1. George died when twelve years of age. 
2. Laviua is the wife of Levi Moorman, and lives at ilatthews in Grant 
county. They are the parents of one son, Albert. 3. Albert Lucas, a 
retired farmer in Jonesboro, of Grant county, married Louisa Kidner, 
and their children are Otto and Armeuta. 4. John, lives in Jefferson 
township, a prosperous farmer, and married Clementine Jenkins, and 
their children are Lona, William, Florence, Daisy, Inez, Albert, Charles, 
and Elizabeth. 5. Anna M. is the wife of William P. Roush, living in 
Mill township, where they are substantial farming people. Their chil- 
dren are Nettie and Walter, both the children being now deceased. 
Walter was a student of Purdue and went with a party of students to 
Indianapolis to a football game, but the train was wrecked and he was 
killed. 6. Thomas J. was the youngest of the family. 

Mr. Thomas J. jjucas was born in Jefferson township at the old 
homestead, December 18, 1849. His early training was received in the 
public schools. Taking up the career of farming he early accumulated 
some property, developed a good homestead, and still has his old farm 
of one hundred and thirty-five acres in Jefferson township. It is 
improved with an excellent barn, a comfortable dwelling, and on its 
feed lots and pastures run a number of horses, hogs and sheep. He 
raises coi-n, oats and wheat, ajid feeds practically all his crop to his 
stock. Mr. Lucas continued a resident on the home farm until 1892, 
when he moved to a house in town, at 117 South Sycamore Street. This 
is now one of the attractive homes of Fairmount. 

September 25, 1872, in Jefferson township, Mr. Lucas married 
Amanda Dunn. She was born in Jefferson to\\Tiship, December 13, 1852, 
and received her education in the same locality with her husband. 
Her parents were Harmon and Mary (Minnick) Dunn. Her father 
was born in Delaware county, Indiana, about 1822 or 1823. Her mother 
was a native of Rockingham county, Virginia. They were married in 
Grant county, and started out as farmers in the midst of the wilderness. 
They hewed a home out of the woods, and were among the substantial 
pioneer settlers in this section of the state. Mr. Dunn died during 
the last year of the Civil war in 1864, being in the prime of life. His 
widow died some years later, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Joseph 
W. Littler, when seventy-six years of age. The Dunns wei'e Presby- 
terians in religious faith. The children of the Dunn family were Elzina, 
widow of Robert F. Careins, and lives at Matthews, and has three sons ; 
Amanda, the second, is Mrs. Lucas; Loretta is the widow of I. H. Shoe- 
maker, and has one son and two daughters, and lives in Oklahoma City ; 
Calvin died at the age of twenty-two; Elizabeth is the wife of J. W. 
Littler, living in Jefferson township, and the mother of four daughters. 

The family of Mr. and Mrs. Lucas comprise the following children: 
Dr. Wilbur was born June 22, 1872, was liberally educated and prepared 
for his profession in the Northwestern University at Chicago, where he 
was graduated M. D. in 1903. He is now in successful practice at 
Pueblo, Colorado, and was married October 7, 1908, to Edith M. John- 
son of that city, and they have one daughter, Edith Lenore, born Decem- 
ber 26, 1910. "2. Carl Dunn Lucas, D. D. S., was born October 24, 1879, 
graduated from the dental college of Indianapolis, in the class of 1902, 
and has a high rank as a practitioner of dentistry, and also through his 
other professional relations. He is a member of the faculty of the 
Indianapolis Dental College, and has gained a great reputation as a 
lecturer on dentistry throughout the central states and the west. He 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 495 

married Effie Janet Carter, of Arcadia, Indiana, and they liave a son, 
Carl, Jr. 3. Mabel, was born November 14, 1884, was educated in the 
Fairmount Academy, and married Dr. L. D. Holiday. Their children are 
Murrey L. and Philip L. 4. Georgia was born November 9, 1889, was 
educated in the city grammar and high schools, studied music in the 
Marion Conservatory, under Professors Owen & Nusbaum, and was. 
later a student under j\liss C. Louise Dunning of New York City, but 
now at Portland, Oregon. Miss Lucas is now taking a normal course, 
and as a student of great ambition and talents is preparing herself ta 
teach the Dunning course of music. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lucas are attendants at the Congregational Church. 
Mr. Lucas is now serving his second term as county commissioner of 
Grant county from the Third District, having been chosen on the Demo- 
cratic ticket. He has also served a term on the Fairmount City Council, 
and as a successful business man his services to the public have been 
greatly appreciated by the local citizenship. He is affiliated with Lodge 
No. 383, I. 0. 0. F., and with Lodge No. 381, Ivnights of Pythias, at 
Fairmoimt. He has passed all the chairs in these orders. In politics 
he is regarded as one of the leading Democrats of Grant County and 
has served as chairman of the township committee, and has frequently 
attended as a delegate the county, state and congressional sessions. 

George Needler. For seventy-nine years George Needier has lived 
in Grant county. His recollections cover almost three-quarters of a cen- 
tury, and he is one of the few survivors of the actual period of pioneer 
circumstances and events in Grant county. At the present time nearly 
every section of land in the entire area of Grant county is more or less. 
improved, and every section is a praiseworthy tribute to the hardy en- 
deavors and the courage and ability of the pioneers. Of those who came 
in the vanguard of civilization and assisted in the clearing up of one of 
these sections, the Needier family is not only one of the oldest, but 
through the worthy character of its various members is one of the most 
prominent. The Needier family originated in Germany, where the great- 
grandfather George Needier was born, and where he was married, and 
partly reared his family. About 1790 he crossed the Atlantic with his 
little household, and on the vo.vage his wife succumbed to the hardship 
of the long trip, and was buried at sea. With his foiir sons, George 
Needier landed in Philadelphia, whei-e he lived until his death at a good 
old age. His son George Needier, Jr., married Mary Snyder, who, 
though her name belies the assertion, is said to have been born in Ireland. 
After his marriage George, Jr., pursued his trade of cooper for a short 
while, then moved to the vicinity of Winchester, Vii-ginia, and while there 
his family of six sons were born, whose names were : James, George, 
John, Jacob, David and Abner. About 1807 or 1808 the family left 
Virginia and settled in Guernsey county, Ohio, their location being on 
lands reserved by the government for school purposes. Some years were 
spent in that vicinity, and by the combined labors of all the household, 
a substantial home was added. Some of the sons got their first capital 
and start in life through employment in the salt works in that vicinity. 
Then in 1832, James Needier, the oldest of the children, came to Indiana, 
and in the wilderness of Jefferson township of Grant county, acquired 
four hundred acres direct from the government. The following .year he 
again came out and built a log cabin in the midst of the wilderness, and 
there in 1834 he brought his young wife and his father and brothers also 
came and thus the household was reunited in the valley of the Mississin- 
ewa. However, the mother of James died during the journey out to 
Grant county, and thus was enacted one of the tragedies of pioneer life. 



496 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Her'body was laid to rest at the roadside at Darby Plains near Urbana, 
Ohio. After they were all settled and started in the regular pursuits of 
a pioneer eommunit}-, George Needier Junior was quietlj- taken from life 
at an old and vigorous age. He had been cutting wheat and still had 
his sickle in his hand when death called him. 

James Needier was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in 1797, grew 
up in Virginia and Guernsey county, Ohio, learned the trade of cooper, 
though practically never followed it, and on coming to Grant county was 
soon followed by all his brothers except Abner, who remained behind. 
Abner later came to Grant county, still later went to ^lissouri and died 
there. James Needier lived the life of an industrious pioneer and cleared 
up two hundred acres of land in Jefferson township. There he pursued 
his vocation as a farmer until his retii*ement, and he spent his last days 
at the home of a son in Hartford City, where he died in 1881 at the age 
of eighty-four years. He was a Democrat in politics, belonged to the 
Presbyterian church, and was an upright and honored citizen. He mar- 
ried Rebecca Ward, a daughter of Captain John Ward, who held a com- 
mission in the United States Army during the War of 1812, and who 
died about 1815. Rebecca Ward was born about 1807, was reared in 
Ohio, in the family of some Irish people, until her marriage. She died at 
the old home in Jefferson township, about 1870. Her religion was that 
of the ilethodist church. 

Mrs. George Needier was born in Guernsey county, Ohio, May 14, 
1832. about two years before the family left that region and settled in 
Grant county. His career has been one of great activity, and of con- 
siderable variety. For four years he taught school, was in the business 
of manufacturing tile for eight years, served in the office of county com- 
missioner four years, and aside from those activities has spent the greater 
port of his life as a farmer and stock dealer. His success has fluctuated, 
and at one time he was the owner of two hundred acres, but reverses 
reduced his 'property until he now possesses about sixty acres, and yet 
is still in fair circumstances, and is regarded as a man of reliable 
integrity. 

'Mv. Needier was first married in Blackford county, Indiana, to Lydia 
Cunningham. She was born and reared in that county, her birth taking 
place in 1832. and she died in 1891. The children by her marriage were 
as follows : Franklin died after his marriage leaving two children, who 
live with their mother in Oklahoma ; ilary M. is the wife of W. H. Coffin, 
a farmer in Delaware county, and they have children; Clementine lives 
in Muneie, the wife of Willard Nolan, and their children are five in num- 
ber; Emazetta is the wife of Charles Dodson, of Cincinnati, Ohio, and 
they have one daughter; Andrew J. is a_ resident of IMuneie, and has a 
family of two children; Charles is a fariher in Jefferson township, and 
has six children. For his second wife Mr. Needier married Elizabeth 
Monroe, who was born in Grant county, July 23, 1844. a daughter of 
Joseph and Hannah (Shirar) Monroe, who came from Pennsylvania, 
were settlers first in Ohio, and later came to Grant county in 1840, where 
they were among the early farmer settlers. Mr. Monroe died IMarch 28, 
1856, and his wife on JIarch 27, 1875. They left two sons and two daugh- 
ters, who are still living and three of them are married. 

John Bobret. The era of natural gas brought many able citizens 
to Grant county — men of large and varied industrial and commercial 
experience, whose enterprise and energy has done much to develop the 
county during the last thirty years. After a number of years as a suc- 
cessful glass manufacturer, John Borrey has chosen Fairmount as the 
home of his quiet years and prosperous retirement. With an ample 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 497 

share of the world 's goods, he shows a fine sense of responsibility toward 
his communit}-, and is employing his means and influence for the im- 
provement of his home locality. 

Few Grant county families have so interesting a history as that of the 
Borreys. They are of French ancestry, aud Mr. Borrey's grandparents 
lived and died in Alsace. This border province of the German Empire 
has been changing destinies during the last century, so that a native of 
Alsace may properly claim to be either a native of Fi-anee or of Ger- 
many. At the time of the Napoleonic wars, Alsace was taken from Ger- 
man}' and made a part of the French Empire. So it remained until 
the Franco-Prussian war of 1871, when it became one of the prizes of the 
war, and was returned to Germany and has since been a part of the 
German Empire. The grandparents of John Borrey spent their lives 
in Alsace while it was under French dominion. They were Catholics 
in religion, and the grandfather followed the family occupation of glass 
blowing. Mr. Borrey has no information concerning the names of his 
grandparents. However, it is known that there were four children, two 
sons aud two daughters, the sons having been John and ilichael. aud 
one of the daughters named Elizabeth. These children were born in 
Alsace, but subsecjueutly all moved into Germany, where thej^ spent their 
lives in quiet industry and comfortable home life. They all reared 
families of their own and for many years had their homes at Sauerbroke, 
Germany. 

Michael Borrey was born in Alsace in 1820. He learned the trade 
of glass blower when a young man, went to Germany, served according 
to the law of the land for three years in the army and then took up his 
regular work as a glass blower. He followed with great skill a special 
department of this work in the manufacture of large carboys, carboys 
being large glass containers. His father had worked at the same line 
of glass blowing in France, and the two sons on going to Germany took 
a contract for the blowing of these large bottles under condition that all 
the bottles should bear the family name of Bori-ey stamped upon them. 
Both brothers John and Michael continued in the manufacture of car- 
boys until they were sixty years of age. They were large and powerful 
men and were masters of their trade. ]\Iichael died in Germany when 
eighty-two years of age. Throughout his active career he had been a 
hard worker, and enjoyed peculiar esteem in his community. He mar- 
ried a German girl named Salma Schamm, a native of Frederickstahl, 
one of the great glass manufacturing centers of Germany, She died 
twenty years before her husband. All the family were Catholics in 
religion. The children of Michael and wife were : Lena, who married a 
glass blower in Germany, and they spent their lives in that country, leav- 
ing a family of children; Sophia, married a window glass blower, and 
they were the parents of five children, the family spending their lives 
in Germany; Lizzie married Joseph Smith, also in the window glass 
trade, and they died in Germany, leaving a son and two daughters; 
Jacob, was a bottle blower in Germany, married aud died when liis only 
child was one year of age, while his widow is still living ; Net.ia married 
a German glass blower, later moving to the United States, and both died 
at Pittsburg, Pennsjdvania, leaving two sons and a daughter, 

I\Ir. John Borrey of Fairmount, a brother of jMichael, .just named, was 
born in Frederickstahl, Germany, near the French border, August 9, 
18-18, He grew up there, learned the glass blower's trade both in the 
manufacture of bottles and window glass. In 1868 he decided against 
serving in the German Army, and in order to escape that rule he emi- 
grated to the United States, landing in New York City, From there he 
went to Pittsburg, and on account of his skill soon found a profitable 



498 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

employment in one of the large bottle manufacturing and window glass 
houses of that vicinity. After four or five years he moved to Ravenna, 
Ohio, where he spent sixteen years at his trade. For about five years 
of this time he was manager of the plant. As a glass blower he had few 
superiors, and was a quiet and efiflcient worker, well minded his own 
bxisiness and still was popular and a good manager. 

While a resident of Ravenna, Mr. Borrey married Louisa Hahne, who 
was born at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, April 4, 185i. of German parentage. 
Her parents, when she was fifteen years old, settled at Ravenna, Ohio, 
her father having been a glass flatner, but later taking up the occupa- 
tion of farming. Her father died near Ravenna, Ohio, at the age of 
seventy-three, while her mother sm-vived until eighty-eight years of age. 
Her parents were married in Germany, and came to the United States 
in 1848. 

ilr. Borrey through his early career both when single and after his 
marriage exercised a great deal of thrift and economy in the management 
of his financial affairs, and as he commanded high wages, both as a 
blower and as manager, he was earlj' on the highroad to prospei'ity. In 
1888 he went to Massillon, Ohio, where he took stock in a window glass 
manufacturing company. Becoming manager, he remained there until 
the development of the natural gas belt in Indiana, and the consequent 
cheap fuel made it profitable for the company to move away. The com- 
pany accordingly dismembered the entire factory, and brought it in 
pieces to Greenfield. Indiana, and during 1890-91 rebuilt the entire fac- 
tory. It was conducted for the manufacture of window glass success- 
fully until 1897, when Mr. Borrey sold his interest. He then came to 
Fairmount and established a glass factorj- in this Grant county town. 
From the start, largely owing to his long and varied experience, and a 
peculiarly able management, he was successful, and after about a year 
sold out the plant at a large profit over its cost to the American Window 
Glass Company, the trust. He was later employed by the combine, as 
a special manager, going from one factory to another to see that things 
were all right, but finally gave up the glass business altogether, and 
retired to his fine home at 510 Ea.st Washington Street in Fairmount. 
He now enjoys a large and ample prosperity, and among other property 
owns one of the best business blocks in the city at the corner of Main 
and Washington Streets which he erected. Although he had well earned 
a period of leisure. Mr. Borrey is not the kind of man who can sit down 
and fold his hands, and soon after he retired he bought a fine farm of 
good land with excellent improvements, well built and modeled houses 
and barns and with silo and all the appliances of modern farming, and 
on that country estate finds a profitable pleasure in farming and stock 
raising. He raises all the general crops and feeds ever\^hing to stock 
on the place with the exception of his wheat. He keeps only first class 
stock and has about a dozen first cla.ss horses, and all the machinery 
is of the verj' best type. 

ilr. Borrey is a Republican in polities, and is afiSliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His wife belongs to the Congre- 
gational church. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Borrey were born 
the following children : Bertha, who was born in Ravenna. Ohio. July 3, 
1871, and is the wife of Paul Hagen, whose home is Indianapolis. They 
are the parents of two children. ^larie and Lucile. William, the second 
chUd. was born September 27, 1872, is a glass manufacturer at Kokomo, 
Indiana, and is unmarried. Flora, was born January 11. 187.5. and is 
the wife of Edward Welsch. a hardware merchant at Fairmount. They 
have no children. John G. was born November 4. 1876. is a farmer and 
manager of his father's estate, being unmarried and living at home in 
Fairmount. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 499 

Joseph Ratlipf. Among the old and honored residents of Fair- 
mount, one who has been a witness to and a participant in the won- 
derful development which has changed this part of Grant county from 
an undeveloped wilderness into one of the garden spots of the State, is 
Joseph Ratliff, who is now living retired from active pursuits, after 
many years spent in agi'icultural work. Mr. Ratliff is a gi-andson of 
Richard Ratliff, who was born in North Carolina, and whose parents, 
natives of England, emigrated to America at an early day and spent 
the remainder of their lives in farming, leaving a family of eight sons 
and four daughters. 

Richard Ratliff grew up a farmer, and married a North Carolina 
girl whose name has since been forgotten. After the birth of several 
children, he left his native State in 1810, and came north across the 
mountains in teams, settling in a Quaker locality in Wayne county, 
near the present site of Richmond, although that city had not yet been 
established. There, in the wilderness, surrounded by pioneer hard- 
ships and privations, he made a home for his family, but later disposed 
of his interests and moved on to a new property near Hopewell, in 
Henry county, where the remainder of his life was passed in tilling the 
soil. Both he and his wife lived to advanced years and reared a large 
family of children. 

Gabriel Ratliff, the father of Joseph Ratliff, was one of the older chil- 
dren in the family, and was born in North Carolina in 1805, being five 
years of age when he accompanied the family to Wayne county, Indiana. 
He was not yet of age when he came to Henry county, and he was there 
married to Catherine Pearson, also a native of the Old Noi-th State, 
where she was born in 1808. She had come with her parents to Wayne 
county in 1810 or 1811, by wagon, and located in the Quaker settlement 
near what is now Richmond. At that time one John Smith started a 
little store, and there they purchased their first goods and sold their 
eggs and produce, this being the only store for many miles around. 
The Pearson family accompanied the Ratliff" family to the same neigh- 
borhood in Henry county. Mr. and ilrs. Ratliff' settled on a property 
not far from Spiceland, and there Mr. Ratliff died in 1845, aged only 
forty years, during an epidemic of typhoid fever. Subsequently his 
widow and her children moved to Miami county, Indiana, locating on 
land then situated in the Indian Reserve, where many of the Indians 
still remained. There Mrs. Ratliff was married to a Mr. Atkinson, who 
died in 1871, and Mrs. Atkinson then came to Grant county, where she 
passed away at the age of seventy-five years, at the home of a son. She 
was a Quaker until late in life, when she adopted the faith of the Wes- 
leyan Methodist church. By her last union she had no issue. 

A brother of Gabriel Ratliff, Nathan Ratliff", was one of the most 
famous hunters and trappers in Indiana, and many tales ai-e told as 
to his prowess with the rifle. As related, on one occasion, when invad- 
ing a bear's den after a litter of cubs, he was surprised by the return of 
the mother bear, which he killed only after a desperate struggle. He 
spent his entire life in the woods of Henry and Blackford counties, and 
died in the latter when about eighty years of age, leaving a widow and 
family. 

Joseph Ratliff was the fifth son and ninth child in his parents' family 
of twelve children, and was born in Henry county, Indiana, in 1838. 
He was nine j'ears of age when he accompanied his mother to iliami 
county, and there he received his education, attending school a part of 
the time until he was fifteen years of age. At that time there were no 
roads, and in their travels to church and to the homes of their friends 
the early settlers had to depend upon blazed trails. He grew up an 



500 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

industrious, thrifty farmer, and this has been his occupation throughout 
life. An intei'esting conversationalist, he speaks entertaininglj- of the 
early days, of "log rolling" and "house raising," of coon hunting and 
of running through the woods after the cows, and of going a dozen 
miles through the woods to church and to market. 

Mr. Ratliff was married first in Miami county, Indiana, to Mary 
A. Lamb, who was born a Quakeress, in the Quaker settlement near 
Moonsville, Madison county, Indiana. She died in 1881, leaving seven 
children. Prior to this, in 1871, Jlr. Ratliff had come to Grant county 
and purchased a fine farm of ninety-two acres, just beyond the limits of 
Fairmount. He married in Miami county, for his second wife Mrs. Mary 
(Arnold) Thomas, who was born June 7, 1851, in Miami county, daugh- 
ter of Nathan and Sarah (Overman) Arnold, natives, respectively, of 
North Carolina and AVayne county, Indiana, although Mrs. Arnold was 
of North Carolina parentage. Both families were of old Fox Quaker 
stock, and came to Wayne county as early as 1800. Nathan Arnold and 
Sarah Overman were married in 1839, on August 21, near Richmond, 
and moved to Grant county, Indiana, in 1847, to a farm which the 
grandfather Arnold had entered from the government. It was all then 
a wilderness. Some years later Mr. Arnold traded his farm for one 
in Miami county, where he and his wife spent the remainder of their 
lives, he passing away in 1868, at the age of fifty-five years, and his wife 
in 1894, when seventy-three years of age. Both were active Friends, 
Mrs. Arnold being overseer and elder of the church at Amboy at the 
time of her death, while Mr. Arnold was for many years an elder. He 
was a substantial and progressive farmer, and owned the first carriage 
in this section, in which he traveled in his preaching trips. By her first 
marriage with Mr. Simeon Thomas, who died at the age of twenty-five 
years, Mrs. Ratliff had two sons: Nathan H. and Herbert E., the former 
of whom lives on Mr. Ratliff 's farm in Fairmount township, while the 
latter lives at ilarion, Lamoure county, North Dakota, where he has 
large agricultural interests. 

Of the children of his first marriage, Mr. Ratliff has three living. 
Charles, a farmer of Cass county, Michigan, is married and has a family 
of five children. Hon. Ancil, a successful farmer of Liberty towiiship, 
Grant county, is an ex-member of the Indiana Legislature, and led the 
local option movement four years ago in Grant county. He has six 
children, all graduates of Fairmount Academy, while one daughter, Ina 
M., is a Friends missionary in Cuba. Milo E. Ratliff, D. D. S., with a 
large dental practice at Cassopolis, Michigan, is a graduate of Fair- 
mount Academy, Earlham College, Northwestern Dental College, Chi- 
cago, and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, ]Michigan. He mai'- 
ried Belle Bogue, and they have twin daughters. 

Mr. Ratliff 's life has been a long and useful one, and his activities 
have served not alone to give him financial independence and prominence 
in Fairmount, but have also assisted materially in advancing the inter- 
ests of his adopted community. He has always been straightforward and 
honorable in his dealings, and everywhere he is held in the highest 
esteem by all who know him. He was trustee of Fairmount township 
for eleven years, elected on the Republican ticket. 

John H. Simons. Among the old families of Grant county that of 
Simons has had a prominent place from the time when this county was 
on the western frontier. Its members have prospered as farmers both 
in the times of early settlement and in later generations, have been good 
business men and public-spirited citizens and their lives have been led 
along the paths of quiet industry and prosperity through a period of 



BLACKFORD AxVD GRANT COUNTIES 501 

three-quarters of a century. The representative of the name selected 
for special note in this article is John H. Simons, for many years identi- 
fied with business and civic aifairs at Fairmount. 

His grandfather, Adrial Simons, was born in the state of New York. 
He served as a soldier in the war of 1812. In his native state he mar- 
ried and then moved to Pennsylvania which remained his home until 
about 1820. He then went west until he reached Darke county, Ohio, 
and his death occurred there in 1876. There was a large family of ten 
children, all of whom grew up and two of them are still living: Mrs. 
Naomi Broderick, of Fort Wayne; and Sarah J. Wilt, on a farm near 
Warren, Indiana. 

Henry Simons, the father, was born near Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
May 15, 1815. He was a small boy when the family moved out to Darke 
county, Ohio, and in that pioneer locality he grew up. In 1837 he set 
out from Darke county, walked all the way through woods and over the 
old time trails, to Grant county, where he entered eighty acres of land 
in section thirty-six of Fairmount township. Then he walked to the 
laud office at Fort Wayne, seventy-five miles distant, entered the land 
and paid the fees, after which he retraced his steps to Grant county and 
cleared ofl: the woods from a few acres of the land. These preliminaries 
having been accomplished he went on to his old home in Ohio, where he 
married Phoebe, a daughter of Solomon Thomas. In 1839 or 1840 he 
brought his young wife to Grant county, and located on the eighty aci'es 
which he entered a couple of years before. There he lived and his death 
occurred in 1902 on the thirty-first of March when at an advanced age. 

Henry Simons attained the distinction of a long and well spent life. 
In his community and in his family he was noted for his uprightness 
and high qualities of mind and heart, and may be said to have fulfilled 
all the obligations of righteous living. He was a member of the Chris- 
tian church and in politics a Republican. His first wife died in the 
early fifties, leaving five children. Two of them, William and Adrial, 
are living and have families of their own. For his second marriage 
Henry Simons, in 1853, took Mrs. Elizabeth Parrill, nee Walker. She 
was born in Rockbridge couut.y, Virginia, in 1826. When she was thir- 
teen years of age she came with her father to Grant county. Here she 
was married to James Parrill, and left one son, Joseph, who is now in the 
automobile business in Fairmount. She died on ilarch 19, 1899, leaving 
the following children by j\lr. Simons : John H. ; Levi, a farmer in Jef- 
ferson township, and the father of three childi-en; Wilson, Avho lives on 
a farm in Jefferson township, is married, and his seven children are at 
home; jMata, wife of Oliver BuUer, who resides in Fairmount and has 
one son and one daughter. 

John H. Simons was born on the old homestead in Fairmount town- 
ship, November 17, 1854. His youth was spent on a farm, and he was 
given better than ordinary educational advantages. From the country 
schools he attended the Marion city schools, and afterwards was a student 
at the National Normal University at Lebanon, Ohio. He began his 
career as a teacher, and later entered the lumber and saw mill iudustiy. 
His partner for some seven years was William H. Lindsay, until he 
finally sold out to Mr. Lindsay. All his life he has been skilled in the 
mechanical arts, and has done much work as a carpenter and builder. 
Mr. Simons was one of the organizers of the Citizens Telephone Com- 
pany at Fairmount, served as its president seven years, and as secretary 
and treasurer during 1911 and 1912. He is now a stockholder in this 
successful enterprise. His business career has been one of success, and 
all his aecomijlishments have been worthy and of benefit not only to him- 
self but to the community. 



502 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Mr. Simons served two terms iu the city council at Fairmount. In 
politics he is a Republican, and at the present time he is holding the 
office of township assessor. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Knights 
of Pythias Lodge in Fairmount. 

In 1891 Mr. Simons married E. Rulh Stalker, who was born in Ran- 
dolph county, North Cai'oliua, August 11, 1863, a daughter of Thomas 
and Sara J. (Elliott) Stalker. Her father was a member of the Quaker 
sect, and her mother a Methodist. Her parents were married in Ran- 
dolph county. North Carolina, August 4, 1817, and her father died there 
after a career as a farmer, on November 2, 1864. His widow was left in 
very poor circumstances, and with seven children iu her care. In 1865 
she brought her familj^ out to Indiana and went through many hard- 
ships iu her endeavor to keep her flock together until they were grown. 
One of her children died at the age of fourteen. A son, Jabez L. Stalker, 
is now living in Marion county, Oregon, and has one son who is also 
living. Another of the Stalker family is Paulina, widow of Harrison 
Wiand of Marion, and she has seven children still living. Mr. and Mrs. 
Simons are the parents of one son, Harry L., born June 2, 1892, a grad- 
uate of the city high school, and still at home. 

Adrial Simons. Since his birth nearly three score and ten years ago, 
Adrial Simons has lived in Grant county, has met and accepted the 
hazard of chance and circumstance, has steadily strengthened a reputa- 
tion for integrity and unimpeachable conduct, and along with a fair 
degree of well won prosperity has acquired those inestimable riches of 
character and honor. 

This is an old New England family, and great grandfather Adrial 
Simons was born in one of the New England states, served as a soldier 
in the Revolutionary war, was married and later moved to Bradford 
county, Pennsylvania, where he reared a family of sixteen children. His 
wife"s maiden name was Bingham. They both attained to good old age, 
and died in Pennsylvania. Adrial Simons, the grandfather, was born 
either in New England or Pennsylvania about 1793, and was brought up 
on a farm in Pennsylvania and was there married. His first child, Henry 
Simons, father of Adrial Simons of Grant county, was born 'Slay 15, 1815, 
and four years later, in 1819, the little family came out to Ohio and settled 
in Darke county. In Darke county, Adrial Simons and wife spent most 
of their .vears, and his wife passed away about 1855. They had estab- 
lished themselves in the wilderness, and eventually acquired a good farm, 
and made a comfortable home for themselves and children. Some years 
after the death of his wife, Adrial Simons moved out to Indiana, and 
died at the home of a sou, Henry Simons, in Jefferson township, in 1875. 

Henry Simons, who was the oldest of the family, had brothers and 
sisters who grew up as follows : Eliza, who died after her marriage, and 
after she had reared a family ; William, died in Warren, Indiana, in 1912. 
when past ninety-two years of age — he lived with his wife for more 
than sixty years, and had a large family of children ; Anna, married, 
died without children; Adrial, third of the name, who married and reared 
a family and died in Huntington, Indiana ; Erastus, who had a family 
and who died on a farm in Grant county; Sophronia, the wife of William 
Helms, and both died in Huntington county, Indiana, having a family of 
children: Naomi, who married a ^Mr. Broderick. who died in Darke 
county and she died in Huntington, Indiana, in October, 1913 ; ilaurice, 
who died in Huntington county. Indiana, was a farmer, miller and 
railroad man, and left a family ; Sarah J., the wife of Martin Wilts, lives 
near Warren, Indiana, and has several children. 

Henry Simons was reared in Darke county, Ohio, and in that vicinity 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 503 

married Phoebe Thomas, a neighbor girl, a daughter of John and Agnes 
(MeClure) Thomas, who were natives of Virginia, but spent most of 
their lives near New iladison on the Whitewater river. Soon after 
their marriage and before the birth of any children, Henry Simons and 
wife moved out to Indiana, and in IS-tO located on government land in 
section thirty-six of Fairmount township. Their location comprised 
eighty acres, and had been selected by Henry Simons, according to a 
usual custom of that time, some months previous to the settlement of his 
family. Probably when he first selected the land he made a little clearing 
and erected a log cabin home. Anyhow such a house was the first shelter 
of the Simons family in Grant county, and he and his young wife began 
housekeeping there and set out with courage and determination to make 
a home for themselves in the wilderness. The wife of Henry Simons died 
in February, 1852, being then only thirty-two years of age. She left five 
children. Henry Simons then married for his second wife, Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Parrell, whose maiden name was Walker, and who was the widow of 
James Parrell. She had one child by her previous marriage. Joseph W. 
Parrell, who lived in Fairmount township. Elizabeth Simons died leaving 
four children, all of whom are now married and have families of their 
own, their names being John H., Levi P., David W., and ]Mata il. Henry 
Simons survived both wives and died at the old homestead March 30, 
1902. By his first marriage, there were children as follows : An infant 
that died unnamed; William, who is now a resident of Fairmount town- 
ship, a retired farmer, and who has one son and two daughters; Adrial, 
mentioned below; Jonathan, who died of scarlet fever in the winter fol- 
lowing his mother's death, and that same plague carried off other chil- 
dren named i\Iartha Ann and Ransom E. 

In four successive generations there has been an Adrial Simons, and 
Mr. Simons of Jeffei-son township continues the custom from his great- 
grandfather, his grandfather, and his uncle. Adrial Simons was born 
on the old Fairmounf township homestead March 28, 1845, was educated 
in that vicinity and his home was with his parents until he was twenty- 
one years of age. He secured his first small store of capital bj' working 
at wages for neighboring farmers, and at the time of his marriage started 
out on his own account, with only a small amount of land, with very 
little stock and siipplies, and all his propei-ty has been won through the 
thrift and good management of himself and wife. Mr. Simons now pos- 
sesses a fine farm estate of one hundred and sixty acres, and all but three 
acres of this might be considered under the highest state of improvement. 
A large red barn and a fine ten-room house are conspicuous features of 
the Simons estate and the farm is well stocked and with abundance of 
water, and its crops measure up to the best standards of Grant county 
agriculture. Mr. Simons has an excellent local reputation as a breeder 
of high-grade shorthorn cattle and Poland-China hogs. 

In July, 1874, Mr. Simons was married in Jefferson township to Miss 
Elizabeth M. Needier, who was born in Jefferson township February 
14, 1844, was educated in this locality, and her parents were James and 
Rebecca Needier, early settlers who located in Jefferson township during 
the thirties. Her mother was an active member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church, while Mr. Needier was associated with no church organiza- 
tion. ]\Ir. and IMrs. Simons have the following children : Ora Bell, who 
died in infancy ; Roscoe E., who died at the age of twenty-five unmarried ; 
Carl C, who died unmarried at the age of twenty-two and who was .just 
at the entrance to a most promising manhood; Malevie M., who was 
educated in the common schools and lives at home with her parents. Mr. 
Simons is a Republican but has never shown any desire for public office, 
although public spirited in all his relations with community affairs. 



504 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

John R. Little. For sixty years the Little family have lived and 
borne vrorthy parts in the activities of Grant county. The present 
active generation of the name have been farmers, chietiy, but its members 
have also done well in business and industry. The part chosen by John 
R. Little has been education. He was educated in the normal depart- 
ment of Fairmount Academy, and for thirteen years did a most successful 
work as a teacher in Fairmount township. In November, 190S, the 
people of the township recognizing his superior qualifications, elected 
him township trustee, and he has been kept in office ever since. The 
schools of the township were never better administered. He is a force- 
ful, public spirited citizen, and one of the most popular men in the 
county. 

John R. Little was bona in Faii-mount township, July 31, 1871. His 
family record is an interesting and honorable one. His great-grand- 
father, John Little, Sr., was born in Randolph county. North Carolina, 
of North Carolina parentage. Owing to certain misfortunes he got in 
debt, and according to the laws then prevailing in that state he was sub- 
ject to arrest and imprisonment. Refusing to accept the burdensome 
and unjust conditions, he left the state and was never heard of again. 
His widow, whose maiden name was J\Iary Nicholson, was thus left with 
four sons, David. Nathan, Zimri, and John Jr. These children were 
bound out according to the methods then in vogue. David was bi'ought 
to Indiana in a very early day by Aaron Hill, and lived and died in 
Wayne county, where he secured land, improved it, and made a com- 
fortable little fortune. He was three times married and reared a large 
family. He was eighty years of age at the time of his death. The son, 
Zimri, died in North Carolina, where he reared a famil}^ Nathan 
and John, the latter the grandfather of Mr. John R. Little, in 1S52 
brought their families to Indiana, locating in Randolph countj-, where 
they started life anew. Nathan was trained at the trade of tanner, and 
followed that business in Randolph county for a number of years. In 
1853 both Nathan and John moved to Fairmount in Grant county, and 
here Nathan continued tanning for many years. His death occurred 
when he was an old man in Grant county. He was first married in 
North Carolina to Nancy, a daughter of Asa Rush. She died in Fair- 
mount, leaving a family of children. His second marriage was to Mrs. 
Rachael Foust, whose maiden name was Modlin. Rachael IModliu had 
married for her first husband John Little, Jr., a brother of Nathan and 
grandfather of the present Fairmount lown.ship trustee. John Little, Jr., 
died in 1853, and she later married James Foust, who also died. Then 
she became the wife of Nathan Little and introduced several peculiar 
relationships in the family records. By her marriage to James Foust, 
there was one child. Nathan Little had no children by her. She died 
several years before her last husband. 

John Little, Jr., who has already been mentioned, was born in North 
Carolina about 1810. After his father was forced to leave the state on 
account of debt, the boy was bound out to a farmer named Zachariah 
Nixon, and when he was twenty-one years of age he was free to pursue 
his own devices. His mother died about that time, and he established a 
home of his o^^^l by marriage to Rachael ]\Iodlin, whose history has 
alreadj' been alluded to. To the marriage of John and Rachael were 
born five children in North Carolina. These children were : Alexandria, 
Thomas, Sarah J., Noel, and ilary Emily. All then came north to 
Randolph county, Indiana, in 1852, and in the following year located 
in Grant county, their home being near Fairmount City, where the father 
died November 17, 1853, when in the prime of life. The widow, as 
already stated, then married James Foust, and had one child, David 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 505 

Foust, who died young. Of the five children of John Little, Jr., the 
only survivor is Alexander, who was born in 1S39, and was about four- 
teen years old when his people came to Grant county. He enlisted in 
Company H of the Twelfth Indiana Volunteers in 1S61 and after the 
expiration of eight months of service reenlisted for the period of three 
years or during the war. His second enlistment was in Company B of the 
Seventh Indiana Cavalry. He saw a long and arduous career as a 
soldier, and was discharged at Austin, Texas, in February, 1866. He 
was in many campaigns and engagements, but w'ent through all escap- 
ing wounds or capture. He now lives retired at Fairmount, one of the 
honored old veterans of the war, and a kindly and esteemed citizen of 
the county. He is a Progressive in politics and has membership in the 
Jieesou Post No. 386, G. A. R. Alexander Little married ilary T. 
'Johnson of Fairmount, and of their six children four are living, all of 
whom are married and have children of their own. The second child of 
John Little, Jr., was Thomas, father of John R. Little, concerning Avhom 
more is said in a following paragraph. Jane, the third in order of birth, 
married Jesse W. Crisco, both now deceased, and of their three children 
one is living. Joel M. married Serepta ilcCoi-mick, both now deceased, 
and they left a family of six children. Emily married Oliver McCor- 
mack, a farmer, and siie is now deceased, while her husband married the 
second time, the second wife also being deceased, and he lives in Grant 
county. 

Thomas Little, father of John R., was born in Randolph county. 
North Carolina, December 9, 1842, and came with his parents to Ran- 
dolph county, Indiana, in 1852. This journey was made with a one- 
horse team, in company with a large party of people making the migra- 
tion through the west. In 1853 the family moved to Grant county, 
where he grew to manhood, and at the age of twenty years, in 1862, 
he enlisted for service in the Civil war as a member of the Eighty-Fourth 
Indiana Regiment. Later, on account of sickness, he received an honor- 
able discharge and was sent home to die, but instead got well, and before 
the war was over enlisted in the Seventh Indiana Cavalry. He remained 
with that command until the war was over. At Guntown, ^Mississippi, 
he received a wound from a bullet through the ankle, and suffered from 
the effects of that injury all his life. He died at his home in Fairmount, 
July 29, 1905. He always stood high in the community, was a man of 
industry and excellent business judgment and had friends wherever he 
had acquaintances. He belonged to Beeson Post No. 386, G. A. R., was 
affiliated with the ]\Iasonic Lodge at Jonesboro, was a Republican in 
politics, and belonged to the Friends church. 

Thomas Little was married in Fairmount township to Susanna Foust, 
who was born in Randolph county, Indiana, October 5, 1848. She came 
to Grant county when a girl with her parents and grew up and spent 
the rest of her days in this locality, her death occurring in August, 1909. 
Her father was James Foust, already mentioned in this family record 
as having married the widow of John Little, Jr. Mrs. Thomas Little 
was a member of the Quaker church. She had the following children: 
Wintford, deceased; Florence, deceased; Luther, deceased; John R. ; 
Rosanna, who died in childhood: Albert, who is married, lives in 
Danville, and has a family; Marilla, who died young: Charles, who 
is a glass blower, has a family and resides at Montreal, Canada; 
Leonard, a farmer near Jonesboro, Indiana, married and has a family; 
Frank, a glass blower living in Fairmount with his family; Annie, 
who died in childhood; Grace, who lives with her brother, John R. ; 
Robert, who is married and lives in Pulaski county, Indiana, where 
he owns a farm and is the father of one child. 



506 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

ill-. John R. Little who inherited the substantial family characteristic 
of honest purpose and industrious habits was reared in Fairmount town- 
ship, aud was graduated from the normal department of the Fairmount 
Academy iu 1892. With education as his chosen calling, he qualified 
as a teacher, and did a successful part in instructing the young in his 
home township. Since his election to the office of trustee, he has given 
practically all his time to the administration of the township school 
system. In the township are several good school houses, built of brick, 
and most of them are constructed of a modern type. He has under him 
nine teachers, and through his office has the entire responsibility of hir- 
ing, placing and paying the teaching staff of the township. The annual 
fund provided for this purpose by taxation and from other sources in 
the township amounts to forty-live hundred dollars. In politics Mr. 
Little is a stanch Republican. 

In Fairmount, on May 2, 1900, Mr. Little married Effie Davis, who 
died in 1906. She was born June 17, 1879. At her death she left a 
daughter, Mary, who was born August 20, 1901, and is now a student 
in the public schools. Mr. Little for his second wife was married on 
March 4, 1913, to Mrs. Ella Moon, whose maiden name was Lamb. She 
was born in Howard county, Indiana, in 1873, was reared and educated 
there and was a daughter of William and Artie Lamb. Her father died 
in 1913, while her mother still lives at Greentowu, in Howard county. 
The Lamb family were Quakers in religion, and Mrs. Little was one of 
four children. By her marriage to Eslie Moon, now deceased, i\Irs. Little 
had two children, Leo and Emerson, both now nearly grown. Mr. and 
Mrs. Little belong to the Friends church and are popular members of 
the social community at Fairmount. 

William W. Wake. One of the most enterprising merchants it has 
ever been the good fortune of Fairmount to claim as a citizen is William 
W. Ware, head of a large establishment dealing principally in buggies, 
harness and heavy farm machinery, and for forty years a resident of 
Grant county. In addition to his keen business ability, ]\Ir. Ware is one 
of the kind of business men who believe that the best method of doing 
business is to give value for value. He has therefore won the trust and 
friendship of every one with whom he has come in contact, and he per- 
forms a useful part of community service in addition to his business 
activities. 

William W. Ware was born in Guilford county, North Carolina, June 
15, 1867. His parents were Joseph B. and Naomi (Mendenhall) Ware. 
His mother was born in Guilford county, a daughter of Mordecai and 
Lydia (Pugh) Mendenhall, both natives of North Carolina, Quakers in 
in religion and farming people, spending all their lives in their native 
state. Joseph B. Ware was born in Granville county, of North Caro- 
lina, a son of Henry and Sallie (Hicks) Ware, natives respectively of 
Virginia and Granville county. North Carolina. They were married in 
North Carolina and lived to a good old age. Henry Ware was a member 
of the Episcopal faith, while his wife was a Presbyterian. 

Joseph B. Ware and wife were married in Guilford county. North 
Carolina, and lived there until 1867. during which time their first child 
William W. was born. The family then moved to the north locating 
first at Hendricks county, Indiana, near Amo. There the father pur- 
sued his trade as a plasterer and mechanic for several years. Within 
that time was born the only other child, Ada. In 1873 the family moved 
to GraJit county, locating two miles southwest of the city of Fairmount. 
There the father continued to follow his trade as a plasterer contractor, 
and did work over a large territory for fifteen years. Finally he de- 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 507 

voted all his energies to farming, and is still a resident of the farm and 
interested in its active management. He is seventy-six years of age, 
and for the past fifty years never had a day of sickness until the summer 
of 1912, and is still smart and active. His wife, now seventy-two years 
of age, is somewhat enfeebled from the weight of years. They are both 
active members of the Friends church, and the father is a Prohibitionist 
in politics. Besides William, their only child is Ada, wife of Rev. Oscar 
H. Trader, a minister in the Friends church and a resident of Fair- 
mount. Mr. and Mrs. Trader have two children, Cleo, a graduate of the 
Fairmount Academy, and the wife of Clarence Riggs of Logansport, and 
Retta, a graduate of the Faii-mount Academy and living at home. 

William W. Ware was nine years of age when the family moved to 
Grant county, and he grew to manhood here, and in 1888 was graduated 
from the Fairmount Academ3^ His early career was devoted to teach- 
ing, and he has a recoi-d of fifteen years of service in the school room. 
During all that time he lost only one day through illness. For three 
years he was pi'incipal of the Fowlerton schools in this county, and 
has the distinction of having organized the consolidated schools m that 
vicinity. While still following the profession of teaching he became 
intei-ested in mercantile affairs, and joined Mordecai M. Nixon in the 
farm implement and machinery business for five years. He was then with 
0. M. Trader, and in 1899 they established the Fairmount Buggy Com- 
pany, a concern which was conducted by them for ten years. Mr. W^are 
then took over the business and conducted it independently two years. 
At the end of that time he became associated with M. A. Hiatt in the 
harness and buggy trade, and theirs is now the largest establishment of 
its kind in southern Grant county. They carry a splendid stock of both 
high priced and medium priced goods, valued at five thousand dollars. 
They occupy a good store building on north Maine Street, one hundred 
by twenty-five feet, and also two warehouses for the storage of buggies 
and harvesting machinery. 

In Fairmount township in September, 1895, Mr. Ware married 
Nettie Dare, who was born in Union county, Indiana, August 1, 1868. 
She was reared in Knox county, Missouri, to which locality her family 
moved in 1876. In 1893 they returned to Indiana, and located in Grant 
county, where she has since lived. Her parents are Robert and Mary 
(McQuoid) Dare. Her mother died in Grant county at the age of 
fifty-eight, in August, 1911. Her father is now seventy-three years of 
age, and has his home in Fairmount city. During the Civil war he was 
a soldier in an Indiana regiment, and went through the war without 
wound or capture. Mr. and Mrs. Ware have no children. In politics 
he is a Prohibitionist and he and his wile take a very prominent part in 
the Little Ridge Friends church. Mr. Ware is teacher of the Ware 
Adult Bible Class, one of the largest rural bible classes in the county, 
with a membership of fifty. Sir. Ware owns a nice country home, a 
mile and three quarters from Fairmount and has already accumulated 
a generous competence for his later years. For nine years he gave his 
services in behalf of local education as a member of the board of trustees 
of the Fairmount Academy. 

William H. Lindsey. Born in Grant county, Mr. Lindsey learned 
a good mechanical trade, spent many years in building and contracting, 
and later invested the proceeds of a well spent career in farm lands, 
being now one of the largest landholders in his part of the county. He 
lives retired at Fairmount, but has not yet felt the necessity of relaxation 
on account of age, and enjoys the vigor of life to its full. His family 
has been represented in Grant county nearly seventy j'ears, and the name 
has always been associated with substantial worth and integrity. 



5U8 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

The family of Lindseys were originallj^ from the north of Ireland 
and of what is known as yeotch-Irish stock. Between one hundred and 
tweuty-flve and one hundred and tifty years ago they crossed the Atlantic 
and located in Guilford county, North Carolina. There the tirst genera- 
tions lived and died and were as a rule farmers and mechanics. The 
history of those early generations is largely lost to record and it is only 
known definitely that the grandparents of William H. Lindsey lived and 
died in North Carolina. 

Daniel T. Liudsej-, father of William H., was born in Guilford county, 
North Carolina, February 6, 1815, being one in a family of three chil- 
dren and the only one who came north. His early years were speui on 
the old Guilford county farm, and when he was about eighteen he bouud 
himself out for his board to serve three years in learning the cabinet 
maker "s trade. After three years of apprenticeship he continued to 
work tor some time for his old employer as a journeyman. At the age 
of thirty when still unmarried, he left North Carolina, and moved to 
Indiana, settling in Delaware county. There he met and married Nancy 
E., a daughter of Hiram and Martha (Leach) Lee. Both her parents 
were born in Virginia, were married there and then moved to Franklin 
county, Indiana, where their daughter Nancy was born ^lay 14, 1827. 
When she was nine years of age, the family in 1836 moved to Delaware 
county, and there her parents took up anew the burdens of pioneer 
existence and the responsibility of making a new home in the wilderness. 
Her father hewed a farm out of the woods, and there he and his wife 
died, the latter when in middle life, while her father was twice married, 
after the death of his first companion. He died in the fall of 1876, when 
about fourscore years of age. There were two sons and one daughter by 
the second wife, and one son by the last marriage. Daniel T. Lindsey 
was a skilled workman, and followed his trade as a cabinet maker for 
a few years after his marriage. He then took up carpentry and build- 
ing, and still later did some farming. After his marriage he lived in 
Henry county, Indiana, until 1846, in which year he settled in Fair- 
mount township, and ten or eleven years later moved to Franklin town- 
ship, this county, where his death occurred January 27, 1899. His 
widow survived him and died at the home of her daughter Mrs. George 
Berry in Marion, May 3, 1910. She belonged to the old-school Baptist 
faith which the father also believed, and this denomination had been the 
church of their parents before them. Daniel T. Lindsey was a Demo- 
crat in politics. Daniel T. Lindsey and wdfe had twelve children. There 
were five sons and seven daughters, and of these nine grew to maturity, 
and all were married. Four sons and four daughters are now living. 

"William H. Lindsey was born in Fairmount township, November 26, 
1852. In 1857, when he was five j^ears old the family moved to Franklin 
township, and it was there that he spent his boyhood days and was reared 
and educated. The school he attended was the old Baptist school house, 
two miles west of Roseburg. Later he turned his attention to the practical 
things of life, learned carpenter work under his father, and made that 
trade the basis of a successful business career-. February, 1872, he moved 
to the city of Fairmount, where his skill as a builder and reliability as 
a contractor brought him a large patronage. He built a great many 
homes in Fairmount, and dwelling houses and barns throughout the 
country in that vicinity. In 1887 he abandoned his trade, and in the 
spring of the following year established at Fairmount a saw and plane- 
ing mill and lumber yard. This Avas a prosperoiis business establish- 
ment, and was continued by him until 1901 when he sold out. He then 
bought sis hundred and twelve and a half acres of land in Liberty town- 
ship. His possessions in that township comprise some of the finest 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 509 

farm lands in the county and all of it is in an excellent state of cultiva- 
tion and improvement. He has six sets of farm buildings ou the land, 
and all the tenants are well provided for and are a prosperous and 
substantial little colony of farmers. Mr. Lindsey himself lived on the 
farm three years, but then returned to his city home. He owns a beauti- 
ful residence at 304 E. Washington Street in Fairmount. As a farmer 
he has made an exceptional success in the raising of corn, wheat, oats, hay 
and clover, and has made a practice of feeding nearly all his crops on his 
own laud. In Jefferson township of Grant county, on ]\Iarch 8, 1877, was 
solemnized the marriage of William H. Lindsey to IMiss Sarah D. Couch. 
Mrs. Lindsey was born in Grant county on the old Jefferson township 
homestead of her parents September 16, 1855. Her home has been in 
this county all her life, she was reared and educated here, and her family 
name has long been honorably identified with this section of the state. 
Her parents were Samuel and" Nancy (Furnish) Couch, natives respect- 
ively of Indiana and Ohio. They were married in Jefferson township, 
Grant county, and began their married life in this county. Her father 
died at the age of sixty-two and her mother passed away ou Christmas 
Day of 1901 at the age of seventy. The Couches were of the old-school 
Baptist Faith. They were the parents of seven children, all of whom 
married, and all had" children except one. who died soon after marriage. 
The children of Mr. and Mrs. Lindsey are noted as follows : 1. 
Vella was born November 28, 1877, and is the wife of J. Otto Fink, 
assistant superintendent of the Premier Auto Company of Indianapolis ; 
their three children are William, and Vella, both in the city high school, 
and Mary E., aged fourteen. 2. Evva, born March 15, 1881, was edu- 
cated in "the Fairmount high school, and is now the wife of Charles H. 
Hubbard, a glass manufacturer at San Springs, Oklahoma. Their 
children are ilargaret E., aged ten. and Catherine, aged six. 3. Burr 
died at the age of three years. 4. Guy died when aged ten months and 
eleven daj's. 5. John C. born November 16, 1895, is now a member of 
the Fairmount High School Class of 1915. The church attendance of 
the family is at the Congregational, and ^Ir. Lindsey is a Democratic 
voter. Fraternally he has taken both the lodge and chapter degrees in 
Masonry at Fairmount, and is also affiliated with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows at Hackelman. 

Santford Little. Not only through his enterprise as a successful 
farmer has j\lr. Little contributed to the permanent prosperity of Grant 
county, but has exercised his inventive ability in the perfection of devices 
for the lightening of human labors on farms throughout many states, 
and as he is still young his activities in this direction may be considered 
only to have fairly begun, and his career will have many successful 
accomplishments to record during the subsequent years. Mr. Little on 
his mother's side is descended from the McCormick family, so prominent 
since pioneer da.vs in this section of Indiana, and i-elated to the McCor- 
mick family which produced the inventors and manufacturers of the 
early reapers, and first successful harvesting machines. Perhaps from 
this side of the house ilr. Little has inherited his inventive turn of 
mind. His ad.iustable device for a spring seat is one of his improvements, 
and the upright stay for hay racks has been patented and has been sold 
over a wide territory, and is one of the best things on the market for hay 
wagons. Mr. Little has also perfected a unique machine for picking up 
hogs and turning them over in order to operate on them for vaccination 
and altering, and this invention finds much favor among veterinary sur- 
geons. Another farm implement liearing the name of IMr. Little as pat- 
entee is his hog ringing machine, which operates with great rapidity and 
causes less pain than the old and slower process. 



510 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

In his farm operations ilr. Little pursues the modern and scientific 
method of rotation of crops, and is what might be called a mixed farmer, 
using his land to raise crops and feeding all the products to the stock 
on the place, thus preserving and increasing the fertility of the soil. His 
place in section five of Jetferson township comprises one hundred and 
sixty acres of land, and practically all of it is well improved and very 
little land goes to waste under the management of ilr. Little. The fruit 
orchards are one of the attractive features of the Little farm and his 
stock are of the very best grades. 

Santford Little was born in Fairmount township, in Grant county, 
July 18, 1877, a son of Joel and Sarepta (McCormick) Little. Both 
parents were born in Indiana, the father born in Randolph county and 
mother in Grant county, and they are of the old pioneer stock in Grant 
county. More will be found concerning the ancestry and earlier genera- 
tion of the family in this county on other pages of this history. Joel 
Little after his marriage lived on a farm in Fairmount township, where 
his wife died in 1887 at the age of thirty-four, and he passed away in Au- 
gust. 1897, being then fifty years of age. The Little family are Quakers 
in religion. Santford Little grew up in his native township, was educated 
only in the common schools, and since youth has applied himself to farm- 
ing. Practically all his inventions have grown out of his close observa- 
tion of the needs of practical devices about a farm, and he is deserving 
of great credit for his ability in perfecting machines and improvements 
which supply a want perhaps long appreciated by other farmers, none 
of whom have had the practical ability to fill the vacancy. 

Mr. Little was married in Madison county, Indiana, to Mary G. 
Thurston, who was born and educated in that county, a daughter of 
Joseph and Elizabeth (Welsh) Thurston. Her parents were prominent 
and successful farmers and owned five hundred acres of well improved 
land in iladison county. Both are now deceased, ilr. and ilrs. Little 
are the parents of two children : Lawrence W., born September 22, 1901, 
died February 15, 1904; Hazel i\I., born March 23, 1903, is a student in 
the ^latthews public schools. Mr. Little and wife attend the Baptist 
church and in politics he is a Republican voter. 

Eael Morris. An honorable record of lives worthily lived, of duties 
and obligations well performed is that of the Morris family, in whose 
younger generation is Earl Morris, present town clerk and treasurer of 
Fairmount. Few Grant county families go back further in American 
residence and, like so many other substantial people of this section, the 
early stock was Carolina Quakers, the religion of simplicity being still a 
marked family trait. 

The Morris family, of English stock, came to America during the 
early colonial days, perhaps two hundred years ago, locating in North 
Carolina, and being represented in that old commonwealth for a number 
of generations. Adequate data is not at hand concerning the first genera- 
tion, and the first of the family concerning whom there is definite infor- 
mation was Thomas, who was born in North Carolina, was a Quaker, and 
farmer, and spent all his days in his native state. He married Sarah 
Musgrove, also of a Quaker family, and she probably died in Randolph 
county. They had a large family of ten children, four sons and six 
daughters. 

Aaron Morris, son of Thomas, was the second in the family and was 
born in Randolph county. North Carolina, January 4, 1791. He died in 
May, 1832, in Indiana. He married Nancy Thomas, who was born 
October 27, 1800, in North Carolina, and died March 2, 1832, in Wayne 
county, Indiana. They both sleep their last sleep side by side in the 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 511 

cemetery at Fountain City. They were among the early founders of the 
Quaker church in Indiana, were upright, god-fearing, and thrifty people. 
They were probably married in North Carolina, and it appeai-s that they 
became residents of Indiana, about 1818, locating at Fountain City, in 
Wayne county. In the family of Aaron Morris and wife were five chil- 
dren, mentioned as follows : William was born in 1820, married Margaret 
Jones, and they left one son and two daughters; John T., was the grand- 
father of Mr. Earl Morris, and is mentioned at greater length in suc- 
ceeding paragraphs ; Anna, died in Indiana ; Jesse married and at his 
death in Michigan left a family, and the last twenty-seven years of his 
life were spent in blindness. Hannah was the second wife of Axium 
Elliott, and died at the age of twenty-four, being buried in Marion, 
I. 0. 0. F. cemetery, without children. 

John T. Morris, grandfather, was born at Fountain City, Indiana, 
November 22, 1821. When he was eleven years old he lost his father by 
death, and as both parents died about the same time, in Grant county, 
Indiana, the children were scattered and taken into other homes to be 
reared. John T. went to Grant county, and was bound out to Silas 
Overman, working on the farm as a bound boy until he had completed 
his apprenticeship at the age of twenty-one. He was then ready to make 
his independent start, having received for all his labor only his board 
and clothes, and had a few dollars and a pair of overalls as extra clothing 
when he started for himself. In 1846, four years after he had reached 
his majority, on the twenty-second day of April, he married Rebecca 
Jay, who was born in Indiana, September 15, 1827, and who died 
August 29, 1868, in Illinois. John T. Morris lived on a farm in Grant 
county for a number of years, later moved to Illinois, spent some time 
in the far northwest in the state of Oregon, afterwards retui-ned to 
Indiana, and lived first in Rush county, and later at Newcastle, in 
Henry county. He still lives at Newcastle, being a remarkably well 
preserved old gentleman, who has never been obliged to wear glasses and 
has his hearing almost perfect. He is an intelligent reader, and has had 
many exceptional experiences during a long career. He has been a life 
long member of the Quaker church, and in politics, has always voted for 
the prohibition cause. During his residence in Rush county he married 
for his second wife Sarah Ann Gray, a native of Indiana, who died in 
Rush county. For his third wife he married Mrs. Emil.y (ilacey) 
Winslow, who is now past seventy-six years of age. There were no 
children by the second and third marriages, but those by his first wife 
were as follows : 1. Thomas Elwood, born February 9, 1847, now a resi- 
dent of Florida, and by his first marriage had children Charles L. Clark- 
son D., and William. By his second wife he was the father of Myrtle, 
Earl, Esther, and Harry, all of whom are living but Esther. 2. Aaron, 
born January 25, 1849, died June 29, 1876, unmarried. 3. Mary Eliza, 
born March 17, 1852, died in August, 1887, in Grant county, Indiana. 
She married Christopher Porter, also deceased. They had four children : 
Anna, John, Lizzie, and Florence, all of whom are deceased. 4. Bryon, 
bom July 7, 1854, married Elizabeth Hodson, and is a dentist at Portland, 
Oregon. Their children are Willis, Chester, and Lewis. 5. Luther Lee 
was born June 6, 1857, and is mentioned in the following paragraphs. 

6. Eli 0. was born December 21, 1859, and died unmarried July i, 1876. 

7. Emma was born March 28, 1863, and died January 17, 1878. 

8. Daniel, born August 20, 1865, with present whereabouts unknown, but 
if he is living he is probably in Alaska. 

Luther Lee Morris was born in Indiana, spent most of his early life 
and received his education in Rush county, and grew up on a fann. 
After he became of age he located in Grant county, took up farming, and 



512 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

was also engaged in tile manufacturing. For some time he resided at 
Marion, and was a street paving contractor for a time. Later he engaged 
in the wood and fuel business, and about twenty years ago moved to 
1^'aii-moivut. He is now street commissioner of the town of Fairmount. 
In politics he is a Republican. 

ilr. Luther L. Morris was twice married. His first wife was Ida 
Leapley, who was born in Marion, and who died in that city in the 
prime of life. Her one son was William Clifford Morris, now a farmer 
west of Marion, who married Fay Stephens, and has one sou, Harry 
Luther. The second marz'iage of Mr. Morris was to Melissa Draper of 
Marion. She was born in Grant county on a fai-m, May 5, 1863, and is 
still living. Her parents died when she was a child, and she was reared 
in the home of her grandfather, Hezikiah Nelson. She is the mother 
of Earl, and Otto. The latter was born January 14, 1890, a graduate 
of the Fairmount public schools and the Fairmount Academy, now living 
at home with his father and mother, and working as a lineman for the 
local telephone company. 

Earl Morris was born at Marion, June 13, 1886. His early life until 
he was eight years old was passed withiu the limits of his uative city 
and he began attending school there. Later he was a student in the Fair- 
mount public schools, and graduated from the graded school in 1901, 
and from the Fairmount Academy in the German Scientific and Teach- 
er's Courses. His first regular position in life was as a teacher, and he 
followed that vocation actively for seven years. Three years of this 
time were spent as principal at Fowlerton public school. In the fall of 
1911 Mr. Morris was elected town clerk and treasurer of Fairmount, 
and has given a most proficient administration of the duties of his 
office. He is a Republican in politics, and fraternally is affiliated with 
Fairmount Lodge No. 635, F. & A. M., having formerly been a secre- 
tary of the lodge, ilr. Morris is unmarried. 

JosiAH WiNSLOW. The Winslow family was the second to settle in 
Fairmount township. The time of their coming was two years before 
the organization of Grant county, and as substantial North Carolina 
Quakers they did much to influence other families of their faith and 
general social character to locate in the same community. Josiah 
Winslow is of the third generation in Grant county, is a native of Fair- 
mount township, and his active career was spent here and in other 
nearby sections of the state. His home is now in Fairmount, where he 
lives retired after a long and successful career in farming. Mrs. Wins- 
low, his wife, is a highly intellectual woman, and for many years has 
been identified with official affairs in the Quaker church, being one of 
the preachers in that society. 

The Winslow family for a number of generations during the eight- 
eenth century lived in Randolph county. North Carolina. It was estab- 
lished in America when three brothers landed from the Mayflower at 
Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1620. One of these brothers has become 
a familiar name to all American school children as a governor of the 
old ilassachusetts Bay Colony. One of them went south and became 
the founder of the family in the Carolinas, and from that line has come 
the present Grant county family. 

Joseph Winslow, grandfather of Josiah. was born in Randolph 
county. North Carolina, at Back Creek Meeting, about 1780. He was 
there ' married to Penina Charles, likewise of an old family and both 
were strict adherents of the Fox Quaker sect. After all their children 
had been boi-n, they loaded their possessions into wagons and with 
teams of horses crossed the Blue Ridge Mountain, journeyed day after 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 513 

day through the valleys and prairies and woods to the west of the 
Alleghanies, and finally arrived in Fairmount township of Grant county, 
though the country had no such names at that time, in November, 1829. 
As previously stated, Joseph Winslow was the second settler in Fair- 
mount township. His selection of land was made on the west side of 
a little stream which he called Back Creek, thus transplanting a familiar 
name from North Carolina. His first shelter was a log house, con- 
structed entirely without iron or steel, wooden pins and the familiar 
"tongue and groove" being employed to join the timbers. Later a 
two-story double hewed log house was erected and there the family lived 
for a good many years. During 1855-56 Henry Winslow, our subject's 
father, built a commodious frame house, and there Joseph "Winslow 
lived until his death in September of either 1858 or 1859. He was at 
that time about eighty years of age. The homestead of one hundred 
and sixty acres which he had entered from the government, and which 
his labors had transformed from a wilderness to an improved farm has 
since passed out of his immediate family, and is now occupied by Ancil 
Winslow, of the same name, but no iimnediate relative. Joseph Win- 
slow played a very conspicuous part in early affairs in his community. 
His leadership was effective in the organization of the first Quaker 
meeting, the first church services were held in his house. This society 
has now for many years been the Back Creek Friends church, in which 
both he and his wife were prominent. The wife of Joseph Winslow 
died many years before him. They had a family of five sons aud three 
daughters, namely: John, Seth, Matthew, Daniel, Sarah (SaUie), Caro- 
line, aud Nancy, all of whom were married and had children, aud lived 
aud died in Indiana with the exception of Matthew whose death occurred 
in Iowa ; Henry, who was the youngest and the father of Josiah. 

Henry Winslow was born in Randolph county. North Carolina, 
September 11, 1813, and died in Rush county, Indiana, in October, 
1887. He was sixteen years old when the familj- moved to Grant 
county, and the old homestead in Fairmount township was the scene 
of his industrious activities until after the death of his mother, and he 
eventually became owner of the place. He lived there until 1864, and 
then took his family to Rush county where he bought eighty-four acres 
of land. That was his home until his death, and his characteristics as 
a hard worker, a good neighbor and as one who advocated and practiced 
the laurel virtues, he always had an influential part in his community, 
lu politics he was a Republican until 1884, and then joined the Prohi- 
bition party and voted for Governor St. John of Kansas, who was 
nominee for president on that party ticket. Before the Civil war he 
had been au equallj- strong prohibitionist, and his home was one of the 
stations on the underground railway. He himself had many times kept 
a black slave concealed about his premises during the daj' and had car- 
ried him by night to the next station. Henry Winslow was married 
in Rush county to Miss Anna Binford, who was born in Randolph 
county, North Carolina, in 1816. She died at the old Winslow home- 
stead iu Fairmount township in September, 1863. Both she and her 
husband were active in the Quaker church. Her father, Micajah Bin- 
ford, of an old North Carolina Quaker family of English stock, died in 
Rush county, Indiana, when nearly ninety years of age. The ten chil- 
dren of Henry Winslow and wife are named as follows : Micajah B. died 
in Kansas in the prime of his life, leaving a family of children. Levi 
is married and a farmer in Mill township, of Grant county. Emily 
married Barker Hockett aud died in Colorado, leaving a number of 
children. Jonathan is now a retired farmer iu Leavenworth county, 
Kansas, and has a family. Ruth died the wife of Enos Hill, by whom 



514 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

she left three living children. Sarah died at the age of two years. 
Joseph and Josiah were twins, and the former is now a preacher in the 
Friends church in the state of Oklahoma, and has a family of children 
by his wife, who died twelve years ago. William died unmarried at 
the age of tweutj'-one. Mary was the wife of James Baker, and at her 
death left tive children. 

Josiah Winslow was born on his father's homestead in Fairmount 
township, September 13, 1849. All the children were born there. The 
first fifteen years of his life were spent in Grant county, and his educa- 
tion was received chiefly in the old Back Creek schoolhouse. Later he 
attended school for a time at the Walnut Ridge school in Rush county. 
His career as a farmer has been spent in Rush county, in Blackford 
county, and in Grant county. In May, 1912, Mr. Winslow retired from 
active pursuits, and moved to Fairmount. 

His first wife, whom he married in Marion county was Mary Pruitt, 
who was born there in 1848. Her death occurred in 1876 in Grant 
county, and her one son, William, died at the age of four years. For 
his second wife Mr. Winslow married Mrs. Abigail Bogue, whose maiden 
name was Cox, a daughter of WiUiam Cox, of the Cox family so promi- 
nent in Grant county, and whose histories are given elsewhere in these 
pages. Mrs. Winslow was born in Fairmount township, October 24, 
1847. By her marriage to Jonathan Bogue she had seven children, 
named as follows : William S. Bogue, who lives in Marion, where he 
is a carpenter, married Anna Thackery, and has two children, Edwin 
and ^Milton and by a former marriage also has two children, Banna 
Mandola and Howard; Eli G. Bogue died in early childhood; Lentine 
is the wife of Willard Allen of Marion, and has one son, Harry ; John 
L. lives in Los Angeles, California, and by his marriage to Zelma Haves 
has two children. Neva and Olive ; Laurel C, whose home is in Marion, 
married Hazel Hackelman, and has a daughter Margaret E., and by a 
former marriage has a son. Laurel R. ; Otto G. is a miner at Kirby, Ore- 
gon, and spent six years as a soldier, serving in the Spanish American 
'ar; Jlilton C. is unmarried and is chef in a hotel at Berkeley, Cali- 
fornia; J. Burl operates a diamond drill in mines at Monmouth, Cal- 
ifornia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Winslow and family are members of the Friends 
Church, and as already stated, Mrs. Winslow has been for twenty-five 
years a minister of the faith. Mr. Winslow was for many years an 
elder, and in politics is a Prohibitionist. 

ZiMRi C. OsBORN. The Osborn farm in section three of Fairmount 
township is one of the old estates of Grant county, and has been the 
home of Zimri C. Osborn for nearly forty years. He comes of a family 
which has been identified with eastern Indiana, since pioneer days and 
is himself a Grant county native, whose memory goes back to the years 
before the first railroads were constructed in this locality. It has been 
his privilege to witness a remarkable development of all the modern 
facilities of life and industry, and in his home community his part has 
been that of an industrious, honorable, and intelligent citizen. 

The Osborn family back in North Carolina, lived either in Ran- 
dolph or Guilford county. His grandfather Peter Osborn was born in 
one of those counties, owned some land and did farming on a small 
scale, but his regular occupation was that of skilled mechanic and wheel- 
wright. His life was prolonged to old age, and he passed away in his 
native county and state. His brother Charles Osborn was one of the 
most famous Quaker preachers in the early part of the nineteenth cen- 
tury, and extended mention of his career is printed in many books and 
can be found in standard collections of early American biographies. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 515 

Peter Osborn married a North Carolina girl, and they had a number 
of children. 

Henry Osborn, father of Zimri C. was born in North Carolina, May 
9, 1804, grew up in his native county, acquired a large part of his 
father's genius for mechanics, and while never following the trade 
regularly was able to make anything that could be fashioned with 
carpenter's tools. Practically all his household furniture was manu- 
factured by his own hands. He married, in North Carolina, Miss Mary 
Parson, who was born in that vicinity, and died in Grant county, 
Indiana. Her mother was a member of an old-school Baptist church. 
Mary Osborn was born about 1810, and was the second wife of Henry 
Osborn. His first wife was a Miss Wheeler, who died a few years after 
their marriage, leaving a sou, Alveron. By the second marriage Henry 
Osborn and wife had one sou, Jonathan, born in North Carolina. Then, 
with his mfe and two sous, he started north, and one horse drew the 
wagon across the Blue Ridge Mountains and over the long distance in- 
tervening between North Carolina and Indiana. After a journey of 
some iive or six weeks, they lauded in Fairmount township, of Grant 
county, finding a location Ijetween Glacier Lake and the Mississinewa 
River. There he lived on the old McCormick land, and also entered 
forty acres of government land. Later, by trading and purchase, he 
acquired property near the village of Fairmount, where he and his wife 
spent the rest of their days. Henry Osborn died in 1886, at the age 
of eighty-two, and his wife survived and passed away when seventy- 
eight. Their church was the Methodist, and for some years he had been 
a class leader. They were honored and substantial people, always held 
in high respect in their community. Henry Osborn is remembered 
as a skilled Nimrod, and the old gun with which he had killed many 
deer, wild turkey, and other game, is now owned as a prized heirloom 
by his son Zimri. In politics he was most of his life a Democrat. The 
children of Henry Osborn were as follows: Alveron, mentioned as the 
child of his first marriage, enlisted as a Union soldier, and died of ill- 
ness while in Kentucky, leaving a wife and children. Jonathan, the 
first child of the second marriage, was born in North Carolina, was 
married four times, and had children by two of his wives; he died at 
the age of sixty-two. Emeline became the wife of William G. Lewis, 
prominent among the old settlers of Grant county and equally noted as 
a hunter, a class leader and preacher in the Methodist church, having 
assisted in the organization of the church in Fairmount township, and 
as a farmer. William G. Lewis died about five years ago, while his 
widow is still living. Louisa J., first married James G. Payne, and is 
now Mrs. Charles Thom of Fairmount township, and is the mother of 
a number o'f children. Emma and John both died in childhood. William 
whose home is in Missouri has children by his first wife. The seventh 
child is Zimri C. Rachael died in the prime of life after her marriage 
to Milton Brewer, leaving no children. 

Zimri C. Osborn was born in .Fairmount township, March 2, 1845. 
His early training was received in this locality and his education was 
acquired by the somewhat primitive country schools of that day. All 
his life has been spent in Fairmount township, and farming with him 
has been a business pursued both profitably and pleasantly. In 1875 
he bought the land in his home farm, amounting to one hundred and 
ten acres, lying in section two and section thirty-four, his residence 
being on section two. The improvements are of the best class, including 
a good eight-room house and a large barn, and one of the features about 
the place which distinguishes it from many of its neighbors is a large 
orchard, where he raises quantities of apples, peaches, plums, cherries, 



516 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

etc. His general crops are oats, wheat and com, and he feeds most of 
them to his own stock. 

Mr. Osboru was first married in Fairmount township to Miss Nancy 
Leach, daughter of John Leach. She was born in this section of Grant 
county, :May 17, 1849, and died at her home, May 24, 1893. She be- 
longed to the Methodist Protestant church. Her children were as fol- 
lows: John, a farmer in Rush county, Indiana, who married Clara 
Dugan, and they have one son, Luther. William, who lives on a farm 
in Fairmount township, married Lela Davis, and they had one son, 
Clyde, now deceased. Emeliue, died at the age of three months. Louisa 
is the wife of Ellsworth Smith, a farmer, and their three children are 
Claude, Rosa, and Evert. Jane, is the wife of John Ayers, of Rush 
county, Indiana, a farmer, and they have as children, Maybell, Edna, and 
Irene. Cooper is a farmer in Whitley county, Indiana, and by his 
marriage to Ida Cash has four children, Arthur, Roy, Jesse, and Edna. 
Edmond whose home is in Fairmount township, married Nora Kirk- 
patrick and has a son Charles. Rachael, who lives with her father is 
the widow of Frank Monohan, and her two children are Ovid and 
Gladys. 

The present wife of Mr. Osborn was a Georgian girl, Miss Martha 
Blair. They were married December 9, 1897. Mrs. Osborn was born 
in Georgia, in 1852, was reared and educated there, and her parents 
were Huston and Eliza (Yarber) Blair. Her father was bom in 
Tennessee in 1831, and died in Georgia, in 1910, while her mother was 
born in South Carolina in 1823, and died in 1885. They were members 
of the Missionary Baptist church, in which Mr. Blair was a deacon. Mr. 
and j\Irs. Osborn are both verj^ prominent members and workers in the 
IMethodist Protestant church of Fairmount township. Mr. Osborn has 
been a class leader, exhorter, and is the oldest member of the society 
in this locality, having taken much part in the organization and the 
upbuilding of the church for many years. In politics he is a Prohibi- 
tionist. 

John W. Jones. About twenty-five years ago, after he had grown 
up in Grant county, had a practical experience on a farm, and had by hard 
work and close economy acquired a little capital, John W, Jones bought 
the laud contained in his present homestead on section thirtj^ of 
Jefferson township, ilr. Jones is a prosperous man, owns a fine farm, 
runs it in a business-like way, and is not only a man of independence 
and standing on his own ground, but anywhere in that community is 
looked upon with the esteem and respect which are paid to a citizen 
whose relations with the community have always been on a high plane 
of honor and integrity. ' 

This branch of the Jones family was established in Grant county 
many years ago by Joshua Jones, father of John W. Joshua was tlie son 
of Lewis Jones, who lived and died in Ohio, was twice married, and had 
children by both wives. Joshua Jones, a son of the first marriage of his 
father, was born in Greene county, Ohio, March 31, 1S19, and grew up 
on his father's farm. When he was about twenty years of age he crossed 
the state line into Indiana, and being a young man without capital, he 
found employment among the farmers of Blackford county, for several 
years. Then moving into Jefferson township of Grant county, he bought 
some land, most of it located in the wilderness which still covered most 
of this region, and by hard work cleared up and made a good farm. That 
was his home for nearly sixty years, and at his death in August, 1909, 
he was able to look back upon a lifetime of industry and gratifying 
accomplishment. He was a Democrat, and a member of the Methodist 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 517 

Episcopal church. Joshua Jones was married in JefEersou township of 
Grant county to Miss ilalinda Owiugs, who was born in Ohio, and came 
with her father Nicholas Owiugs, when a j'oung child to Jefferson town- 
ship. Mrs. Joshua Jones died on the old homestead in Jefferson town- 
ship in 1905. She was an active member of the Methodist church. There 
were nine children, eight of whom she reared to adult age, and one Mary 
J., died in young womanhood. Those living are as follows: Harriet, the 
widow of Michael Houck, lives at Upland, without children; Lydia, is 
the widow of Edwin Fergus and lives in California,, having a sou and 
a daughter; Lewis M. is a farmer of Jefferson township, and has four 
daughters, all of whom are married ; the next in line is John "W. George 
"W. is a retired farmer, and conducts a feed store in Upland, is married 
and has two daughters, both of whom in turn are married ; Thomas Lee 
lives in Jonesboro, and his sou is married ; Sarah E. is the wife of William 
Ginn, a farmer in Jefferson township, and they are the parents of two 
sons. 

John W. Jones was born in Jefferson township, Jime 20, 1851. As a 
boy he saw much that was characteristic of pioneer life, and within his 
youthful recollection the first railroad was built through Grant county. 
His education was acquired in the district schools, and his home was with 
his parents, until he reached manhood. As already stated, in 1887 he 
bought eighty acres of his present place, and he now owns one hundred 
acres of highly improved and Avell cultivated land. With the passing of 
years he has introduced many improvements, and in 1903 erected the 
comfortable and substantial nine-room house, a fine white building, which 
makes an attractive picture in the midst of the shade and fruit trees 
surrounding it. Mr. Jones is a stock grower, and keeps livestock of only 
the better grades on his place. 

In Fairmount township in 1877, occurred the marriage of John W. 
Jones and Terissa Moorman. Sirs. Jones was born in Fairmount town- 
ship, August 18, 1849, and her home has been in Grant county with the 
exception of three years, spent in Illinois and Iowa. Her parents are 
Lewis and Sarah jMoorman, and the Moorman family long prominent in 
Grant county, received full treatment in the sketch of Levi Moorman, 
found elsewhere on these pages. Mr. and ]Mrs. Jones are the parents of 
seven children, named as follows : Gertrude, wife of Esley Thorn, farm- 
ers of Delaware county, and with one daughter, Geneva ; Oscar, who lives 
at home and helps run the farm, and is unmarried; L. J., a farmer in 
Jlissouri, who married ilina Johnson, and has a daughter, Mildred P.; 
Eva, wife of Clyde R. Partridge, of Fowlerton, and has one child, Myron ; 
Minnie and Frank, who died in early childhood; and Lora B., who was 
well educated in the township schools, and now lives at home. 

William Keevek. The Progress Farm is the name of the rural 
homestead occupied by William Keever and family in section six of 
Fairmount township, on the rural delivery route number twentj'-one 
out of Fairmount. The place is well named and progressive methods 
are everywhere in evidence. Mr. Keever applies business sense and 
judgment to every operation on his estate and few business houses in 
Grant county are run any more systematically or with greater net profit 
according to the investment than the Progress Farm. The Keever 
family have been identified with Grant county for more than seventy 
years, and a number of its members are well known citizens. 

The grandfather of William Keever was Adam Keever, a native of 
Pennsylvania, of old German stock which settled in that province 
probably during the early colonial era. Adam Keever grew up on a 
farm, took that as his occupation and married a Pennsylvania girl. 



518 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

The most, if not all of their childi'en were born in Pennsylvania. About 
the year 1828 Adam Keever and family moved west and located for 
some years in Ohio and later became pioneer settlers in Randolph 
county, Indiana, where he entered laud, improved a farm from the 
wilderness, and died there at the venerable age of eighty-eight years. 
His first wife had died many years previously, at the age of sixty. By 
a later marriage Adam Keever had two children. 

Daniel C. Keever, a sou of Adam, and father of WiUiam Keever, 
was born in Pennsylvania, July 3, 1816, and was twelve years of age 
when the family came to Ohio. He was the oldest of three sons, his two 
brothers being Adam Jr., and (Jeorge. There were a number of sisters. 
Daniel C. Keever was reared in Randolph county on his father's farm, 
and after becoming of age married Elizabeth J. Asher. While he came 
from Pennsylvania, her birthplace was in the old commonwealth of 
Virginia, where she was born January IS, 1819, a daughter of Virginia 
people who moved to Randolph couuty, Indiana, among the early settlers 
there. Elizabeth at the time of this removal was a child. Later her 
parents moved to Ohio, and died in Fayette couuty, when in old age. 
They were in religion Methodists. The marriage of Daniel C. Keever 
and wife occurred about 1840, and in that year they moved to Grant 
county. The county was still new aud undeveloped, much of the land 
had never been touched by the hand of civilization, and Mr. Keever 
entered one hundred and sixty acres in Monroe township. His industry 
resulted in the improvement of an excellent farm and he continued a 
prosperous farmer, quiet citizen and a man of influence until his death 
in 1895. His wife preceded him in death ou September 12, 1876. In 
many respects Daniel C. Keever was a remarkable man. Without edu- 
cational advantages, his native ability enabled him to succeed far above 
the average, aud he was never at disadvantage in his association aud rela- 
tions with his fellows. Bj- his iudustry and good judgment, he accumu- 
lated an estate of six hundred acres, aud died comparatively wealthy. 
In local aifairs his influence was strong, and he was during his career 
one of the best known Republicans in Monroe township, assisting many 
of his friends to ofSce, though never an aspirant for political honors 
himself. His judgment was often trusted in the settlement of estates, 
and in other ways much honor was sho'mi to him by his fellow citizens. 
During the early years of the family residence in Grant count}', his 
wife showed her individual capability as a good pioneer housemother 
by spinning and weaving practicality all the clothes worn by members 
of the household. She was especially skillful in this kind of work, aud 
some of the articles made by her are still kept as precious heirlooms 
by her descendants. One or two of those articles now existing are sixty 
years old, and Mr. William Keever has one example of her handiwork. 
Daniel Keever was a Quaker in religion and his wife probably held to 
the same convictions. 

Mr. WiUiam Keever was the fifth in a family of eight sons and one 
daughter, and their names and brief mention of their individual careers 
are given as follows: 1. Addison, who died July 11, 1913, in Upland, 
Grant county, was a retired farmer during his latter years and left two 
children. His widow still resides at Uplaud. 2. Martin, now living 
retired on his farm in Smith county. Kansas, had ten children, his wife 
being now deceased. 3. Eliza, died at the age of thirteen years. 
4. George, who died December 8, 1912, lived some years as a retired 
farmer in Smith county, Kansas, and his widow still has her home there, 
the mother of eleven children. 5. John is a farmer on the old home- 
stead in Monroe township, and had three children, one of whom is now 
deceased. 6. William is next in order of the children. 7. Frank, who is 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 519 

married and a farmer in Monroe township, has four children living. 
8. Walter, now lives in Upland, a retired farmer, and has two sons and 
two daughters. 9. Elmer is still actively engaged in farming in Monroe 
township and has one son. 

William Keever was born on his father's farm in Monroe township, 
February 15, 1852. His early training was that of a farmer, and the 
facilities of the common schools in his neighborhood supplied him with 
his book learning. Since he reached his majority all his energies have 
been directed along the line of farming, and he has been a resident of 
Fairmount township since 1879. In that year he bought one hundred 
and thirteen acres of fertile land, though with few improvements, in 
sections five and six. Years of toil and good management have made this 
a beautiful and valuable estate. There are two large barns, one for stock 
and one for grain. With the exception of twelve acres of native timber, 
all the land is in cultivation, and there is practically no waste land, and 
everything responds to the enterprising management of Mr. Keever. 
The character of substantial comfort is everywhere evident, and a large 
house of ten rooms nicely painted white is the pleasant home of the 
Keevers. Almost every kind of cereal crops is grown on his land, with 
a high average of production per acre. 

Mr. Keever was married in Jefferson township of Grant county to 
Miss Sarah E. Marine, who was born in that township, September 12, 
1858, and educated there. Her parents were Jonathan and Mary (Fore- 
hand) Marine, the former born in Wayne county, Indiana, May 26, 
1831, and the latter in Grant county in 1842. Mrs. Marine died in 1865, 
both she and her husband being Quakers in religion. Their respective 
parents came to Indiana from North Carolina. Mr. Marine, who is still 
living, though now retired, making his home with Mrs. Keever, has had 
a life of industry as a farmer, passed chiefly in Jefferson township. He 
has been three times married and all his wives are now deceased. Mr. 
Marine in politics is a Democratic voter. 

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Keever are: Iva E., is the wife of 
Omer Harris, now a farmer in Delaware county, Indiana, and they have 
a daughter, Irene. Auda Jay is a graduate of the University of Michi- 
gan in 1907, was at once admitted to the bar, and has since been in 
successful practice of his profession at Jonesboro, this county. He 
married Etta Gift, but they have no children. Hanson, who was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Grant county, is a farmer in Sims county, 
married Cora Michales and has a daughter, Margarite. Ethel is the 
wife of Burnett Aired, and lives in Fairmount city. Two of the children 
of Mr. and Mrs. Keever died in infancy, one of them being named Cleo. 
For their church affiliation Mr. and Mrs. Keever worship with the 
Friends, and in polities he is a Prohibitionist. 

Milton T. Cox. In section thirty of Fairmount township is located 
a small rural farmstead of eighteen acres, which might well be con- 
sidered a model of its kind, and one of the most profitable and best man- 
aged small farms in Grant county. It is the home of Milton T. Cox and 
family. Mr. Cox was born in the vicinity of Fairmount, December 20, 
1854, of an old family whose members will be noted in the following 
paragraph. Mr. Cox has always lived within a few miles of his birth- 
place, which was in Liberty township, and has devoted himself to general 
farming, but with special attention to fruit growing. The Cox farm 
has almost every variety of fruit that can be grown in this section. 
There are no haphazard methods employed on the Cox place, and every 
bit of ground is put to some profitable use. Mr. Cox has a considerable 
part of his farm in orchards, and has done much in the way of growing 



520 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

small fruits. Throughout this section of the county, the Cox farm is 
known as Fruitland. In the midst of the perfect bower of trees which 
surroiind it, stands a fine modern dwelling of a quiet drab color, and 
containing eight rooms. Mr. Cox built this home in 1903. As a man 
who has succeeded well in his chosen industry, Mr. Cox is of the opinion 
that fruit growing is very profitable when properly handled, and is an 
industry which has been much neglected and should receive more atten- 
tion in this favored climatic region of Indiana. 

The grandparents of Milton T. Cox were Joshua and Rachael Cox, 
both natives of Randolph county. North Carolina, and Quakers in 
religion. They reared their family in the same faith. In 1830, the 
grandparents accomplished the long journey westward to Indiana, and 
settled in Morgan county, where they improved some land from the 
wilderness in the vicinity of Monrovia. There Joshua Cox died a few 
years later when in middle life. His widow survived him some ten 
years, and died at the old homestead about 1846. 

In the meantime, their son William, father of Milton T. Cox, had 
grown up and settled in Grant county. William Cox was born in North 
Carolina in 1824, and was six years of age when the family moved to 
Morgan county, Indiana. He was twenty-two years of age when his 
mother died, and had been recently married. There were no railroads 
between Grant county and Morgan county at that time, and the only 
means of travel were by horseback. When the news came of the impend- 
ing death of his mother, he and his young wife mounted on the back of 
their only horse, and rode as rapidly as possible to the old home in 
Morgan county, hoping to see her before her death. The distance was 
nearly ninety miles and, owing to the slow progress of their horse, they 
arrived after the burial. William Cox had been reared in Morgan 
county, and when about twenty years of age came to Grant county to 
visit his uncle and aunt, i\Ir. and Mrs. Spencer Reeder, well known old 
pioneers of this section. While in their home he was introduced by his 
uncle to Betsey or Elizabeth Wilson. Miss Wilson was the belle of that 
neighborhood, and while she had numerous suitors among the country 
youth of Grant county, she soon acknowledged her attraction and choice 
of the stranger, William Cox. The latter went home to Morgan county, 
but did not remain long and soon came to Grant county to claim Miss 
Wilson as his wife. Elizabeth Wilson was born in Noi-th Carolina in 
1826, a daughter of John Wilson, who brought his familj^ north to 
Indiana, and located in Fairmount township in 1836. There John 
Wilson and wife lived the rest of their lives, and died when quite old. 
After their marriage William Cox and wife started life as farmers in 
a log cabin home in Liberty township. Their equipment was exceed- 
ingly limited, and, as already stated, they had only a single horse to 
perform the laboi's of cultivation. Their lonely cabin was situated on 
the edge of an Indian reservation, sparsely settled by white people, and 
it requires little imagination to understand how completel.y both the 
young girl and her husband were shut out from all social privileges and 
advantages. They were surrounded by the wilderness and wild animals 
still roamed at large, their horse being frequently frightened at night 
by the screams of a panther which skulked about the home. A few 
years later he bought and improved a farm in Fairmount township 
■which he sold, then bought another homestead in Liberty township, and 
there continued his labors until he had made a splendid farm, well up 
to the standards of Grant county at that time. He was the owner of 
one hundred aci'es, and the united industry of himself and wife brought 
it to rank among the best country estates in the township. In 1873, 
William Cox built a fine brick house, considered at that time one of the 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 521 

best in the county. There they lived the remainder of their peaceful 
lives, and his death occurred January 25, 1901, while she survived him 
only a few months and passed away June 12tli of the same year. Both 
wei'e members of the Quaker church, but were not married in the church, 
as required by the church rules, the ceremony being performed by his 
uncle, Spencer Reeder, who was a Justice of the Peace. They refused 
to express sorrow for the act and were disowned by the Society, and 
subsequently he and his wife became charter members of the Wesleyan 
Methodist church at Upper Back Creek. Thej^ both gave their allegiance 
to that faith throughout the remainder of their lives. 

Milton T. Cox was reared and educated in a substantial way, had the 
environment of a good home and upright parents, and started out in 
life as a farmer and fruit grower. On November 24, 1881, in Fairmount 
he married Miss Martha E. Petty, who was born in Henry county, 
Indiana, June 9, 1862. She moved with her parents, Robert and Rachael 
(Vestal) Petty, to Madison county, Indiana, in 1870. In 1876 the 
family came to Grant county, locating on a farm near Little Ridge, in 
Liberty township. Her father, though not a land owner, was a very 
successful farmer. Her father died at the home of a daughter in 
Indianapolis, IMay 14, 1900, while the mother passed away January 8, 
1898, at Summitville, in Madison county, Indiana. For a number of 
years they had worshipped in the United Brethren Church, but their 
last years were spent as Methodists. 

The children of Milton T. Cox and wife are mentioned as follows: 
Muriel Joy, born March 2, 1885, was educated at Fairmount, and is 
the wife of Ernest T. Pearson of Indianapolis, and they have one son, 
Leonard E., born January 19, 1905. Eva Delight, born March 23, 1888, 
married Thomas Jenkins of Indianapolis, and their two living children 
are : Ronda, born December 5, 1907, and Ruth, born November 3, 1909. 
Garfield Vestal, the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Cox, was bom May 4, 
1893, and though but twenty years of age has made a splendid record 
for himself. Educated in the Fairmount high school and academy, he 
received the highest grade issued by that institution, and is now a 
student in the Earlham college. Garfield Cox has prepared the article 
on foresti-y published in this history of Grant county. From early 
bojdiood his interests and tastes have gone to trees, and he has won 
laurels in state work on forestry. He is also an orator of no mean 
ability, and while a sophomore in Fairmount Academy won the ora- 
torical contest among the Friends Academies of the states of Indiana 
and Illinois. IMr. and Mrs. Cox are both members of the Wesleyan 
Methodist church. 

William A. Beasley. After a long and honorable career as a 
merchant in Fairmount, Mr. Beasley is now enjoying the peace and 
quiet pursuits of country life at his home in section thirty of Fairmount 
township, on the old Thomas estate. Mr. Beasley bought the Thomas 
farm on retiring from business, and thus enjoys ownership and occu- 
pancy of one of the landmarks in this section of Grant county. A large 
and comfortable brick house was constinicted many years ago by Mr. 
Thomas, and the brick and sand entering into its construction were both 
materials taken from the farm, and manufactured on the place. The 
success of Mr. Beasley in business affairs has been equaled by his 
iufluential and public spirited citizenship, and his reputation has always 
been that of a reliable upright citizen, ever ready to do his part in 
bearing community responsibilities, and forwarding enterprise for the 
local good. 

William A. Beasley is a grandson of George W. and Sarah (Stanley) 



522 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Beasley. It is not known where these grandparents were born, but 
they were probably married in Tennessee, and most of their lives were 
spent on a farm east of Petersburg in Lincoln county, Tennessee. 
Finally thej' settled just outside the town limits of Petersburg on the 
west side, and died there, the grandfather when about seventy, and the 
grandmother when about sixty-seven years of age. They were farmers 
by occupation, members of the Methodist church and thrifty and 
esteemed people. Of their children, the following record is made: 
Anderson, deceased; Thomas, who is still living; William, deceased; 
George; John, father of the Fairmouut citizen; ilartha, deceased; 
Catherine; Tina; Louella, deceased. All these children grew up and 
were married and most of them had their homes in Tennessee. Those 
now deceased all passed away in that state. 

John Beasley, who was second in order of birth, was born near 
Petersburg, Tennessee, in 1840, and died there in 1864, when only 
twenty-four years of age. His active career was spent in farming. He 
married in his native locality. Miss Susan E. Keith, who was born in 
Lincoln county, Tennessee, about 1840, and died in Fairmount, March 
11, 1911. After the death of her first husband she never married. Her 
parents were Francis W. and Bethia (George) Keith, both natives of 
Tennessee, where they were farmers and Methodists and died when 
quite old. In 1875, Mrs. John Beasley brought her only son William to 
Indiana, being preceded to this state by her sister and husband, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. A. Brown. In 1879, she came to Fainnount. 

William A. Beasley was born in Lincoln county, Tennessee, April 11, 
1864, and practically all his education was obtained after he came to 
Grant county. His advantages were quite liberal while he was growing 
up, and he took a full course in the city schools. His first business 
experience was as a partner with J. H. Wilson at Fairmount, but after 
a year he sold his interest to Mr. Wilson and then became a clerk for 
Ezra N. Oakley. His connection with Mr. Oakley continued for six 
years, at the end of which time he bought a drug store, and during the 
first year was in partnership with Edward Cassell. ilr. Cassell was 
then unfortunately drowned, and Mr. Beasley bought all the interest 
and conducted the store as sole proprietor for twenty-three and a half 
years. In the meantime he had prospered steadily, and when he sold 
his business he possessed the means of enabling him to put some of his 
long-cherished plans, principal among which was the acquisition of a 
place in the countiy. Thus in 1913, having bought the Thomas estate 
west of the city of Fairmount, he moved to that old home, and now has 
a fine fai-m of one hundred acres. He gives all his attention to the 
management of this estate, and is applying the business judgment and 
ability acquired through a long experience as a merchant to the culti- 
vation of land, and its resources. 

In Fairmount to^vuship Mr. Beasley married Miss Emma Rush, a 
daughter of Rev. Nixon Rush, whose career is detailed on other pages 
of this work. Mrs. Beasley was born, reared, and educated in Fair- 
mount township and city, and completed her education at the Fairmount 
Academy. She is the mother of six children, namely: Zola B., was 
educateci in the Fairmount high school and academy, the Earlhara 
College, and the Marion Business College, and is now taking a special 
normal course at Rochester, New York; Myron R., is a graduate of the 
Fairmount high school, the Marion Business College, and is assistant 
teller and bookkeeper for the Farmers Trust & Savings Bank at ]\Iarion : 
Oren Keith, died at the age of fourteen months; Frank Adrian, is a 
member of the Fairmount Academy Class of 1915: John Otis, is a 
student in the Fairmount Academy; and Louisa Elizabeth is in the 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 523 

public school. Mrs. Beasley and children are members of the Friends 
church. 

William Ginn. On section fifteen of Jefferson township is located 
the attractive rural estate of William Ginn, who has lived in this county 
for more than forty years, and stands high among his neighbors and 
friends for his success as a farmer and stock raiser, and for his kindlj^ 
and useful relations with those who live in the same circle of social 
neighborhood. 

Mr. Ginn comes of Irish stock. His grandfather William Ginn, was 
born in Ireland, and in young manhood emigrated to America, first set- 
tling in Virginia. In that state he married and he and his bride came on 
to Indiana and settled in Henry county when the country was still new. 
Henry county was his home until his death, and he and his wife were 
about threescore and ten when they passed away. They were both Prot- 
estants in religion. His sons were: James, Joseph, John, Job, William, 
and Ezekiel. Their daughters were Nancy, Sarilda, Elsie, and Polly, 
all these children having married and having families except John, who 
was wounded as a Union soldier in the battle at Richmond, Kentucky, 
and died of gangrene. Job and William were likewise soldiers and saw 
service from the beginning to the end of the struggle. 

Ezekiel, father of William Ginn, was a married man at the time of the 
Civil war and he had volunteered his services to put down the Rebellion. 
In 1863 he enlisted in the Ninth Indiana Cavalry in Henry county, and 
served until the war was over. Part of the time he was on detailed duty. 
Not knowing that Ezekiel Ginn had already enlisted, they drafted him, 
but he had already been gone two weeks and was with them in Nashville, 
Tennessee. After the war he continued to live on his farm in Henry 
county until February, 1869, and then moved to Grant county. Two 
years were spent in Pairmount township, and in the fall of 1870 he moved 
to Jefferson, where his wife died on October 15, 1875. She was born in 
Maryland in 1833, and her maiden name was Sally Nicodemus. She was 
still young when she came to Indiana, and her father died in Henry 
county, while her mother later moved to Fulton county and died at the 
age of eighty-seven years. The latter 's maiden name was Catherine 
Eckers, who was born in Bremen, Germany, and her parents emigrated 
and settled in Baltimore, Maryland, where she lived until they came out 
to Henry county. After the death of his first wife Ezekiel Ginn married 
Betsie Aldred, and a year later, in 1878, went to Independence, Kansas, 
where he died when seventy-eight years of age. His wife passed away 
some years later. 

Mr. William Ginn was one of twins, and he has two brothers and 
three sisters living, all of whom are now married. He was born on a farm 
in Henry county, Indiana, December 14, 1856. Part of his boyhood was 
spent in his native county, but he was only about thirteen years old when 
his family came to Grant county. Since the age of fifteen he has been 
practically self-supporting, and has made his o^vn way in the world. In 
1877 Mr. Ginn bought his present farm in section fifteen of Jefferson 
township, and has now a highly productive estate of eighty acres, im- 
proved with a comfortable, though not pretentious residence, and a 
place which on the whole represents a good return for his many years 
of steady and consistent labor and management. In Jefferson township 
Mr. Ginn married Miss Sarah Jones, who was born in Jefifei-son to^vn- 
ship February 3, 1860. Her home has been in this vicinity all her life. 
Her parents were Joshua and Malinda (Owings) Jones, who came to 
Grant county in 1840, and lived on a farm in Jefferson to\vnship, until 
their death. The father was from Greene county, Ohio, and the mother 



524 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

from Muskingum county, Ohio. They were married in Grant county 
in February, 1843. Her father was ninety-one years old when he 
died on August 12, 1909, and his wife passed away some eight years 
before at the age of eighty-six. ilr. and Mrs. Ginn have the following 
children : Joshua, born July 13, 1885, is a progressive youug farmer, 
and married Iva Fenton; Frank died in infancy; James A., born Decem- 
ber 19, 1891, is a graduate of the high school, and follows the i^rofessiou 
of electrician, being unmarried, iir. and Mrs. Ginn attend the Shiloh 
IMethodist Episcopal church and he and his sons are Republican voters. 

Pascal B. Smith. Though not among the oldest residents of Grant 
county, which has been his home since 1890, Mr. Smith has so effectively 
identified himself with the spirit and activities of the county that he is 
regarded as one of the most valued citizens. Mr. Smith is a big man, 
not only in physical proiJortions, but in character and heart, is big 
hearted, generous and hospitable, and at the same time a very practical 
and successful farmer, who believes in going ahead all the time. 

His ancestry is of old and substantial Virginia stock, Avhose members 
possessed the fine social characteristic of that old commonwealth, were 
loyal to the state through the Civil war, and as a rule were of the pros- 
perous planter class. The grandfather of Pascal B. Smith was Samuel 
Smith, born at Three Springs, in Washington county, Virginia, about 
1790. He died at a good old age in 1861. His life work was farming. 
He married Rachael Stinson, a neighbor girl, and a native of the same 
county, of old Virginia stock. She died twelve years after her husband 
in 1873. They were Methodists in religion, and had seven children, all 
of whom grew up and six were married and had children. One of the 
children never married because he remained at hom^ devoted to the 
welfare of his father and mother. The old homestead in Washington 
county is still owned by members of the family. 

Captain William Smith, the father of Pascal B., was born at Three 
Springs, Virginia, in 1821, and died near his birth place in July, 1907. 
Throughout his life he was a planter, and a man of unusual prominence 
in his section of Virginia. When the war broke out between the states, 
he enlisted and went to the front as captain in the Forty-eighth Virginia 
regiment. In the battle at Saltville, Vii'ginia, he was badly wounded. 
The gun which effected the wound carried a charge of a minie-ball and 
four buckshots, and the minie-ball and three of the buckshot took effect 
in him, while he was lying on the ground, one of the bullets striking his 
shoulder and others injuring his hand and fingers. This wound was 
given him about the close of the war and peace was declared about the 
time he got well. He had formerly served as captain of the local militia, 
and after the war was brevetted colonel of his home regiment of state 
militia. He also for many years served as a justice of the peace. In 
politics he was a Democrat, and was looked upon as a leader in the 
public life of his community. Near his old birth place. Captain Smith 
married Miss Darsey Fleener, who was born in that locality, about 1826, 
also representing an old Virginia family. She died in May, 1911. She 
was of the Lutheran faith in religion, and kept her membership with 
that church all her life. Her husband was a Methodist. They were the 
parents of twelve children, nine of whom grew up and are yet living. 
All are married and all have families of children. Two now live in 
Indiana. Pascal B. Smith has a sister, Margaret, the wife of Colonel 
Columbus Pullin, a resident of Muncie, Indiana, and they have seven 
living children. 

Pascal B. Smith, the oldest of the children, was born on the old 
Virginia homestead, February 24, 1852. His education was received 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 525 

in the common schools, and as he grew up he became acquainted by prac- 
tical experience with the activities of his father's farm. There he con- 
tinued to live until twenty-three j-ears of age. On July 4, 1875, just 
one year before the centennial celebration of American Independence, 
he married Elizabeth Gardner, a native of Scott county, Virginia, where 
she was born September 22, 1856. Her parents were Ural and Margaret 
(Baruhart) Gardner, natives of Scott county, where they lived and died 
prosjDerous farmers. Mr. Gardner was a California forty-niner, spend- 
ing more than three years on the western coast, and having exceptional 
fortune in mining and his other ventures. After returning to Virginia, 
he gave all his attention to the cultivation of a large plantation. He 
was born in 1810, and died August 17, 1890. His wife died Mai'ch 6, 
1904, when past eighty years of age. They Avere a Methodist family. 
Of the large family of children in the Gardner household, Mrs. Smith 
and a brother live in Indiana, the latter being J. Perry Gardner of 
Gas City in Grant county. 

After the marriage of Mr. Smith and wife, they lived on a farm in 
Virginia, until 1890. They then came to Grant county and located on 
the Schrader farm, near Jonesboro, and three years later took posses- 
sion and began operating one hundJi'ed and sixty acres in the Solomon 
Wise farm in section fifteen of Pairmount township. He has proved 
veiy successful in Grant county agriculture, grows large quantities of 
hay, clover, corn, oats and wheat, and with the exception of the wheat 
practically every pound of his crops is fed to the stock on the place. 
As already noted, ilr. Smith is a hustler, and one of the best farmers 
in this section of the county. 

He and his wife have seven sons and three daughters living, men- 
tioned as follows: 1. Stephen R., a farmer in Mill township, married 
Lillie Preener, without children. 2. Calvin D., who married Ethel 
Overman, lives on a farm in Jefferson township, and had two children, 
Virginia, and Ilene, the latter dying in infancy. 3. Charles L. is a 
farmer in Mill township, and by his marriage to Bertha Clay has three 
children, L. Vem, Virgil Lee, and Edgar R. 4. James C, who is fore- 
man in the Jonesboro Rubber Company, married Margaret Jones, and 
their two children are Warren H. and E. E. 5. Henry C. married 
Susan Swartz, lives in Jonesboro, and has a daughter, Delene. 6. Daisy 
E. was liberally educated in the grade and high schools, and is now 
living at home with her parents. 7. Maudella, a graduate of the high 
school, and the Marion Normal College, and holding a teacher's license, 
lives at home. 8. Woodie M. is a junior in the Pairmount Academy. 
9. Joseph L. attends the public school, and the youngest, Gladys D., is 
also a student. One child, Orville S., died at the age of twenty-eight 
years unmarried. Mr. and Mrs. Smith hold to no particular church, 
though their children attend the Methodist Protestant Sunday school. 
In polities he is a Democrat. 

Joseph A. Hollow ay. One of the most attractive and profitable of 
Grant county homesteads is that located in section twenty-seven of 
Pairmount township, and owned by Joseph A. Holloway, who is himself 
of a younger generation of the family in Grant county, and is an up-to- 
date citizen and progressive farmer, who has made agriculture a very 
profitable business. 

The family history of the Holloways begins with three brothers, who 
came from England during the colonial days, and one of them located 
in North Carolina. Of Quaker stock, the family in subsequent genera- 
tions have always been devoted to that church, and the descendants 
of the American settlers have been noted for their thrifty, their quiet, 



526 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

unassuming virtues, and a fine citizenship. First to be mentioned by 
name among the descendants of the first settler is Abuer Holloway, 
who married Elizabeth Stanley. They lived and died in North Carolina, 
were farmers and Quakers, and upright and excellent people. Their 
four children were Jesse, grandfather of Joseph A.; Isaac, Maria and 
Sarah, all of whom had families. 

Jesse Holloway was born about 1805. In his native state he was 
married on July 2, 1826, to Eleanor Hinshaw, who was born in the 
same county and state, February 25, 1810. After their marriage they 
started to win success in the world as farmers. His wife became noted 
throughout a large community both in North Carolina and later in 
Ohio for her skill as a midwife and doctor. They lived for some years 
in North Carolina, and later moved to Ohio. Their children were born 
chiefly in the former state, but some of the younger in Ohio. 

The nine children of Jesse and Eleanor Holloway are meutioned as 
follows: 1. Margaret, the oldest, was born September 22, 1828, and 
now at a very advanced age, is the widow of William Mills, and lives 
in Neoga, Illinois, with a younger daughter. 2. Abner, born December 
6, 1830, was the father of Joseph A. and is given more space in the 
following paragraph. 3. Amos, born August 29, 1834, is now nearly 
eighty years of age, is a retired farmer in Monroe township of Grant 
county, and has a family of children. 4. Timothy, bom May 24, 1837, 
now deceased, lived and died in Randolph county, Indiana, was twice 
married and had children by both wives. 5. Isaac, born June 29, 1840, 
uow lives in Neoga, Illinois, where he is a retired merchant and retired 
school teacher, and had two children by his first wife. 6. Elizabeth, 
born June 24, 1842, married Josiah Ferguson, and lives in Marion with 
her family. 7. Jesse C, born December 12, 1844, died September 16, 
1864, having starved to death in the Libby Prison at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, while a prisoner of war. He went out to the front as a member 
of Company C of the Ninetieth Indiana Regiment of Cavalry. 
8. Eleauora, born February 20, 1847, first married James Fleming, and 
next Elijah Stafford, and for her third husband took Martin Fisher, a 
Civil war veteran, and they now live in Montana, having one daughter 
by the third marriage. 9. Sarah, born September 29, 1849, is deceased 
and was the wife of F. A. Fleming, a farmer living in Monroe township 
in Grant county and having children. 

Abner Holloway was born in Clinton county, Ohio, at the date 
already given. His parents had moved to Ohio in the early days from 
North Carolina, and when he was a child they moved on and settled in 
Grant county in Fairmount township. There in the Friends church, 
and with the Quaker ceremony, on May 15, 1854, Abner Holloway mar- 
ried Sarah Rich, who was born in Hamilton county, Ohio, October 7, 
1837, and was a child when her parents came to Grant county. 

Concerning the Rich family more particular history will be found 
under the name of Mr. Eri Rich. After his marriage Abner Holloway 
and wife began life on a farm in Monroe township. In 1882 they moved 
to Fairmount township, buying land in section twenty-seven. He pros- 
pered as a farmer, and eventually owned two hundred and fifty-four 
and a half acres of land, besides having invested interests in Faii-mount. 
His death occurred April 1, 1903. He was a life-long member of the 
Friends church, and in politics a Republican, always esteemed for his 
upright character, and public spirited citizenship. His widow is still 
living, having her home with their children. 

There were ten children bom to Abner Holloway and wife, and brief 
mention of them is made as follows : Margaret A. and Sarah, are both 
deceased, and both were married and left children. The living children 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 527 

are: 1. jMiriam, is the wife of Sylvester MeCormick, living in section 
twenty-seven of Fairmount township, and having children. 2. Marion 
married Emma Riflle, lives on a farm in Huntington county, and has 
three sons. 3. Mai-y E. is the wife of William Nelson, living in New 
ilexico, and the parents of four sons and two daughters. 4. Matilda J. 
is the wife of Elsey Mills, whose home is in New Mexico, and the}' are 
the parents of three sons and two daughters. 5. Margaret, now 
deceased, was the wife of William Ozenbaugh, who lives at Swayzee, 
and has two living sons. 6. The next in line is Joseph A. HoUoway, 
whose career is described in the following paragraphs. 7. Sarah E., 
now deceased, was the wife of Burton Leas, and he lives in Upland and 
has three daughters. 8. Jesse C. married Lillie Corn, lives on a farm 
in Faii-mount township, and has five children. 9. Eri is a farmer of 
Fairmount township, married Clara Jones, and has one son and three 
daughters. 10. Arthur A. is a farmer in section twenty-seven of Fair- 
mount township, and by his marriage to Ella Fleming has three sons 
and two daughters. 

jMr. Joseph A. Holloway was born in Monroe township of Grant 
county, March 20, 1870. His early education was begun in the public 
schools and completed in the Fairmount Academy. Choosing farming 
as his vocation, he bought some property in Fairmount City and divided 
his time between farm work and teaching for several years. His home 
was in Fairmount from 1896 until 1899, and at the latter date he 
moved to Monroe township. In 1904 he came to his father's old farm 
in Fairmount township on section twenty-seven and there he is owner 
of one hundred and two acres, making a valuable and most productive 
farm estate. Its improvements classify it among the model places of 
Grant couJity. A tine basement barn, with ample capacity for grain and 
stock, is a prominent feature of the homestead, while a nicely painted 
white house affords the comforts of home to himself and family. As a 
farmer Mr. Holloway believes in sending all his products to market on 
the foot, and therefore feeds his corn, oats, wheat and hay to his hogs 
and fine short-horn cattle. 

Politically he has for many years been an active Republican and has 
served as precinct committeeman and in other party posts. He is now 
and has been since 1910, secretary of the Fairmount to^vnship advisory 
board. Mr. Holloway was married in Monroe to\vnship to Miss Lorana 
Nelson, who was born there November 1, 1875. She was educated in 
her native locality, and was well trained and possesses the chai'acter 
fitting her for her duties as housewife and mother. Her parents were 
Nelson H. and Mathilda (Thorp) Nelson. Her father was born in 
Grant county, and her mother in Ohio. For many years their home 
has been in Monroe township, where they are thrifty farmers and 
active members of the Christian church. There were six children in the 
Nelson family, two of whom are married. Mr. and Mrs. Holloway have 
the following children: Nelson A., born December 7, 1896, and now 
attending school ; Clarence C, born March 2, 1898 ; Ancil D., who was 
born Jlay 8, 1903 ; and Ernest W., bom November 29, 1909. Mr. and 
Mrs. Holloway are members of the Friends church, in which Mr. Holloway 
was reared. 

Charles E. D.ivis. In the November election of 1912 the citizens of 
Grant county made a very happy choice for the ofiSce of county recorder. 
Charles E. Davis came to Marion only a few years ago to take a position 
in one of the local manufacturing enterprises, and by his ability as a 
business man, and the ready esteem and popularity which he quickly 
acquired among all classes of citizenship, has for several years been 



528 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

recognized as a citizen who deserves promotion, and is thoroughly- 
worthy of the confidence of the voters. 

Charles B. Davis was born December 6, 1873, at Oswego, New York. 
His parents were Richard S. and Lydia (Court) Davis, the former a 
native of England, and the latter of New York State. For half a cen- 
tury the father sailed the high seas, and visited every port on the globe. 
In 1888 he came to the middle west, locating in Allegan county, Michi- 
gan, which remained his home until his death in 1898, when he was 
seventy-four years old. The mother is still living there. Of their three 
children, two are living, and the brother of the Marion citizen is James 
P. Davis of Allegan county. The father was a man of unusual educa- 
tion, and took a very prominent part in Masonic circles. 

Charles E. Davis has a career in which individual initiative and 
self effort have been prominent factors. Born in New York, educated 
there and in Allegan county in the common schools, he left Allegan 
county at the age of fourteen, and went to seek his fortunes first in 
Grand Rapids, Michigan. He got a job as ash-wheeler in a large power- 
house, and his willingness to work and readiness to learn were appre- 
ciated by several promotions until he was assistant engineer. From 
there he went to Chicago, and while working there came to a keen 
realization of the advantages of a good technical training as a prepara- 
tion for life. Consequently he gave up his leisure and social pleasures, 
entered Armour Institute of Technology and paid his way while study- 
ing the course in electrical engineering until his gi-aduation in 1902. 
He followed his work as an electrical engineer in Chicago until 1907, 
when he came to Marion to become engineer for the Marion Handle & 
Manufacturing Company, a position which he has since held. 

On November 8, 1894, Mr. Davis married Alice Ortman of Allegan 
county, Michigan, a daughter of J. H. Ortman. Their four children 
are Mahlon 0., Lucy E., Barbara, and Charles E., Jr., all of whom are 
at home. Mr. Davis was elected on November 5, 1913, recorder of 
Grant county on the Democratic ticket, and took office on the first of 
January, 1914. Fraternally he belongs to the Order of Eagles, the 
Loyal Order of Moose, and the Crew of Neptune. 

L. G. Richards. Grant county owes much to the Richards family, 
both for the part it has performed in the development of the country 
from the wilderness in the early days, and also for its substantial cit- 
izenship and high moral influence. Mr. L. G. Richards is now nearly 
eighty years of age, has spent all his life in Grant county, is a product 
of its pioneer schools when all instruction was given in log buildings, 
and the curriculum was the three R's, and by a long and active career 
of industry and exceptional business management accumulated an es- 
tate which at one time was among the largest in Jefferson township. 

His grandfather Henry Richards was born either in Virginia or 
Pennsylvania, was an early settler in the state of Ohio, where it is 
thought he was married. The maiden name of his wife was Miss Thom, 
and during their residence on a farm in Guernsey county, Ohio, their 
children were born. These children were : John. Daniel, Susan, Cath- 
erine, Jacob. Daniel, who married a ]\Iiss Lewis, was a farmer, went 
out to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, in an early day and lived and died there, 
leaving a family. Susan married John Ogan, a farmer, and a number 
of years later moved out to Kansas, where they died. Catherine married 
Nathan Lewis, a schoolteacher, and soon after their marriage went to 
Kansas, where their lives were spent on a farm. Jacob married Susan 
Gillispie, and they lived and died in Jeffei-son township of Grant county, 
where they were substantial farmere. and of their children some are 
still living. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 529 

Rev. John Richards, father of L. G. Richards, was born in Guernsey 
county, Ohio, in 1810 or 1811. His youth was spent on a farm in his 
native county, and while there he married Effie Roberts, who was born 
in Ohio about 1812-13. After the birth of their first son and child, 
Henry, in 1829 or 1830, they came with other menibei's of the family, 
including their parents, to Grant county, locating in the wildwoods. All 
of the family obtained land in Grant county, grandfather Henry Rich- 
ards getting two hundred acres, and subsequently accumulating eighty 
acres more, so that his place consisted of two hundred and eighty acres 
before his death. All of the sons likewise, took up land, and became 
pioneer workers in the early decades of Grant county 's histoay. Grand- 
father Henry Richards died when about sevent.y years of age, some 
years before the Civil war, possibly as early as 1850. His wife died 
even earlier. 

Rev. John Richards, after moving to Grant county, acquired and 
improved two hundred acres of land. While a prosperous farmer, and 
thus providing for the material needs of himself and children, he was 
likewise one of the prominent leaders in the Primitive Baptist church. 
Largely owing to his efforts, the church known as Harmony was organ- 
ized at Matthews. Later he was ordained a preacher, and with saddle- 
bags and on horseback pursued his work as an itinerant preacher, 
throughout this section of the state traveling hundreds of miles, and 
preaching in as many as a hundred different localities. He was one of 
the pioneer preachers who visited from cabin to cabin with self-denying 
earnestness, traveling through the unbroken forests, exhorting, counsel- 
ing, reproving, as occasion demanded, and was always welcome at the 
pioneer homes. His was the work of a real evangelist, and many classes 
were organized by him in this part of the state. His home in Grant 
county was the headquarters for a large following of primitive Baptists, 
and as many as one hundred and twenty-five people were entertained at 
the Richards place during the three days' meetings, some of them com- 
ing from long distances, even as much as a hundred miles, riding on 
horseback, and in every other pioneer conveyance. His woi-k as a 
preacher went on, and was concluded only with his death. He was a 
Democrat in politics, and exerted much influence in civic affairs, as well 
as in religion. He had lived to see what he believed was the end of the 
Civil war, passing away early in the sixties. His wife died in middle life 
about 1850, and she was likewise an active worker in the Primitive 
Baptist church. 

Rev. John Richards and wife had six sons and one daughter, men- 
tioned as follows : 1. Rev. Henry, Jr., a minister of the Primitive Bap- 
tist church, organized a class in Coffey county, and later did work, in 
Oklahoma, where he now lives at the venerable age of eighty-four and 
still active in his faith. 2. L. G. Richards is the second of the family. 
3. Abraham, now living retired in Jefferson township, is seventy-seven 
years of age, and has a family of his own. 4. Daniel who died in 1907, 
was twice married, and left two sons and one daughter, who are still 
living. 5. Jacob, who is in active superintendence of his farm in Jeffer- 
son township, was twice married, and four children by his first wife are 
living. 6. ]Martha, who lives with her third husband in Albany. Indiana, 
has children by her first husband. 7. Isaac, occupies a farm in Jeffer- 
son township and has two daughters and one son, the latter being Lewis, 
who is an editor in the state of California. 

Mr. L. G. Richards was born in Jefferson township of Grant county, 
October 25, 1834. The school which he attended as a boy was in many 
ways typical of the pioneer temples of learning. It was built of logs, 
had a puncheon floor, the benches were slabs supported by rough legs, 



530 BLACKFOKD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

and on either side of the structure a log was left out to admit the light, 
which came dimly into the room through greased paper. The writing 
desk was a broad l)oard supported on a slant by pins driven into the 
walls. During his early work at home he earned enough to buy eighty 
acres of land, and from that start, by industry, economy, and energy, 
increased his holdings until at one time he was the possessor of nine 
hundred and sixty acres of as fine land as was to be found in Jefferson 
township. A part of the land lay in Delaware county. To each of his 
children he has given a farm, and every one is improved with excellent 
buildings. Mr. Richards still keeps one hundred and ninety-two acres 
for the home place, on section three, and the improvements there are 
of the best class. For many years he has grown on a large scale, the 
regular crops of this country, and has fed his product to hogs and cattle. 
Though his prosperity has been exceptional, his dealings with his com- 
munity have always been of the strictest honor and probity, and as an 
illustration of this fact it can be said that he was never engaged in a 
law suit, either as defendant or plaintiff, in all his life. 

In the accumulation of his generous proiDerty he had a noble and 
thrifty woman as his helpmate. Her maiden name was Mary E. Craw, 
and she was born in Jefferson township, December 11, 1834, dying 
May 27, 1900. She was the mother of three daughters and two sons, 
namely: 1. Rev. J. William, a farmer, has charge as pastor of the 
Harmony Primitive Baptist church. He married Emma Harris, and has 
two sons and one daughter. 2. David L., who now owns and occupies 
a part of the home farm, is an official in the Matthews State Bank; he 
married Lois Fergus, and they have two daughters. 3. Lucina, by her 
marriage to Harmon Newburger, has one son. She is now the wife of 
Rufus Nottingham, and they have one son and three daughters. 4. 
Mollie died after her marriage to Frank H. Kirkwood, whose sketch 
will be found elsewhere in these pages. 5. Rena is the wife of John 
W. Himelick, a well known Grant county citizen, sketched elsewhere. 

Mr. Richards for his second wife married Miss Maria Martin, who 
was born in Fayette county, Indiana, February 18, 1837, and from four- 
teen years of age was reared in Delaware county, living in the city of 
Muncie. Her parents were Russell P. and Ida A. Martin. Her father 
was born in Ohio, October 26, 1807, and died March 22, 1874, while her 
mother was born in New Jersey, September 27, 1807, and died November 
7, 1902. Both died in Delaware county. They were married in Ohio, 
and soon afterwards came to Fayette county, Indiana, where her father 
followed his regular trade of brick mason and plasterer. They belonged 
to the Primitive Baptist church. Mrs. Richards had three brothers, 
Wilson, Robert, and Maxwell, who were soldiers in the Civil war. Two 
of them were in a southern prison for some months and one died after 
leaving the battlefield stricken with illness. Mr. Richards is a leader in 
the Primitive Baptist church, and has long been one of its officials. In 
polities he is a Democrat. 

Rev. Nixon Rush. The career of a just and good man, and the 
memory of his kindly, noble deeds, are in themselves his true biography. 
In the life of such an individual the observer of human character may 
find both precept and example. He may discover in such a life sermons 
that speak more eloquently and leave a more lasting impression upon 
the heart than any human words. Where eminent abilities and unblem- 
ished integrity, combined with unimpeachable virtue, derivable from 
the daily practice of religion and piety, contribute to adorn the character 
of an individual, then it is most proper to be prominently set forth as an 
example to those who would make themselves useful to the rest of man- 




NIXON liUSH 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 531 

kind. And the writer cherishes the belief that he will perform this 
acceptable service in giving a brief sketch of the life and work of Rev. 
Nixon Rush, who for half a century was known to the citizens of Grant 
county as an industrious and successful agriculturist, but who, perhaps, 
was better known as a minister of the Quaker faith, as a member of which 
he had preached throughout this part of Indiana for more than forty 
years. 

Rev. Nixon Rush traces his ancestry back to Colonial days, when it 
was founded in this country by five brothers, early settlers of Culpeper 
county, Virginia, possibly about the year 1700. The early generations 
resided in that locality, but the first definite data to be found is that 
concerning one Crawford, or Clifford Rush, who was born in that county 
about the year 1720. He became a large plantation owner, had many 
slaves and spent his entire life in his native county as did his wife Mary. 
Among their children was Benjamin Rush, who was born in Culpeper 
county, Virginia, April 19, 1752. When about of age he migrated to 
Randolph county, North Carolina, and there was married in 1772 to 
Dorcas Vickery, a native of the Old North State. They settled down as 
farming people and accumulated and improved a large property not far 
from Shepherd Mountain. There they spent their entire lives, dying in 
the faith of the Methodist church. It may have been that they were 
slave-holders. Their six sons and two daughters all grew to maturity 
and lived to advanced years, being large, portly people, and all had 
homes of their own and reared large families. The sons were all slave- 
holders, and were prominent in polities, being for the greater part Demo- 
crats. The members of this family were noted for their hospitality. 

Of the above eight children, Azel Rush, the grandfather of Rev. 
Nixon Rush, was born August 8, 1780. He grew up a farmer, and in 
1806 was married to Elizabeth Beckerdite, who was born in Randolph 
county, and she died in 1818. Mr. Rush had joined the Friends Church, 
the only one of the family to do so, and later his wife joined and died 
in that faith. He was married a second time to a Miss White, a member 
of an old North Carolina family of Randolph county, and she died there 
prior to 1836. She left a family, but her descendants all reside in North 
Carolina. Mr. Rush was married a third time, and in 1846 came to Faii'- 
mount township. Grant county, settling on undeveloped land, which they 
reclaimed from the wilderness, and here spent the balance of their lives. 
They were life-long Quakers and remained true to the teachings of that 
faith. They had a family of four children: Dorinda, Iredell, Dorcas 
and Nancy, all of whom married and all spent their entire lives in Grant 
county. 

Iredell Rush, the father of Rev. Nixon Rush, was born in Randolph 
county. North Carolina, January 14, 1807, as a birthright Quaker. He 
was married in his native county to Miss Elizabeth Bogue, who was born 
February 7, 1808, in southern North Carolina, the ceremony taking place 
in 1829, and being performed after the custom of the Friends Church. 
They commenced in a humble manner, securing a horse and small wagon, 
and two weeks after their mamage bid a final farewell to a large circle 
of friends and. with ilr. Rush's uncle, ]\Iathew Wiuslow. set out north 
far over the mountains for the wilderness of Indiana. After a long and 
tedious journey, replete with dangers and exciting experiences, the young 
couple reached the Friends' settlements at Derby, Wayne county, there 
renting a small farm. The neighbors, in the kindly, encouraging way 
that always marked those of this faith in the early days and has con- 
tinued to do so to the present time, assisted them to start house, giving 
them various articles needed, as well as chickens and young pigs to raise 
for their own. Amid these pioneer suiToundings they remained until 



532 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

March, 1831, when they pushed ou to Grant county, Mr. Rush securing 
forty acres of government land, the deed for which was signed by Andrew 
Jackson. Here he cut a space 18x20 feet, in the timber, on which was 
erected a rude log cabin, with the under boards held down by poles, the 
floor made of slabs, and the stick and mortar chimney serving all pur- 
poses. It was some time before the quilt used as a door covering was 
replaced by a wooden door, and not one nail was used in the entire con- 
struction of this pioneer home. 

This was the lirst home to be erected between this section and Alex- 
andria, Madison county. Game was plentiful and kept the family table 
weU suppUed; the tasks that otherwise would have seemed onerous and 
distasteful were made light in the atmosphere of love that hovered over 
the little home ; and although riches and plenty came in later years, Mr. 
and !Mrs. Rush both stated in later life that the first ten years of their 
married life had been their happiest ones. Industry and economy, thrift 
and perseverance, soon placed Mr. and Mrs. Rush in a position where 
they could aiford a finer home. When this had been erected, they added 
to their acres, their stock and their equipment, and finally became known 
as one of the substantial families of this section of the county, owning 
160 acres here and 400 acres in another part of the State. Sir. Rush 
passed awa.y May 29, 1853, while his wife survived him until April 12, 
1877, both dying in the faith of the Quaker church in which they had 
been lifelong members and active workers. They assisted in building the 
first Quaker church in this community, although meetings had been held 
as early as 1831 in private houses, chiefly that of Joseph Winslow. In 
politics Mr. Rush was first a Whig and then became an Abolitionist and 
a Republican. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Rush were as follows : 
John, born at Derby, "Wayne county, Indiana, November 30, 1830, died, 
aged fifty years; married Katura Jay, also deceased; Calvin, born in 
Grant count}', Indiana, July 14, 1833, died about 1904, married and had 
no issue ; Nixon, of this review, born March 30, 1836 ; Millicent, born 
November 10, 1838, widow of Elwood Haisley, now living with her chil- 
dren in Fairmount ; Jane, Anna and Thomas, all of whom died when 
about twenty years of age ; and ilary, born January- 24, 1850, who mar- 
ried Robert Carter, and now lives at Riverside, Kansas, and has a family. 

Nixon Rush grew up ou his father's farm, located just outside of 
Fairmount, in Grant county, and here he has spent the gi'eater part of his 
life, being the proprietor of most of the property at this time and living 
in the house which had almost been completed by his father at the time 
of the latter 's death. He has an excellent property of 140 acres, in addi- 
tion to which he donated six acres of land to Fairmount Academy, located 
near his home, a Friends' preparatory school. Mr. Rush is an excellent 
business man and skilled farmer, and has made a decided success of his 
ventures. Although now practically retired from the activities of life, 
he still superintends the working of his land, and cai-ries on his business 
matters in the same able manner that characterized his younger days. 

On October 21, 1861, Mr. Rush was married to Miss Louisa Winslow, 
who was born in Grant county, Indiana, August 5, 1843. daughter of 
Daniel and Rebecca (Hiatt) Winslow. A devoted wife and mother, a 
consistent Friend and an upright Christian woman, the death of Sirs. 
Rush, which occurred May 24, 1911, was sincerely mourned by a -nide 
circle of friends, who loved her for her many excellent qualities of mind 
and heart. To Mr. and Sirs. Rush there were born the following chil- 
dren : Axelina, Elmira, Emma, Walter, Olive, Calvin C, Charles E. Of 
these Axelina died at the age of two yeai-s. Elmira was born July 4, 
1865, received excellent educational advantages, and now is city editor 
of the Fairmount Neivs, of which her husband, Edgar Baldwin, is editor 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 533 

in chief. They have one sou, Mark, who is a government soil analyzer, 
at the present time located iu Iowa. Emma was born July 7, 1867, was 
well educated, aud became the wife of William A. Beasley. They alter- 
nate between living on a farm aud iu the town of Fairmouut, aud are the 
parents of five children — Myron, Zola, Frank, John aud Elizabeth. 
Walter was born April 4, 1870, was educated iu the public schools, aud 
is now the mauager of his father's farming property. He married 
Elizabeth Johnson of Grant county, Indiana, and they have three chil- 
dren — Loretta 0., at home, a graduate of the Academy; Isadore Alice, 
a graduate of the public schools aud now attendiug the academy, and 
Dorothy E., the baby, two years old. Olive Rush was born June -10, 
1873, aud atteuded the Fairmouut Academy and Earlham College. She 
early displayed marked artistic talent, and began her studies along this 
line in Earlham College. Subsequently she spent two years in the Cor- 
coran Art School, connected with the Corcoran Art Gallery, Washington, 
D. C, aud was there awarded second prize iu a class of eighty pupils 
for advaucement. Later she became a student in the Art Student's 
League, New York City, and became a well-kuowu illustrator for writers 
and authors, making first-page frontispieces for such weU-known maga- 
zines as Scribner's, Harper's, the Ladies' Home Journal and the 
Woman's Home Compauion. She conceived and provided studies for 
large cathedrals and churches, principally windows, aud paiuted por- 
traits of well-known people throughout the country. With Ethel Brown, 
she occupied the studio at Wilmington, Delaware, left vacant by the 
death of Howard Pyle, at the request of his widow. Her pictures, 
largely subject pieces, have been exhibited at various art expositions 
and salons, aud at this time she is successfully continuing her work near 
Paris, France. Calviu C. Rush, j\I. D., was born February 16, 1876, 
and after graduating from the local academy aud Earlham College, 
received a scholarship at Haverford. Subsequently he graduated in 
medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, aud now has a large prac- 
tice at Portage, Pennsylvania. He married Annette Johnson, and they 
have one daughter, Sylvia Louise; aud one sou, Norman J. Charles E. 
Rush was born March 23, 1885, was well educated in the academy and 
at Eai'lham College, and then took special coui'ses in library work. He 
is now the overseer of three libraries at St. Joseph, Missouri. He mar- 
ried Lionue Adsit, daughter of Rev. Spencer M. Adsit, and they have 
one child, Alison A., who is now two years of age. 

Reared in the faith of the Friends church. Rev. Rush was ordained 
as a minister in 1869, aud for forty years has traveled all over this 
part of Indiana, where no minister of the faith is more widely kuown 
nor more greatl.y beloved. For years he was assisted by his wife. He 
has preached at hundreds of fuuerals and has married scores of people 
during his ministrj-. His influence, always for good, has been coustautly 
felt in his community, where he has not alone become a conspicuous 
figure in the church, but has also gained a large place iu the good will 
and love of all classes and denominations. 

Joseph H. Peacock. For generations, wherever their home has been 
in America, whether iu the Atlantic colonies aud states or in Indiana, 
the Peacock family have been noted not only for its faithful adherence 
to the orthodox Quaker religion, but also for its exemplification of the 
virtues and thrifty qualities of that class of people. Grant county 
citizenship has been honored with the presence of the Peacock family 
here for a great many years, and one of its most highly esteemed repre- 
sentatives was the late Joseph H. Peacock, of Fairmount township, who 
died May 14, 1874. 



534 BLACKPOED AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Of English ancestry, it is said that three brothers named Peacock 
came to America during the colonial era, and located among the Penn 
colonies in Pennsylvania. Later some of their descendants moved in 
from South Carolina, where their home remained for several generations. 
The first definite members of the family to be mentioned in this article 
were Asa and his wife Dinah Peacock. Asa Peacock was born in the 
Rice belt of North Carolina, was married there and afterwards took his 
family into North Carolina. Then during the decade of the twenties they 
all came to Indiana. That journey was made in true pioneer style, with 
wagons and teams across the long distances of forest trail, and they 
finally located in the Friends settlement at Newport, now Fountain 
City in Wayne county. From there about 1830 they came to Grant 
county, and entered land from the government in Liberty township. 
Thus the Peacock name has been identified with Grant county for eighty- 
three years. Asa Peacock and his first wife lived and died in Grant 
county. He was past eighty years of age at the time of his death. His 
second wife was Dorcas Jones, nee Hale, who survived him and died in 
Kansas. By her first husband she had a familj' of children. Asa Pea- 
cock and his first wife were the parents of William, Levi, Joseph, Betsey 
D., Martha (Patsey) and John. Of these, Levi died recently at Rich- 
mond, Indiana, when past ninety years of age. Joseph is still living, 
over eighty years of age, in Kokomo. Patsey and another sister died 
young. Betsey D. married and reared a family of children. John died 
an old man and left a family of children. AVilliam Peacock, son of Asa 
and Dinah, was born in South Carolina, November 4, 1812. He was 
still a boy when his parents moved to Indiana, and he reached maturity 
in Grant county. In 1833 he went to Newgarden in Wayne, where he 
married Phoebe Haisley, who was born October 9, 1812. They began 
their married life in Grant county, and in a wild and unbroken section 
of Liberty township. They secured land direct from the government 
and improved a good farm. There William Peacock died April 30, 1867, 
and his remains were laid to rest at Oak Ridge. His death resulted from 
a fever contracted during attendance of his wife, who was stricken 
with the disease while on a visit to Newgarden, Wayne county, and died 
March 23, 1867. To William Peacock and wife were born eleven chil- 
dren, mentioned as follows: 1. Hannah, born in 1839, and died in 1913 
in the state of Oregon, married Mordecai M. Davison, also deceased; 
they had no children. 2. Josiah, born in 1836 and died in 1867, married 
Cynthia Rich, and they had five children. 8. Anna, born in 1839 and 
died in 1882, became wife of Barkley Moon and had four children. 
4. Susanna, bom in 1840, and died in 1912, married Lewis Haekett, 
and they died without issue. 5. Levina, born in 1842, and died in 1874, 
married Aaron Comer, and had no children. 6. Joseph H. born Feb- 
ruary 9, 1844, and died May 5, 1874, is the special subject of this article. 
7. Jane, born in 1846 and died in 1868, married Thomas H. Johnson, 
and left one son. 8. Sarah died in infancy. 9. Diana, born in 1852, 
lives in Fairmouut, the widow of Nathan Hinshaw. 10. William, Jr., 
born in 1854, lives in Sedgewick, Kansas, married Lyda Smith, and has 
children. 11. Levi died in infancy. 

The late Joseph H. Peacock was reared on his father's farm in Lib- 
erty township, was educated, and trained in the local schools and in a 
good home where prevailed a high atmosphere of moral and religious 
influence. In 1869 in the Quaker church at Fairmount and with the 
orthodox Quaker ceremony, he married Elizabeth Radley, who was born 
near Chelmsford, Essex county, England, June 6, 1843. 

Mrs. Peacock, who now lives in Fairmount with her children, comes 
of an old English ancestry. Her parents were Samuel and Mary (BuU) 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 535 

Radley, her mother a sister of John Bull, one of the early settlers of 
Fairmount. Samuel Radley and wife were married in Essex county, 
England, and all their four children, Mary A., Elizabeth, Alice C, and 
Samuel John were born in England. The father was by trade a plas- 
terer and brick layer. While the children were all small the family 
embarked on a sailing vessel named Westminster, under Captain Doan, 
and voyaged from Loudon to New York, six weeks being spent on the 
ocean. Locating near Fairmount, Mr. Radley followed his trade and 
engaged in farming, his later years being mostly spent on the farm. 
He died March 11, 1877, when about sixty years of age. His wife passed 
away October 24, 1888. She was born in the Presbyterian faith, but 
early in life joined the Friends church, and her father was a birthright 
Friend. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Peacock were the parents of two sous. 
William A., born November 23, 1871, and died at the age of eighteen; 
John Henry, born June 14, 1873, received a substantial education in the 
Fairmount Public Schools, and graduated from the biblical department 
of the Fairmount Academy and also the Wesleyan Theological Semi- 
nary. He with his mother now owns 230 acres of land and is a thrifty 
and successful farmer and devoted Christian. He married Ruth Reese, 
of Michigan. Their two sons are Myron R., at home, and a graduate of 
the Fairmount Academy: and Joseph Edward, who died when nearly 
seven j'ears of age. The farm upon which Joseph H. Peacock died lies 
northwest of Fairmount, near where Fairmount Academy now stands, 
lies just uortheast of Fairmount. There are over two hundred acres of 
land, and a comfortable farm house, the well painted barns, the improve- 
ments in fences and cultivation, all indicate the thrift and prosperity 
which have been associated with the Peacock name throughout its con- 
nection with Grant county. 

Richard H. Dillon. Through all his career Mr. Dillon has quietly 
followed the vocation of farmer. Since he left school each recurring 
spring has meant to him a time of opportunity, the planting for the 
later harvest. Many of his hopes have had fruition, as well as his crops. 
He has been prospered, has performed his share of the responsibilities 
that come to every man and the extent of his riches is not to be meas- 
ured alone by his material store. 

Concerning the family of Mr. Dillon it may be said that his grand- 
father was also Richard H. Dillon, and was probably born in one of 
the southern states, of Irish ancestry. His death occurred in Ohio. He 
married Elizabeth Unthank. They lived in Clinton county, Ohio, for 
some years, and in 1848 moved to Madison county, Indiana, where they 
were among the early Quaker settlers. Of their children, the youngest 
son, Oliver, lived to be 60 or 65 years of age and died near Indianapolis, 
and, Allen became the father of Richard H. Dillon. 

Allen Dillon was born in Clinton county, Ohio, March 13, 1836, and 
was twelve yeai-s of age when the family moved to Madison county, 
Indiana. There he grew to manhood, and for a number of years con- 
ducted a saw mill, did carpenter work, lived on a farm which he owned. 
In 1856 he moved to Grant county, and lived in this county until his 
death on January 3, 1899, passing away in Fairmount. In 1857 Allen 
Dillon married in Fairmount township Kaziah Henly, who was born in 
North Carolina in 1832, and came north from Randolph county, North 
Carolina, to Grant county with her parents in 1837, and continued to 
reside in Grant county either in Fairmount township or the city until 
her death in 1911. Her parents were staunch Quakers whose ancestors 
caine to America with William Penn, and Allen Dillon was also of that 
faith. She was the mother of two children, one of whom died in infancy. 



536 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Richard H. Dillon was born on the old home farm in Fairmount 
township, August 14, 1858, received his education in the public schools 
and Purdue University, and has always followed the vocation of farm- 
ing. He built his present good brick home at 919 North Buckeye Street 
in Fairmount in 1891. He and his wife own seventeen acres of laud in 
an adjacent section, also another tract of 40 acres in Fairmount town- 
ship and valuable farm lauds in IMarshall count}-, Indiana. 

Mr. Dillon was married in Grant county to Alice R. Coahran, who 
was born April 4, 1861. When she was six years of age, she moved to 
Madison county, Indiana, with her parents, who were John and Susan 
(Hammond) Coahran. Her parents lived on a farm in Madison county 
until 1879, when they moved to Fairmount City, and here they both 
died, the father at the age of eighty-four and the mother at the age of 
seventy-two. They were also of Quaker religion. Mr. and Mrs. Dillon 
are the parents of one child, Mary Allen, born July 14, 1892. She 
received her early educational advantages in the Fairmount public 
schools and the Academy, and is a member of the class of 1914 at Earl- 
ham College at Richmond. In politics Mr. Dillon is a Republican voter. 

John Smith. For many years one of the most prosperous fai'ming 
men in the county, John Smith, with the organization of the Upland 
State Bank, stepped into the office of president of that young financial 
institution, and he has since continued in his dual capacity of farmer 
Some time after her husband's death Mrs. Peacock sold that farm and 
later purchased the farm upon which the Peacocks now live. This farm 
and banker, with equal success in both enterprises. As a well-to-do 
agricultural man, he is widely known in the county, and his land hold- 
ings aggregate something like 525 acres, designated much as follows: 
The home farm of 210 acres located in section 25 and section 26 ; forty 
acres adjoining the home place on the north ; forty acres in section 24 ; 
and one hundred acres in section 36, making about four hundred acres 
in Monroe township. He also owns one hundred and twenty acres in 
Blackford county. The bulk of the land he rents for a yearly cash 
rental, but the home place of two hundred and ten acres he operates 
himself. He is also a veteran of the Civil war, having enlisted February 
1, 1865, in Company B, 153d Indiana Voliinteer Infantry, and served 
until September 4, 1865, when he was discharged at Louisville, Ken- 
tucky. Did detached duty during the most of his service. 

John Smith was born in the northeast part of Mahoning county, Ohio, 
on November 15, 1843, and is a son of Thomas and Mary (Leonard) 
Smith, who reared a family of seven children, as follows: Wesley, of 
Huntingdon county ; John, of this review ; Jane, who is deceased ; Emily 
and Laviua, also deceased ; Mrs. Maria Smith, a resident of Milford Cen- 
ter, Ohio; and Hiram, of Hartford City. The father of this family, 
Thomas Smith, moved to Grant coiinty in the spring of 1845 and here 
entered a tract of government land, consisting of one hundred and sixty 
acres, and the home of John Smith is built upon one forty of this original 
acreage. The land was a dense wood at that time, and before he was 
able to build the rude log cabin that sheltered his little familj^ in those 
early days, he was obliged to cut a road from the nearest settlement 
through his place. He gradually cleared up the place, and in later years 
came to be the owner of one hundred and twenty acres in Blackford 
county, together with another forty adjoining, but he was swindled out 
of this land through his investment in a railroad line that was projected 
through those parts. Thomas Smith died July 23, 1876, and his wife 
passed away January 7, 1901. 

Mr. John Smith's progress has been fairly rapid, and at all times 




MM 




MR. AND :\IRS. JOHN S:\IITH 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 537 

certain. No element of chance has entered into his operations, and when 
he bought a new piece of land, he did so secure in the knowledge that he 
was getting it at a fair price, and that the top of the market had not 
yet been reached. When he married in 1873 he was the owner of a 100- 
aere tract. He soon bought another forty from his father and engaged 
in potato growing, sometimes having as high as forty acres planted to 
that indispensable tuber. He has raised as high as four hundred bushels 
to the acre, but would average about three hundred bushels, which at 
a market of twenty-five to thirty cents, made money for him evei*y year. 
He was dubbed the "Potato King" of his locality, and was well entitled 
to the name. For twent.y-five years he devoted himself to the cultivation 
of this crop, his shipments running well into the carloads each season. 
He continued to buy land until he had a large acreage to his credit, and 
as has alreadj- been stated, much of the land he rents, confining himself 
to the cultivation of the home place alone. An example of his thrift in 
the matter of buying land may be cited in the instance of his purchase, 
with his brother, of a forty lying on a creek. The price paid was $100 
and the consideration was offered in a colt and $50 in cash. This forty, 
then considered worth little or nothing, is today well drained and worth 
$100 an acre. Mr. Smith has paid high prices for some of his land, 
however, much of it coming at $25 and $30, while some of it cost him 
as high as $50 an acre. 

31r. Smith's home farm is one of the finest in the county, and is 
likewise one of the best improved and kept up. In 1889 a fine eleven-room 
house was built on the place, modern in many ways, and decidedly orna- 
mental to the landscape. A beautiful sloping lawn adds to the natural 
beauty of the place, and numerous barns and other buildings contribute 
to the general attractiveness of the ensemble. 

On Februaiy 12, 187-1, Sir. Smith was married to Lucy Bocock, the 
daughter of James and Hester Ann (Shannon) Bocock, of Clark county, 
Ohio, and Brown county, Ohio, respectively. They were married in 
Indiana and lived many years in Grant and Blackford counties, this 
state. They have reared a family of eight children: Raleigh, former 
principal of the Jonesboro schools, is now assistant cashier of the Upland 
State Bank ; Pluma is at home ; Arthur is a furniture dealer in Hart- 
ford City; Thana is deceased; Ira, also deceased; Harry A. is a practic- 
ing dentist in Seattle, "Washington ; Charles is a farmer in ]\Ionroe town- 
ship; Lelah is at the Lewis Institute, Chicago, 111., studying domestic 
science. 

Concerning Raleigh 0. Smith, who is assistant cashier of the Upland 
State Bank, it may be stated that he was born on November 22, 1874, 
in Monroe township, and received his education in the district schools 
in Fairmount Academj' and ilarion Normal College, finishing his train- 
ing in the State Normal College at Terra Haute, Indiana, in 1906. He 
, began teaching at the age of nineteen in 1894, and taught seven terms in 
Marion at different times; two terms were taught in Franklin township, 
and he served as teacher of the Mississinewa schools, finishing his peda- 
gogic service with three years as principal of the Jonesboro High School. 
In May, 1912, he became assistant cashier of the bank, of which his 
father is president, and which was organized in 1909. 

John Smith is a Republican and is a member of the Friends church, 
his son Raleigh sharing in his politics and his religion. The parents of 
Mr. Smith were Methodists, but he embraced the faith of the Friends 
some years ago, and has ordered his life largely in accordance with the 
demands of that sect. He is especially enthusiastic on the subject of 
temperance, and is one of the stanch and true citizens of the community ,. 
where he has done his full share in the good work of development and 
upbuilding. 



538 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Samuel Charles "Wilson. A resident in Grant county since pioneer 
times, large family relationship, with a high character of moral and 
industrious citizenship, strict and active membership in the Friends 
church, — such are some of the significant attributes attaching to the 
Wilson family in Grant county. There are a number of Wilson families 
included within the general scope of the name, but this particular article 
is concerned with the immediate ancestors and the individual career of 
Samuel C. Wilson, who is now living retired at his beautiful country 
home in Fairmount township on section sixteen, and is almost eligible 
to the Grant county octogenarian club. 

If the history of the faDiily were written in detail, it would be found 
that the first members came over to America with William Penn and 
assisted that great Quaker in founding and developing the city of Phila- 
delphia. Through all the generations, with hardly an exception, the 
different membei's of the families have been orthodox Quakers. Some 
years after the family was founded, one of its members moved into 
North Carolina, that being before the Revolutionary war. He located 
in Randolph county, a county which probably sent more settlers to 
Grant county, Indiana, than any other eastern locality. There he be- 
came one of the organizers and early builders of the Back Creek Quaker 
meeting. It is not known exactly how many years elapsed between this 
first settlement and the birth of Joseph Wilson, grandfather of the 
Samuel C. Wilson of this sketch. Grandfather Joseph Wilson was born 
in Randolph county, North Carolina, about 1760. His occupation was 
farming. He was a faithful atendant at the Quaker meeting, and it is 
related that he would desist his labors in so important an undertaking 
as a barn raising in order to attend church services. His death occurred 
in North Carolina, and it is supposed that he was quite old. He was 
married in his native locality to a Miss Charles, whose familj- had also 
for a long time been residents in North Carolina, and of the same strict 
sect of Friends. At her death she left three sons and two daughters. 
These children, so far as information is obtainable, are mentioned as 
follows: 1. Samuel, born in Randolph countj', was married there to 
Ruth Thornburg, and came north to Indiana about 1836 or 1837, 
settling and developing a fine homestead and all that goes with it in 
Hamilton county, Indiana. His wife Ruth died in Hamilton county, at 
a good old age, and he then went out to Kansas, where he died shortly 
afterwards at the home of a son. 2. Henry was born on a North Caro- 
lina farm, was married there, and soon afterwards moved to Washington 
county, Indiana, where he improved a good farm and established his 
home and family on a substantial basis. His wife died in Indiana, at a 
comparatively early age, and for his second marriage he was united 
with a Mrs. Alberson. He had children by his first marriage, as did 
his second wife, though there was no issue by their second union. 

3. Abigail was married in Randolph county, North Carolina, to a Mr. 
Simons, came to Henry county, Indiana, where both died, after careers 
of substantial and honorable prosperity. They left a family of children. 

4. This was a daughter who married Owen Lindsley, and they moved 
to Orange county, Indiana, where Mr. Lindsley was a prominent and 
wealthy man and farmer. It is a curious circumstance that all these 
children on coming north to Indiana located in different counties, and 
all of them in staunch communities of Friends. 

The name omitted from the above list of children was John Wilson, 
the oldest of the five. He was born in the Back Creek ]\Ieetings in Ran- 
dolph county. North Carolina, in 1784. He grew up there on his 
father's farm, and was married in early manhood to Mary Winslow. 
She was born in the same section of Indiana, about thirteen yeai-s after 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 539 

her husband. Her father, Henry Wiuslow, later moved to Grant 
county with his family, that mig:i'ation taking place late in the decade of 
the twenties, so that the family was among the eai-liest in this county. 
The Winslows bought government laud and made a fine farm in Fair- 
mount township, where Mr. Winslow died at a good old age. The 
Wiuslow family were prominent members of the Quaker church. John 
Wilson and his wife after their marriage and after the birth of all their 
children in Randolph county, set out from their native state in April, 
1837, to find a home in the fine old country of Indiana. Their journey 
was accomplished somewhat in state, and it is evident that the circum- 
stances of the Wilsons from a material point of view were more pros- 
perous than those of a great many who settled in Grant county at that 
early date. A large wagon drawn by four horses carried many of the 
household possessions and the male members of the family. Behind 
came a carriage, with the wife and younger children. They journeyed 
on day after day along the roads, camping out at night and on Sun- 
days, and were several weeks in performing this interesting trip. On 
reaching Grant county, John Wilson and family located on Section six 
of Fairmount township. The laud had never been broken with the 
plow, and there were few evidences of the work and industry of civilized 
mau anywhere on the three hundred and sixty acres. With the aid of 
the sons, this land rapidly was cleared and brought under cultivation, 
and all members of the household lived happily there until 1856, when 
John Wilson and wife moved into the town of Fairmount, where his 
death occurred in June, 1864, lacking only a day of being eighty years 
of age. His wife afterwards made her home with a son, Milton, in 
Center township, and died there about 1870 at the age of seventy-two. 
Both were among the early members of the Back Creek Friends Church 
in Fairmount township, though they were not among the organizers of 
that community, and took a very prominent part in its affairs. 

The children of John Wilson and wife are noted as follows : 1. Jesse 
E., who died in Fairmount township in 1883 at the age of sixty-seven 
years, was a farmer, a member of the Back Creek Church, and a charter 
member of the Fairmount Meeting, married and had a large family of 
children. 2. Nathan, who died in Fairmount in 1880 at the age of 
sixty-two, was an early member of the Fairmount Quaker Meeting, and 
had a family of twelve children. 3. Cyrus died in middle life at the 
age of forty-five in November, 1864. His home was in Liberty town- 
ship. He married and his three children ai'e all now deceased. 4. Henry, 
who died at the age of forty-four in June, 1863, lived in Fairmount 
township, and had four children. 5. Nancy, who died in April, 1913, 
at the very advanced age of eighty-nine years, married Elam Doherty, 
who died a number of years ago. They left three sons and one daugh- 
ter. 6. Micajah, who died on his farm in Fairmount township, July 1, 
1906, at the age of eighty-one married a Miss Neal, also deceased, and 
there were no children. 7. Elizabeth, better known as Betsy, married 
William Cox, and a full history of the Cox family will be found under 
the name of Nathan D. Cox elsewhere in this work. 8. Eliza, who died in 
1856, in middle life, was the wife of Eli Neal, who is deceased, and two 
of their sous are living. 9. John Milton, who was a farmer all his life, 
spent his last days in Wabash, where he died in 1895, leaving a family 
of four sons still living. 10. Lindsay, who died May 20, 1906, at the 
age of sevent3'-three years and five months, married a Miss Davis, who 
left live children living. 11. The eleventh in the family is Samuel C. 
Wilson, and now the only survivor. 12. Abigail was an infant when 
the family came to Grant county, and died here at the age of nine years. 
Samuel C. Wilson was born in the Back Creek Meeting of Randolph 



540 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

countj', North Carolina, October 14, 1834. Since he was only two and a 
half years of age when the family accomplished its memorable journey 
to Grant county, he naturally remembers nothing of the incidents of 
that event. On the old farm in Fairmount township, he spent his early 
days, had a fair amount of schooling, and after his marriage operated 
a part of his father's estate. In 1864 he moved to section sixteen in 
Fairmount township, which has now been his home for nearly half a 
centurj'. There he bought one hundred and three acres of partly im- 
proved land, and in 1SS4 built the tine old homestead which since lias 
sheltered him and his children. From the standpoint of building, it is 
all very comfortable, and in the best of repairs, and there is not a foot 
of waste land on the entire farm, a fact which shows his thrifty enter- 
prise in handling the soil. His crops are hay, oats, wheat and corn, also 
considerable potatoes, and steadily throughout the years his prosperity 
has been growing so that he has been able to make liberal provisions for 
himself and his family. 

ilr. Wilson was first married in Liberty township of Grant county 
on April 22, 1857. His marriage was in the Quaker church and accord- 
ing to the attractive Quaker ceremony. His bride was Miss Rachael 
Overman, who was born in Center township of this county in March, 
1842, and who died in October, 1865, without children. On January 10, 
1867, in Rush countj% Indiana, Mr. Wilson mamed Elizabeth Jessup, 
who was born near Carthage in Rush county. October 11, 1842. She 
died at her home in Fairmount township, on the fourth of June, 1913. 
She was a birthright Quaker, and from 1867 until her death, a period 
of forty-five years, was one of the active members of the Back Creek 
Meetings. The children of Mr. Wilson and mfe were: 1. Lindsay, 
born March 9, 1870, was educated in the district schools and at the Fair- 
mount Academy, and has been one of the sturdy farmers of this section 
for a number of years. In 1911 he became a member of the board of 
directors of the Fairmount Academy, and as a staunch Republican is 
also a present member of the County Council. In December, 1894, he 
married in Fairmount township. Miss Essie Griffin Davis, a daughter of 
Attorney Foster Davis, ilr. and Mrs. Lindsay Wilson have two chil- 
dren: Dorinda Elizabeth, born in August, 1895, and who graduated a 
member of a class of forty-four in 1913 and is now at home ; Hubert D., 
born July 31, 1897, a senior in the Fairmount Academy. 2. Jessup, 
born November 21, 1872, was educated in the Academy, has never mar- 
ried, and is now his father's active manager on the home farm. 3. Thomas, 
bom in 1874, died in 1880. Mr. Wilson and his sons are staunch Repub- 
licans, and throughout his life he has been a member of the Back Creek 
Quaker Church. For over twenty-five j'ears he has served on the con- 
trolling board of the church, also an elder and a clerk in the monthly 
meeting for a long time. His long and honorable business career and 
prominence in church and civic affairs were worthily honored in 1890 
with his election to the state legislature in which he served one term. 

Joseph Newbt. A fine citizen, who knew farming, who was always 
ready to bear his share of responsibilities in the community, was the 
late Joseph Newby, who died at his home in Fairmount township on 
section sixteen, June 15, 1913. ]\Ir. Newby has spent practically all 
his life in Grant county, and belonged to one of the earliest families. 

Joseph Newby was born at the old Newby homestead in Fairmount 
township on August 21, 1857. He was fifty-six years of age at his death, 
and just at the climax of his powers and usefulness. His parents were 
Thomas W. and Sarah (Hill) Newby, both of whom were natives of 
Randolph county. North Carolina. They were children when their 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 541 

respective parents and families left North Cai'olina, and came north to 
Indiana. It was a typical emigration, one made with teams and wagon, 
and between their departure and their arrival in Indiana many days of 
travel iutei'veued, and there were many incidents to bi'eak the monotony 
of such a journey. Both families arrived in Grant county towards the 
close of the decade of the twenties, previous to the organization of Grant 
county, so that they are very properly classed among the pioneers and 
founders of civilization in this section of the state. Both the Newbys 
and the Hills got their first laud from the government, and improved 
homesteads in Fairmouut township, were early members of the Quaker 
church, and lived long and industrious lives. Thomas W. Newby grew 
up amid pioneer scenes, attended one of the old-fashioned log school 
houses, such as are described in the general history of this work, and 
always followed farming. About sixty-five years ago he and his wife 
were married, and they started out to make their fortune on a farm. 
There they lived until death closed their quiet and useful careers, he 
dying at the age of seventy-nine, and she when eighty-six years of age. 
All the qualities of good citizenship and upright, moral and Christian 
people belonged to Thomas W. Newby and wife. They had six children 
in their famih'. 

Joseph Newby, who was next to the youngest in the family and the 
youngest son, received his education in public schools that were consid- 
erably advanced above the character of those which his father had 
attended. After his marriage he settled on eighty acres of land, given 
him by his father, and thus had a substantial start towards success. He 
had as his companion a woman who was industrious, thrifty, and very 
attentive to the household and to the moral training of her children, 
and under such conditions they steadily prospered. During the thirty 
years of their residence on the farm in section sixteen of Fairmouut 
township, the eighty original acres grew to one hundred and twenty, and 
the entire place was well improved in buildings and cultivation. It is 
an attractive rural estate, and through the shade and fruit trees may 
be seen the front of the comfortable white house, while an evidence of 
farming thrift is the good red barn, standing near by. 

Mr. Newby was married in Delaware county, Indiana, on September 
30, 1879, to Miss Laura L. Foster. She was born in Davy county, North 
Carolina, December 25, 1857, and was ten years of age when her mother 
brought her to Madison county, Indiana. She was the daughter of 
Henderson W. Foster, who, though opposed to Secession, was forced to 
join the Southern army, and in consequence of ill health died a few 
mouths after his enlistment at the age of thirty years. Henderson W. 
Foster married Louise Ribelin, who was born in Davy county. North 
Carolina, of German parentage. Left a widow with two small children, 
she joined a party of Friends going north and in 1867 arrived in 
Indiana. She later married Josiah Winter, and they finally located on 
a farm in Fairmouut township of Grant county. There Mr. Winter died 
at the age of seventy-nine. In his religious views he was a Dunkard. 
His widow, who died July 24, 1896, when about sixty-nine years of 
age, passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Newbj'. She also in 
later life affiliated with the Dunkard Church. By her first marriage 
there were two children, one of them ilrs. Newby, and the other Louisa, 
the wife of Leroy Horner, of Mill township in Grant county. By his 
former marriage Mr. Winter had two sons and five daughters, the only 
one of whom now living is Mrs. Christianna Hiat of Madison county, 
Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Newby became the parents of the following children : 
1. Harmon T., born March 11, 1882, was educated in the common 
schools and a business college, and is now in the employ of the Santa Pe 



542 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Railroad Company at Las Vegas, New Mexico. He married Miss Lillian 
Withers. They have no children. 2. Arthur W., born November 17, 
1884, was educated in the Fairmount Academy and the Marion Busi- 
ness College, and is now managing the home estate for his mother. 
3. John F., born October 5, 1887, is a farmer in the township of Jeffer- 
son, and man-ied Ethel B. Corn, a daughter of Joseph Corn. They have 
two children, Grace M., and Ernest A. 4. Mary L., born August 25, 
1891, received a good education, attending Fairmount Academy, and is 
now the wife of James A. Corn, living in Fairmount township. Their 
children are Laura M., Jason I., and Evert Earl. During his career 
as a citizen, the late Mr. Newby voted the Republican ticket regularly, 
and his son has taken up the same political faith. Mrs. Newby is a mem- 
ber of the ^Methodist Protestant church. 

Hill Brothers. Vigorous enterprise has been the keynote in the 
successful establishment of Hill Brothers at Fairmount, where they 
carry on a butchering and meat refrigeration and market business which 
is one of the best managed plants of its kind to be found anywhere out- 
side of the largest cities. To furnish people with good food products has 
always been an honorable vocation, but in recent years it has come to be 
seen that such a service is one of the most important that man can ren- 
der to his fellow men. That is the sole business of Hill Brothers, and 
they desei-ve the greatest credit for the manner in which they are per- 
forming it. The firm comprises James T. Hill and S. Brooks Hill. 
Some mention of their individual careers and their families will be of 
interest in this history of Grant county and are briefly sketched in the 
following paragraphs. 

The parents were Israel and Sarah J. (Sharpe) Hill, both natives 
of Pennsylvania. The Hill family is of English and German origin, 
while the Sharpes are of German and Frencli extraction. Israel Hill 
and wife were married in Fulton county, and spent their lives there 
as farmers, the father being a member of the Primitive Baptist faith, 
while his wife was of the Christian denomination. Israel Hill died 
at the age of seventy-three and his wife followed him at the age of 
seventy-six. Their children are mentioned as follows: Louisiana is the 
wife of Jack Hixson, a farmer in ]Miami county, Ohio. Their three 
sons are Ira, Charles and Walter. Howard is a merchant at War- 
fordsburg, Pennsylvania, and married Norah Runyon, and their chil- 
dren are Cora and Verna. 

James T. Hill, the senior member* of the firm of Hill Brothers, 
and third in order of birth in the family, was born in Pennsylvania, in 
1868, received an education in the public schools about in the same man- 
ner as his brother, and starting out to make his own way, learned the 
butcher's trade at the National Soldiers Home in Dayton, Ohio. While 
at Dayton, he was married, and then established an enterprise as a 
breeder and raiser of fine hogs, of the improved Duroe Jersey strain. 
He did a good business in that line, raising from three hundred to four 
hundred every year. After eight years in that work he moved to Fair- 
mount City, in 1904, and became associated with his brother in the 
meat market business. These two have since combined their energy and 
experience in building up a flourishing enterprise. James T. Hill was 
first married at Dayton, Ohio, to Miss Fannie Heckman, of Montgomery 
county, that state. She was born, reared and educated in the vicinity 
of Dayton, and died five years after her marriage. The thi-ee children 
left at her death were Anna, Harry and Hallie, all of whom are now in 
the Fairmount public school. Mr. James T. Hill for his second wife 
married Miss Eva Bell Butts. She was a native of Montgomery county, 




ELIHU J. OREN 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 543 

where they were married. They are the parents of William B. and 
Mary G. 

S. Brooks Hill was born in the foothills of the Alleghany mountains 
in Fulton county, Pennsylvania, April 22, 1873. His early training 
and home influence were on a farm and he belonged to a thrifty Penn- 
sylvania family. He grew up and was educated in the common schools 
and first qualified himself for a career as a teacher. "When a boy he 
got his education by walking night and morning two and a half miles to 
a district school. Later he went to the county normal, and then spent 
three years as a teacher. 

S. Brooks Hill, after he gave up his occupation as a school teacher, 
having about that time reached his majority, moved out to Dayton, 
Ohio, and spent four years in the meat and grocery business. That was 
the foundation of his experience which enabled him to start out on his 
own account when he came to Fairmount in January, 1898. Here he 
first took the management of a local telephone company, and spent seven 
years in that work. In 1904, he established a meat market, and after a 
few months bought out his partner, and was then joined by his brother. 
The Hill Brothers enterprise is much above the average scope of a local 
meat market. They not only have a well equipped shop for disposing of 
their meat on the block, but maintain a slaughter house, and have a 
complete refrigerating plant for the preserving and curing of all their 
products. Electricity is the power which operates the entire plant. A 
large part of the business is the preparation of the meat consumed by 
nearly all the farmers in this section of Grant comity, and their equip- 
ment has been especially designed to meet the demands of this class of 
trade. By careful management and efficient service they have built up 
a very profitable business. 

Mr. S. Brooks Hill was married in Mercer county, Ohio, to Miss Caro- 
line Johnsman, who was bom in Mercer county on a farm, received a 
public school education, and has been a most helpful companion to her 
husband. Their children are : Thelma, now eleven years of age and 
attending the city schools; and Clemons Lament, who is five years 
of age. 

Milton B. Hill, the youngest of the Hill Brothers, was born in Fulton 
county, Pennsylvania, October 4, 1876. He married Bertha Lake, and 
they have two children, Vivian and Kittle. Mr. Hill resides on the old 
home farm in Fulton county, Pennsylvania. 

Elihu J. Oren. A resident of Monroe township for more than 
seventy years, and one of the best known and most successful farmers 
and citizens of that locality, Elihu J. Oren is a product of pioneer envir- 
onment and of the old-fashioned log school house, of the kind that has 
passed down into history along with the stage-coach and the hoop-skirt. 
The school days, even in that rough and primitive institution were lim- 
ited, and much of his education was obtained at his father's knee, and 
by such schooling as he was able to give himself in the oppoi'tunity of 
leisure. In spite of its many deficiencies, however, this old-fashioned 
training had a way of bringing out sober, industrious. God-fearing men, 
such as Elihu J. Oren himself, the kind of men who have proved the 
backbone and mainstay of our nation, and have reared up a steady new 
generation of able men and women for the honor of the country. 

Elihu J. Oren was born February 20, 1835, in Green county, Ohio, 
a son of Jesse and Elizabeth (Evans) Oren, the father a native of Ten- 
nessee, and the mother of southern Indiana. Col. Robert M. Evans, an 
uncle of Eliabeth Evans, platted and laid out the site of Evansville, 
Indiana. Elizabeth Evans was born in Davis county, Indiana. Jesse 
Oren, the father, was born December 12, 1806, and died September 13, 



544 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

1874. His father, John Oren, moved to Clinton county, Ohio, in 1818, 
and his people were Quakers. Jesse Oren was reared in Clinton county, 
Ohio, and on September 12, 1830. married Elizabeth Evans, who was 
born June 6, 1808, the daughter of John and Elizabeth Evans. Her 
death occurred IMay 8, 1S63. Jesse Oren and wife moved to Grant 
county with their family and reached Monroe township, November 12, 
1841. They had to cut a road from the Charles Atkinson place to the 
site of the eighty acres which the father had bought in the midst of the 
woods. Not an acre of the land was cleared and the iirst home of the 
family in this county was a rough cabin built of round logs, and with 
scarcely any furniture or creature comforts. Jesse Oren bought eighty 
acres, but soon afterwards a period of invalidism seized him and his son 
Elihu assumed the obligations for payment of this new laud. The nine 
children in the family of the parents were : John E., deceased ; ]Mrs. 
Margaret Skinner, deceased ; Elihu J. ; Mrs. Elizabeth Atkinson, de- 
ceased: ilrs. Rebecca S. Hunnicutt, deceased: Sarah Jane Benedict; 
Rachael Kirkpatrick, and Esther Foy, all three deceased : and Henry G. 
of Blackford eoiinty. The father of these children was an excellent 
scholar for his time, and in default of the poor schools that existed in 
this section of Indiana, he did much of the work of instruction among 
his growing children. 

Elihu J. Oren for a few terms attended the number eight school in 
Monroe tovrnship, and supplied the other deficiencies of his training 
with the wisdom of his father, and by close observation and practical 
experience. He lived with his father until the latter 's death, and con- 
tributed his labor to the support of the family and the care of his invalid 
father. He then came into possession of the home place of eighty acres 
and bought other land as he was able until at the present time he is the 
owner of two hundred acres, with eighty, acres in section 20, eighty acres 
in section 28, and he and liis son have a place of eighty acres in section 
32, all in Monroe township. The homestead is in section 28. Mrs. Oren 
also owns fifteen acres in Blackford county. The crops for 1912 on the 
Oren estate aggregated two thousand bushels of coni, twelve hundred 
bushels of oats, twenty tons of hay. He fed and wintered fifty -two hogs, 
and a considerable bunch of cattle. Each year about seventy hogs are 
sent to market from Oren farm, and the other herds of stock include 
about a carload of cattle every year, some twenty sheep and eleven horses 
for the work of the farm. Mr. Oren has a very comfortable homestead 
and it is one of the oldest houses in this section of the county, having 
been built under his supervision in 1861. more than half a century ago. 
All the lumber for the dwelling was hand-dressed, its walls and framing 
were put together very strong, and there are few houses of modern con- 
struction which would stand so long as this one. The dwelling is situ- 
ated on an eminence, and both house and barns are painted a dark green. 
The barn was finished in October, 1876. 

^Ir. Oren was married March 6, 1871, to iliss Mary Townsend, a 
daughter of James F. Townsend. Two of their children died in infancy, 
and they have reared ten, named as follows: Jason, of Gas City; Otto, 
of Carroll county, ]\Iissouri : Jasper, at home in ilonroe township : ]\Irs. 
Bertha Atkinson of ilon'roe township ; James E., a dairyman of Center 
township : Bruce C, a blacksmith at Upland in Jefferson township ; 
Fletcher H.. of Upland ; Warren, at home ; Stella Atkinson, of Gas City ; 
Charles, at home. 

In the community life of Monroe township 'Sir. Oren has long been 
an important factor. He is a Democrat and has taken active and influ- 
ential part in party councils. In 1872 he was chosen to the office of 
township trustee, and by reelection served for eight years consecutively. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 545 

In 1884 he was again a successful candidate for the same office, and 
served for four j^ears, making twelve years in all. He has frequently- 
attended state and congressional conventions as a delegate, and was a 
delegate to the last congressional convention in the campaign of 1912. 
Religiously he supports the Universalist faith. Fraternally he is very 
prominent in several organizations. He became a member of the Masonic 
lodge at Jonesboro in 1860, and now affiliates with the Arcana Lodge F. 
& A. M., of Upland, of which he is a charter member and was the first 
Master. He belongs to the Chapter and the Council at Hartford City. 
He affiliates with Shidler Lodge No. 352, I. 0. 0. F. at Upland, and is 
also a member of the Encampment. He belongs to the Hartford City 
Lodge No. 625 of the B. P. 0. E. Mr. Oren was the iirst master and a 
charter member of the Arcana lodge of Masons then at Arcana, now lo- 
cated at Upland. He has represented the ^Masonic order in the Grand 
Lodge freciuently. He has filled all the chairs in the Odd Fellows 
subordinate lodge and also the encampment, and has represented both 
divisions in state meetings. He served as a delegate to the state meeting 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks at Anderson, lud., in 
1912, and also at Lafayette in 1913, representing Hartford City Lodge, 
No. 625. 

Henry A. Hanley. A number of years ago prosperity came to 
Henry A. Hanley, and entirely through his own efforts and through the 
medium of progressive agriculture and stock raising. Mr. Hanley, 
when a child lost his father, as a result of exposure and disease, during 
service in the Union aimiy. That caused him to be thrown upon his own 
resources at an early age, and while his education was neglected he grew 
up familiar with hard work from a tender age, and has earned his own 
support from a time when most modern children are in the lower grades 
of grammar school. Mr. Hanley had the perseverance and the ambition 
to succeed, and long since arrived at a place where his success has been 
subject of commendation by his neighbors. 

Henrj^ Alva Hanley, the third in his parents' family, was born near 
Hartford City, Indiana, November 25, 1857. He comes down through 
a family of respectable and worthy people, and his grandfather lived for 
a number of years in Ohio, where he clied. He was a farmer. Of the 
grandparents' children, Washington, Burr, James and Lafayette Avere 
all born in Ohio, and later settled in Indiana, where they followed 
farming. The only survivor is Lafayette, who is a retired farmer living 
in iluncie. Burr Hanley was born in Ohio, and was a young man when 
he came to Indiana, and started life as a farmer in Blackford county, 
near Hartford City. Soon after the outbreak of the Civil war he 
enlisted as a private iu the Thirty-four Indiana Infantry, his brother 
Lafayette being iu the same regiment, and after some months of sei-vice 
contracted the measles and was sent home on a furlough of fortj' days. 
Apparently recovering from his illness, he returned to join his com- 
mand, but about twenty days later was stricken with a severe cold, and 
his brother Lafayette sent him back home. When within twenty miles 
of his home, and at Muncie, he died, and his body was brought on to 
Blackford county, where it was buried, but subseciuentl.y was removed 
to the Masonic cemeterj' near Hartford Citj', where it now rests beside 
that of his second wife. Burr Hanley first married a 3Iiss Roberts, and 
their two daughters were : Evaline, who is married and lives in Martin's 
Ferry, Ohio and Permelia, who died after her marriage to Sherman 
Fields. Burr Hanley 's second wife was Hannah Atkinson, who was 
born in Indiana. After ilr. Hanley 's death she married William Ord, 
and she died in Hartford City when thirty-seven j-ears of age. There 
was one son by her marriage to Mr. Ord, Sherman, who died accidentally 
vol. n— T 



546 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

in a saw mill at Portland, Oregon. Burr and Hannah Hanley had the 
follo^\iug children : John, who died after his marriage to Mary Deeren, 
who now lives in Muncie, and has a family ; William, who is married and 
has a family and lives in Alexandria, Indiana; Henry A.; and ilary, 
who died in early girlhood. 

Henry A. Hanley was reared until nine years of age in the home 
of his parents in Blackford county, lived with his step-father a few 
years, and at the age of nine was taken into the home of James Pugh, 
a farmer in Jefferson township of Grant county. That was his home, 
and there he learned the lessons of industry, but very little by attend- 
ance at school, until he was twenty-four years of age. With his savings 
he then bought forty acres of land, in section fourteen of Jefferson 
township, and was the third successive owner of that land, its pioneer 
settler and owner having been a Mr. Oswald, who got it direct from the 
government. Mr. Hanley has continued his business career in this 
vicinity ever since, improved his first estate and has developed and 
increased his property until his farm will now bear favorable compari- 
son with that of any to be found in the township. The forty acres were 
first increased to eighty acres, and subsequently he bought eighty acres 
lying in section fifteen. It is in section fourteen that a few years ago he 
built his fine ten-room modern home, and in 1890 put up a substantial 
red barn on a foundation forty by forty feet. His other farm buildings 
and all his cultivation and improvement show the thrifty farmer. A 
believer in the modem system of cultivation which conserves the fer- 
tility of the soil, he keeps a lot of high-grade stock, and feeds prac- 
tically all his crops to his cattle and hogs. The most commendable thing 
of all is that all of the property thus described represents the concrete 
achievements of a career which was begun practically in poverty and 
with many handicaps such as the majority of Grant county farmers did 
not have to contend with. 

In Jefferson township in the spring of 1882, Mr. Hanley married 
Miss Emma Gadbury, who was born in Licking township, Blackford 
county, Indiana, in February, 1863, and was reared and educated in that 
vicinity. She died at her home in Grant county April 1, 1891, and is 
buried in the Elizabethto^vn cemetery. Four children born to them 
are named as follows: Tillbury, who died in infancy; Louis, the man- 
ager of his father 's homestead, and one of the enterprising young farmers 
of Grant county, married Lois Simons of Jefferson township, who was 
reared and educated in this locality, and they have one child, Herbert 
Simons; Nira Myrtle, who is a graduate of the Upland high school; 
and Cora May, who is likewise well educated, and is the wife of Samuel 
Bishop, of the state of Montana. Mr. Hanley 's parents were com- 
municants of the Methodist Episcopal church, and he is likewise of the 
same denomination and attends worship at the Shiloh Methodist Epis- 
copal church. He and his sons are of the Democratic political faith. 

Anderson D. Mittank. Few families of Grant county have been 
longer identified with the practical working of the farm, and with civic 
and social affairs than the Mittauks, whose residence here began nearly 
eighty years ago, and who as farmers, as business men, as faithful 
workers for church, morality, and good government, have been effective 
factors in their community. Anderson D. Mittank has spent practically 
all his life in Jeft'ersou township, is the owner of a beautiful rural estate 
in section twenty-nine, and is a man of practical energy and business 
ability, his standing in the community also being well indicated by the 
fact that he has served as president of the Farmers State Bank of 
Matthews, since the reorganization of that institution in 1910. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 547 

Mr. Mittauk's grandfather was Christopher Mittank, a native of 
Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and of Pennsylvania parents and of 
Dutch ancestry. At one time the name was spelled JMettong, but suffered 
the usual American change to a form which is more easily pronounced. 
Christopher Mittank married a Bedford county girl, and after several 
children were born to them in that state, including David, father of 
Anderson D., the family moved in 1831 to Ohio, and in 1835 continued 
their pioneer migration as far as Delaware county, Indiana. Christo- 
pher Mittank found a home on a new tract of land in Washington town- 
ship, and went through all the experiences characteristic of pioneer 
life, in trying to improve his land and make satisfactory provision for 
his gi'owing household of children. 

Christopher Mittank since died in Delaware county, and both he 
and his wife were past seventy years of age. They were active mem- 
bers of the New Light Christian church, and honorable and upright 
souls, loved by all in their community. Besides David, there were several 
other children : John, Michael, and George, the last named beiug killed 
early in the war while fighting the battles of the Union army. John 
and Michael are still living, the former in Pendleton, Madison county, 
Indiana, and tlie latter at Fairmount. Of the daughters, Hannah is the 
widow of George Kolp, of Bureau county, Illinois; Catherine died after 
her marriage to Coleman Sanders, leaving a family of children ; Eliza is 
the wife of John Dunlap. near Fairmount, and they have no children; 
Mary died after her marriage to Albert McCoy, of Delaware county. 

David Mittank, who was born in Pennsylvania, November 15, 1824, 
was seven years of age when the family went to Ohio, and four years 
later became a resident of Grant county. He grew up to manhood, in 
the midst of pioneer conditions, and his schooling was of the most limited 
character. After his marriage he started out to work out his salvation 
on a place in Jefferson township. He first leased land, the old 
McPherren farm, the property of his wife's father, and situated on 
the ilississinewa river. There he lived, developed a good home, bought 
out the other heirs to the estate, and finally was possessed of a homestead 
of one hundred and thirty acres. His death occurred on that place, 
November 16, 1897. He came of age during the declining years of the 
Whig party, and probably supported that organization by his vote, and 
when the Republicans perfected a party organization in 1856, he was 
one of the supporters of its first candidates, and steadily voted that 
ticket until his death. However, he was reared in a family of Demo- 
crats, and according to the belief of that party. He was long an active 
member of the Shiloh Methodist church, in Jefferson township. 
Throughout his career he was known and respected for his upright- 
ness, his honesty, his worthy citizenship, and his thrift and enterprise. 
While he had no early advantages in education, he became by self 
effort a thorough student, read history extensively, was constantly 
studying the Bible, and it is said that by virtue of his remarkable 
memory seldom forgot a fact acquired through reading or observation, 
and could repeat for a long time afterwards the substance, and even 
the greater part of the words of the sermons which he heard. Few 
men have so splendid a natural endowment of intellect. 

David Mittank was married in Jefferson township, October 3, 1850, 
to Margaret McKeeber. She was born in Clinton county, Ohio, July 29, 
1833, and when two years of age was brought to Grant county, so that 
practically all her life was spent in this section of Indiana. Her 
parents were Moses and Sarah (Moore) ilcKeeber, both natives of Vir- 
ginia, but were married in Clinton county, Ohio, in 1832. Her father 
on coming to Grant county bought land in Jefferson to-miship, and set- 
tled in the rough log cabin which was almost the only improvement on 



548 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

the place. The cabin had no floor, and for a time the fleas were so 
numerous that the family suffered constant discomfort from their 
ravages. Moses McKeeber died on the old homestead in middle life, 
while his widow married a Rev. Mr. Wheat of the Methodist Protestant 
church, and had one child by that union, and was afterwards twice 
married, but without children by either of her last husbands. Mrs. 
Margaret Mittank, wife of David, died June 16, 1900, at the home she 
had lived on practically all her life. She was for many years a devoted 
member of the Shiloh ilethodist Episcopal church. Her children were 
as follows: John W. and Amanda, both of whom died in childhood; 
Amariah, who lives on a farm in Jefl'erson to'miship, is married and of 
her three sons and two daughters all are married, except one son; 
Mary Etta is the wife of William Tibbett, of Marion, and they have 
four sons; Edward died in infancy. 

Anderson D. Mittank was bom on the old home farm, February 17, 
1861, received a public school education, and as soon as he reached his 
majority, he started out on his own account, and has effected a generous 
prosperity. He now owns the old McKeeber homestead, where his 
father lived for so many j^ears, comprising one hundred and thirty- 
three acres in sections twenty-one and forty-eight and half acres in sec- 
tion twenty-nine. All his land is kept up to the highest notch of modern 
cultivation and improvement, and in 1908 a comfortable rural dwell- 
ing of eight rooms, painted brown, and with all the modern furnishings 
and facilities was built. The bam is now about seventeen years old, 
and all the improvements show how progressive a farmer Mr. Mittank is. 

Anderson D. Mittank was married at Upland in 1885, to Miss Clara 
Gadburj', who was born in Licking to\vnship of Blackford county, 
Indiana, in September, 1861. Her parents were James and Mary A. 
MeVicker Gadbury, the former of whom died on his father's farm in 
Licking township, in Blackfoi'd county, having been born April 25, 1833, 
and dying May 12, 1891 ; while his wife, who was born in Ohio, May 14, 
1832, was brought in childhood to Blackford county and died there 
December 28, 1874. James Gadbury was an active member of the 
United Brethren church, a Democrat in politics, and a prominent and 
influential citizen of his community. JMrs. Mittank, who was reared and 
educated in Blackford county, was one of six children, as follows: Hulda, 
who died when ten years of age ; Mrs. Mittank ; Emma, who died after her 
marriage to Henry Hauley, and left three children ; Riley, who is a farmer 
in Licking township of Blackford county, has two sons and three daugh- 
ters: John, who lives on the old homestead in Blackford county, has five 
children ; Jennie, who died when nine months old. To the marriage of 
Jlr. and ilrs. I\Iittank has been horn one child, William B.. on Feb- 
ruaiy 21. 1SS6. His education was in the public schools, and since 
taking up the serious responsibilities of life he has proved a capable 
manager of his father's farm in Jefferson township. William B. ilit- 
tank maiTied Gertrude Sutton, of Jefferson township, and to their mar- 
riage two children have been born as follows: Eva JMarjorie, born 
March 28, 1909; and Opal C, born December 10, 1911. Mrs. Mittank 
is an active member of the Kingsley ^Methodist Episcopal church. 

Wakren Fergus. In 1832, one year after Grant county govern- 
ment was organized, the Fergus family was transplanted from Ohio to 
the unbroken wilderness and hills and valleys of Jefferson township. 
Many lives have entered into the development of Grant county, and of 
those of pioneer stock none have done more credit to their length}' 
residence than those of the Fergus kith and kin. Warren Fergus, 
whose ample and fiiiitful acres and establishment makes him one of 
the most prosperous of Grant county's farmers, was bom here before 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 549 

the county had finished the first decade of its existence, and is the 
grandson of a patriot who bore arms for the colonies in the war of the 
Revolution. 

His ancestry is Scotch-Irish, and his grandfather, Francis Fergus, 
was born September 8, 1752, in the north of Ireland, and of that people 
of Protestant lineage, who several generations before, had been trans- 
planted from Scotland to the northern counties of Ireland. Francis 
Fergus with two brothers came to America some time previous to the 
Revolutionary war, and he and one of his brothers took up arms and 
fought in behalf of the colonies, during that struggle. The other 
brother, however, was a Toiy, and in his loyalty to the mother country 
returned during the course of the war to England, and remained there 
until the final triumph of the American cause, when he returned to this 
side of the Atlantic and spent the rest of his years in the independent 
colony. Francis Fergus and his brothers lived in Virginia, the former 
was a farmer, and after the death of his wife, whose maiden name was 
McCormiek, of the same family which produced the makers of harvest- 
ing machinery, he went to live with a dai^gliter in Tennessee, where he 
died suddenly, September 28, 1841, when eighty-nine years of age. He 
and his family were Presbyterians in religious faith. 

Sawyer B. Fergus, a son of Francis and father of Warren, was one 
of the younger in a family of children, and was born in Rockbridge 
county, Virginia, March 18, 1802. When a young man he joined his 
brother James in Miami county, Ohio, and later had an experience in 
running a flat-boat down the i\Iississippi River cari-ying a great variey 
of produce from the upper Ohio Valley to New Orleans. In the mean- 
time in Miami county, in October, 1829, occurred his marriage with 
Julia McFadden, who was born of Pennsylvania parents and of Scotch- 
Irish stock. Her birth occurred in Miami county, Ohio, December 31, 
1809. In 1832 Sawyer B. Fergus and his family of two children came 
to Indiana, locating in the wilds of Jefferson township in Grant couuty. 
As one of the very first settlers in his community he had to cut a roadway 
two miles through the timber, in order to reach his land. His title to 
the land was received by patent direct from the government, and there 
had never been an improvement made on the place, until he erected hia 
log cabin. Some years later that rude shelter was replaced by a good 
frame house, and there he lived prospering quietly, and steadily improv- 
ing and increasing his possessions until, with one hundred and fifty-one 
acres in his estate and after providing liberally for his family and per- 
forming his varied obligations to the commuuity, he died honored and 
esteemed, June 24, 1864. First a Whig and later a Republican in poli- 
tics, he became a member of the Methodist church, and was always 
ready to do his part in community affairs. His wife, Julia (McFadden) 
Fergus died at the old home in Jefferson township in 1882 at the age of 
seventy-three. She likewise was a working member of the Shiloh Metho- 
dist church, and she and her husband rest side by side in the old ceme- 
tery at that place. Her children were named as follows: Samuel, Mary, 
Clinton, Edwin, Warren, Harriet and Juliet, twins; Rachael, Sarah J., 
Margaret, Sawyer A., and James. All these grew to manhood and 
womanhood and most of them were married. Four sons and three 
daughters still live, and of these Sarah J. and Margaret are unman-ied, 
The oldest of the living children is eighty years and the j^oungest sixty- 
one. 

Warren Fergus was born on the old farm near his present home in 
Jefferson township, September 21, 1837. His early life was spent in the 
primitive surroundings of that time and his educational advantages were 
more practical than theoretical. When eighteen years of age he started 
for California, but on account of the "Border Ruffian" war of 1856, he 



550 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

only went as far west as Kansas. He traveled all over Kansas, then 
practically unsettled except by Indians. In 1860 he was mamed and 
in the following j'ear he and his young wife went out to Iowa, locating 
in Paige county. There on August 9, 1862, he responded to the call for 
volunteers .in defense of the Union, enlisting in Company F of the 
Twenty-Third Iowa Infantry. As a private he served until his honor- 
able discharge, which was delivered to him on August 11, 1865. He 
made a splendid record as a soldier, was always on duty, never in the 
hospital, was never wounded nor captured, and the record of the Iowa 
regiment to which he belonged is practically the record of his individual 
service. He was in many of the great campaigns of the war, including 
the long series of operations about Vicksburg, Fort Gibson, Raymond, 
Champion Hill, Black River Bridge, where the regiment lost its colonel, 
through the forty-nine days of the actual siege of Vicksburg, later 
went down to New Orleans, and into Texas, participated in the Red 
River Campaign, where he saw some of his hardest fighting, was at 
the siege of Mobile, and so continued until the close of the great conflict. 

In the fall of 1866 I\Ir. Fergus returned to Grant county where 
he was born, and bought eighty acres of land. There he began 
farming and carpenter work, a trade which he had learned in young 
manhood, and has since enjoyed a degree of success which ranks him 
among the most progressive men of Grant county. His estate now com- 
prises one hundred and eighty acres in Jefferson township, besides sixty 
acres in Washington township, Delaware county, Indiana. The property 
is all well improved and well kept, and about thirty years ago Mr. 
Fergus built a fine barn on a foundation fifty by fifty-six feet, and also 
a comfortable nine-room white brick dwelling house. 

The wife whom he married in 1860 in Jefferson township was Miss 
Nancy Jane Horner, who was born in Ohio, September 9, 1837, and 
when fifteen years of age was brought to Jefferson township by her 
parents, Andrew and Nancy (Walker) Horner. Her father was born 
in Pennsylvania, and her mother in Rockbridge, Virginia, and after 
their marriage in the latter state, moved to Miami county, Ohio, where 
they improved a homestead, later going to Darke county, Ohio, and 
afterwards to Jefferson to^^^lship in Grant county, Indiana. Mr. 
Horner was an industrious citizen and hard worker and after a worthy 
lifetime died in Jefferson township in 1873 at the age of sixty-seven. 
His wife died later at the home of her daughter, Mi-s. Fergus, April 1, 
1895, aged eighty-seven years. They were Presbyterians, and Mr. 
Horner was a Republican in polities. Mrs. Fergus has one brother 
living, Calvin Horner, who is a farmer at Upland. 

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Fergus are as follows: Ida M., 
is the wife of Eugene Heal, living in Delaware county, Indiana, and 
their children are Caroline and Alma. Oscar W. lives on a ranch near 
Santa Ana, California, and his children are Nevada, Floyd, Fern, and 
Grant. Emery W. and Elnora E. are twins, and the former by his 
marriage to Maude Lang has a son, Ernest R., and their home is in 
Santa Barbara, California. Elnora E. married J. William Richards, a 
fanner in Jefferson township, and they had one son, Ord, who died 
aged two and a half years. Lois A. is the wife of D. L. Richards, a 
sketch of whom will be found elsewhere in this publication. Orvil L. is 
a farmer in Delaware county, Indiana, and by his marriage to Delia 
Owen has two children, Eva and Forrest. Edward C. lives near Santa 
Ana, California, on a ranch, and married Pearl Powers. Clyde H. 
operates the home farm and married Olive Vida Watson of the state 
of California, and their one child is WaiTen R., Mrs. Fergus is a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian cluin-li and 'Sir. Fergus attends that church. 
In politics he is aligned with the new Progressive party. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 551 

John H. Moobe. Successful and prosperous in all liis undertakings 
in Monroe township, it is highly probable that John H. Moore is best 
known in these parts as a horse breeder and owner of fast horses. In 
this he is especially prominent, and he has an aggregation of horseflesh 
on his acres from year to year that is highly creditable to his judgment 
in those mattei's, the while he has bred and sold a number of horses that 
have gained lasting names on the race track. He is the owner of a 
considerable farm land in the township and county, and has accumulated 
a goodly portion of property of varied nature in the district. A man of 
the keenest business qualities, he has never stood a loss on any of his real 
estate transactions, in many instances doubling his money and always 
realizing a handsome profit. His property, of a farming nature, lies 
mainly in section 27, and his is among the finest firm land in the state. 
Eighty acres in Monroe township, devoted to grazing purposes, and one 
hundred and twenty acres in Jeifei-son township, put to the same use, 
comprise a part of his farming properties. 

John H. Moore was born in New Cumberland, Guernsey county, Ohio, 
on October 20, 1855, and is the son of Henry and Rachel (Seaton) 
]\Ioore. The liather was a volunteer during the Civil war, and was 
killed at the Battle of the Wilderness, while serving as a member of 
Company G, 112th Ohio Volunteer Infantry in the Union army. His 
widow was left almost defenseless as regards material welfare with a 
family of six small children, all of whom she succeeded in raising to 
years of maturity. When the father found that it would be necessary to 
leave his little family, despite the fact that he could not provide for them 
in his absence, he bought a small place of three acres in Muskingum 
county, Ohio, and there established the mother and children. When he 
went away the mother heroically applied herself to the task of support- 
ing her family, and the death of the husband and father on the field of 
battle made necessary her continued activity in that work. She sewed 
and performed every kind of honest labor that came to her hand, but she 
maintained the growing family in comparative comfort, and gave them 
some sort of schooling, and when she died in October, 1901, she departed 
this life with the knowledge that she had been able to establish each of 
her children firmly in the way of life. The children are named as 
follows: Mary, the wife of George Lane, of Zanesville, Ohio; Charles, 
of Muskingum county, Ohio; John H., of this review; Andrew, of Perry 
county, Ohio ; William, who was struck by lightning and killed in Guern- 
sey county, Ohio, in 1883. 

John H. IMoore left home at the age of eighteen years and came to 
Upland in October, 1874. He applied himself to such tasks as came to 
his hand, and his first woi-k was in husking corn at $12 a month. He 
then went to work clearing land for $9.25 an acre, and while thus engaged 
just about made his board. In 1875 and 1876 he worked on a farm at 
the wage of $18 a month, and in 1877 he rented a piece of land and 
raised a fine crop of grain. In the fall of 1877 he bought eight head of 
big. raw boned cattle for $100 and found after fattening them for the 
market that he was in a position to make some money in that enterprise, 
after Avhich he continued to feed live stock and crop his rented land on 
shares. In 1881 he engaged in a partnership with an acquaintance and 
they conducted a buying and selling business in live stock for the six 
years following, when he married and settled elsewhere. For twelve 
years thereafter he lived in Upland, engaged in the hotel business. 
Diiring that time he invested $755 in a piece of corner property in 
Upland, which he held for eighteen years, renting it meantime, and then 
sold it when the oil and gas boom was on for $2,550. His hotel, which 
cost him $1,400, was a place suitable to accommodate forty guests, and 
in 1900 he traded the place for an eighty acre farm, where he now 



552 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

resides, and which is held assessable at $110 an acre. AVheu Mr. ^Moore 
moved on this farm it had no buildings suitable for a dwelling, but he 
erected a nice home and also some barns. Through his wife, ^Ir. Moore 
has added eighty acres of desirable land to his other possessions, she 
having been the owner of that when she married him. 

"When Mr. iloore went to live on his present farm, the land was 
gi-eatly impoverished, but he has since that time successfully built it up 
to a high state of productiveness. He is a firm believer in the conserva- 
tion of the soil through the breeding of live stock, and he has a fine herd of 
twenty head of Hereford and Shorthorn cattle. He has twelve horses, all 
high bred roadsters and racers, and for fifteen years he has been a noted 
breeder in these parts. Several well known horses have been foaled on 
his premises, and he has sold a number of famous racers from his stables. 
In 1904, Dolly Etta C, with a record of 2 :19 -A, and a product of his 
stables, brought him a fancy price, and others that have gained name 
and fame in racing circles are Coast Marie, 2 :11 :25 ; Rock Line, 2 :16 ; 
Princess ^Margrave, about three years old, and starting the season of 
1913, which won the three-year-old in Muncie, Ind.. and he sold her for 
$1,175 to S. B. Smith of Chicago. She is now in Wisconsin and has never 
lost a race ; Colored Girl, 2 :22 :5, is another well known horse of his. 
In addition, Mr. Moore has several high bred colts that promise well 
for the future. 

Mr. iloore got his start in fast horses by securing a well known racing 
mare, Alexis, owned by Alvin Dickinson. This mare has produced 
several fine racers, and three of her foals have been sold from his stables 
at an average price of $1,162.50. One of them, Rockline, won first money 
at Manchester, Indiana, in the fall of 1912 in the 2 :22 class. 

On March 24, 1887, Mr. Moore was married to Mrs. Minnie Johnson, 
of Upland, and to them has been born one child, Bertha, who is now 
deceased. 

ilr. I\Ioore is a Republican, and he and his wife are members of the 
church of the Friends. 

William Alonzo Bole. The residence of the Bole family in Jef- 
ferson township dates back to the year 1877. In section twelve of that 
township, one of the most productive and valuable farms in the com- 
munity is that of Mr. Bole, who in later years has retired largely from 
active participation in farming, but has sons who are carrying forward 
the work and continue to increase the prosperity so long enjoj'ed by this 
family. 

The name Bole is of Dutch origin, and Grandfather William Bole 
was bom in Pennsylvania in 1791, and died in Shelby count}', Indiana, 
in 1862. He was married in Pennsjdvania, and they moved out to Ohio 
and lived at Georgetown in Brown countj', where all their children 
were born. Their family were : David, John, William, Abraham, and 
James, and four daughters, Jane, Ann, Elizabeth and Mary. 

William Bole, father of the Jefferson township resident, was born 
in Brown county, Ohio, in 1814, and though reared on a farm, early in 
life he began an apprenticeship at the shoemaker's trade, and finally 
located at Neville, in Clermont county, Ohio, where he man-ied Rosanua 
A. Melvin, who was born at Snow Hill, Maryland, in 1810, and came to 
Ohio with her father, William Melvin, who located at Neville, on the 
Ohio River. William Melvin was likewise a shoemaker, and William 
Bole worked in the same town with him after his marriage, but later 
moved to Foster's Landing in Kentucky, and in 1856 brought his wife 
and three children to Faj'ette county, Indiana, later lived both in Madi- 
son and Henry counties, and finally in Delaware county. In 1874 he 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 553 

moved to Grant county, but returned to Muncie, where his death oecured 
in 1898 at the age of eighty-four years. His wife passed away in 1895 
and she too was past eighty years of age. William Alouzo Bole, the 
oldest of the family, was born at Neville, Ohio, March 6, 1841. His 
sister Melissa, born in 1845, married J. S. Petty, a prominent and well- 
known man whose death occurred in Martinsville, Indiana. For her 
second husband she married a Mr. Fisk, a Massachusetts banker, and 
since his death her home has been in ]\Iuucie. She was at one time a 
skilled instrumental musician, and is a cultured and highly intelligent 
woman. She had two sons : Wilber and Walter, both of whom died 
after being married. James M. Bole, brother of William A. Bole, is a 
farmer in Jefferson township, and has a family. 

William Alonzo Bole grew up in his father's home in the different 
localities of their residence, and was still under age when he enlisted 
September 5, 1861, in Company E of Eighth Indiana Infantry. One of 
his early engagements was the battle of Pea Ridge, Arkansas, and in the 
course of that conflict he passed his twenty-first birthday. With his 
regiment he saw a long and varied military service. From the early 
Missouri and Arkansas campaigns, the regiment went east of the Mis- 
sissippi, and took part in the battles preliminary to the capture of 
Vicksburg, at Fort Gibson, Raymond, Jackson, Champion Hill, Black 
River Bridge, and the Siege of Vicksburg. The regiment later Avas 
sent to the east, and was placed under the command of Sheridan, which 
valiant leader they followed in the battles of Winchester and Cedar 
Creek. He was never in the hospital a day, never wounded or cap- 
tured. On returning home to Delaware county, he took up the quiet 
vocation of farming, but after five years learned telegraphy, and be- 
came an operator. While living at Muncie, he married Miss Ida V. 
Hill, who was born in Indiana and died two years after their marriage. 
The one son of that union is Robert Bole, who is married and lives in 
California. In 1877 Mr. Bole came to Jefferson township in Grant 
county, and here married Mrs. Maiy D. (Havens) Payne. She was 
born in Mill township of Grant county, July 29, 1845, was reared in 
Jefferson township until her marriage, and represents an old and 
prominent family in Grant county. Her pai-ents were Jonathan and 
GabrieUa (Clark) Havens, her father a native of Ohio, and her mother 
of Pennsylvania. They married and came at an early day to Grant 
county, where Jonathan Havens improved a farm in the midst of the 
timber in Jefferson township, and spent the rest of his years there until 
his death in 1863 when forty years of age. His wife is still living, her 
home being in Fowlerton. For further information concerning the 
Havens family, the reader is referred to the sketch of Jonathan Havens, 
elsewhere in this volume. 

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Bole are as follows: Roily, born 
October 14, 1875, educated in the public schools, a resident of Hartford 
City, married Ann Hickman, and they have four children, two sons and 
two daughters, Clarence, Robert, Clara and Pauline. Capitola, born 
November 12, 1877, is the wife of Alonzo G. Monroe, a farmer of Jeffer- 
son township. Their living children are four sons and one daughter: 
Raymond, Doris, Denvard, Dwight and Dean. Winifred, born in" 1880, 
is the wife of Walter Deddys of Hartford City, and they have one son 
and two daughters: Helen, Catherine and John. Jesse, born in 1882, 
is unmarried, and is the active superintendent of his father's farm of 
one hundred acres, a place thoroughly improved and kept up to the 
best standards of Jefferson county country life. Jennie is the wife of 
D\dght Blumer of Toronto, Ohio, and they have two sons and a daugh- 
ter, Clifford, William and Helen. Arley E. lives at home, and also 
assists in managing the farm. He was well educated in the local high 



554 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

school and in a business college. Mr. Bole belongs to the Christian 
church, while his wife is of the Primitive Baptist. He is a Republican 
in national politics, and in local affairs gives the strength of his influence 
in every movement to make life better and more comfortable iu his town- 
ship and county. His three sons are all members of the Socialist party. 

James Noah Johnson. Of the old-time families of Grant county, 
none better deserve perpetuation in the biographical annals of this section 
than that of Johnson, the first record of whom begins here in 1835, only 
a few years after Grant county was organized, and which has been con- 
tinued with honor down to the present. The Johnsons have for years 
been reckoned among the largest land holders in the county, and as they 
acquired their property by good business judgment and strictest honesty, 
so likewise were they always worthy factors in the development and in 
the civic and social activities of the county. 

The late J. Noah Johnson, who died at his home at Upland in 1893, 
was of the third generation of the family in its identity with Grant 
county, and his children in turn have taken honored positions in the 
social and business affairs of this county. He was born on the old 
Johnson home in Jefferson township in 1858. His grandfather John 
Johnson of Scotch ancestry and of that substantial stock which formed 
so important an element in early Pennsylvania settlement, and of course 
of Presbyterian faith, was born in Pennsylvania, March 22, 1787, was 
a pioneer setler in Ohio, and spent most of his active career in Guernsey 
county of that state, where he died in 1862. He was a man of enter- 
prise who saw much beyond his immediate horizon, and one evidence of 
this was given when in 1835 he came to Indiana, and entered one hun- 
dred and sixty acres in section eight of Jefferson township in Grant 
county, and entered land to twice that amount in Delaware county. 
Securing this land, he returned to his old home in Guernsey county, 
where he lived until his death. He was married in that county to Mary 
Burns, and her birth also occurred in Pennsylvania, so far as known, 
its date being October 17, 1793. She died in Guernsey county in 1866. 
Both were strict adherents of the Presbyterian church. Their children 
were named as follows: John, James, Jane, William, Ebenezer, Jess, 
Martha and Nancy. All these children were married except Jess, who 
is now the only survivor, and is a resident of Mill township, this county. 
James, Nancy, and John many years ago came out and settled on the 
land entered Ijy their father in Indiana. Nancy married a Mr. Crow 
and they spent their lives in Delaware and Grant counties, Indiana, 
dying on the Crow farm, now occupied by W. 0. Modley, near Matthews. 
John J. died not many years after he came to his father's farm in 
Jefferson township. Grant county. 

James Johnson, who was born in Guernsey county, Ohio, November 
2, 1821, was married July 4, 1843, in that county to Elizabeth Schriver, 
who was born in Guernsey county of German ancestry in 1825. In a 
month or two after their marriage they came out to Indiana, and took 
possession of the quarter section of land in Jefferson township entered 
by his father in 1835. Though the early settlers had been at work for 
ten or fifteen years, Jefferson township still presented a great expanse 
of uncleared wilderness, and it was in the midst of the woods that 
James Johnson and wife began life in a log cabin. Eventually they de 
veloped their land into a beautiful farm, and the substantial frame 
house which finally replaced the log cabin is still in a state of fine 
repair, and occupied by the granddaughter of James Johnson. Besides 
the large dwelling house, James Johnson put up many other buildings, 
cleared up a large acreage for cultivation, and actually added by his 
own labor and management thousands of dollars in practical value to 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 555 

his home community. Few men of that time were more successful than 
James Johnson, who extended his possessions until at one time he was 
the owner of more than three thousand acres, most of which was situated 
in Grant county. He raised more cattle and sheep than any other man 
in Jefferson township, and was also an extensive dealer in timber. His 
death occurred at the old homestead in Jefferson township, December 1, 
1908, when in advanced years. His wife passed away in January, 1902. 
They were Presbyterians, and belonged to the strict sect of that religion, 
and endeavored to bring up all their children in the same faith. Their 
children were John, Solomon, Emma and James Noah, all of whom were 
farmers, and were married and had children of their own except Solo- 
mon, who, while married, has no children. 

The late J. Noah Johnson spent his early life on the old homestead, 
was a farmer, inherited much of his father's business ability, and 
increased the talents inherited from the preceding generation. He lived 
on the farm in Jefferson township until after his wife's death, when he 
moved to Fairmount. He was engaged in the banking business there 
a short time, when his father, James Johnson, organized the Upland 
Bank and Noah Johnson became its cashier and remained so until his 
death, November 10, 1893. 

J. Noah Johnson married Bell Conley, who was born at Upland, 
and who died May 16, 1890. The Conleys were likewise a well known 
old family of Grant county. The children of Noah Johnson and wife 
were: Bertha, wife of Charles Snyder, whose sketch appears elsewhere 
in this work; Alva, engaged in the real estate business at Marion, and 
who has a family of two children; and Elva, a twin sister of Alva, 
and the wife of Charles F. Marley, whose individual sketch appears on 
other pages. Mrs. Marley was born on her grandfather's farm, April 
30, 1885, was well educated in Grant county schools, and through her 
grandfather's will has become the owner of five hundred and eighty 
acres of land. She was married February 8, 1909, to Charles F. Marley. 

B.iRziLL.\ B. Pancoast. The following paragraphs contain a brief 
outline of the family history and the varied career of one of the most 
venerable men of Jefferson township, where he has lived and prospered 
as a farmer for the past thirty years. Mr. Pancoast is now over eighty 
years of age, has always boime the reputation of being a hard-working, 
honest and upright citizen, and in his community enjoys the esteem 
of a large acquaintance. 

The Pancoast family is said to have been originally Swedish, and 
their early residence in New Jersey would bear out that assumption. 
The grandparents of the Jefferson township farmer spent all their lives 
in New Jersey, and so far as known practically all members of the dif- 
ferent generations have followed farming as a vocation. The father 
of Barzilla B. Pancoast was Henry Pancoast, born in Salem county, 
New Jersey, and died there in August, 1835. The other members of his 
family were: Edward, who was a farmer and lived in Salem county, 
was twice married, but had only one daughter, Sarah; William, who 
spent his life on a farm in Salem county. New Jersey, was married 
twice and had one son, Stacey ; Samuel, who lived and died on his farm 
in Salem county, was also twice married, had one son by his first wife, 
and a son and two daughters by the second; Sarah married Samuel 
Dickerson and her life also was spent in New Jersey. 

Henry Pancoast belonged to a family that adhered to Quaker doc- 
trines, and that was also his own religious faith. He was a Jackson 
Democrat, and all members of the Pancoast family have been strongly 
inclined in that way of political thinking. Heniy Pancoast was mar- 
ried in his native county to Hannah Hackney, who was born in Salem 



556 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

county in 1788, and came of English stock. After a long widowhood 
she died in New Jersey in 1878. She belonged to the Methodist church. 
Her five children are mentioned as follows : Mary, who in October, 
1913, was ninety-five years of age, and a resident of New Castle, Dela- 
ware ; she married Hiram Cook, by whom she had a family. Caroline 
died after her marriage to Isaac James, a machinist, and they had one 
son and a daughter. Rebecca married James Cook, a brother of Hiram 
Cook just mentioned, and they spent their lives in New Jersej', and of 
their children, two sons and three daughters are living. Edward, whose 
home is at Riverton, New Jersey, and who is seventy-eight years of age, 
and retired, had a very successful career as a contractor and builder, and 
by his marriage to a second cousin, Rebecca Hackney, he has one son 
and a daughter still living. 

Barzilia B. Paneoast was born at Woodstown, Salem county, New 
Jersey, May 23, 1831. When he was four years of age his father died, 
and he was then reared by his mother and his uncle Samuel until he 
was sixteen years of age. His education was somewhat limited, and 
acquired in the schools at Woodtown. His preparation for a practical 
career of usefulness in the world began at sixteen when he entered an 
apprenticeship to the blacksmith's trade, and at twenty had become 
a master workman and started out as a journeyman. He worked in 
Cincinnati and various places in Ohio ; also in Indiana and Tennessee, 
and finally went back to Ohio, and at Beavertown, Montgomery county, 
Ohio, where he was married, he established a smith and carried on a 
good business there and elsewhere until 1883. That was the year he 
came to Grant county. In the meantime, by his many years of hard 
work and by the thrifty habits which he had acquired early in life, he 
had enough money to buy eighty acres of land lying in sections eleven 
and twelve of Jefferson township, in Grant county. Since turning his 
attention to agriculture, Mr. Paneoast has seldom known a year w-hieh 
he could not call prosperous, and at the same time he developed and 
improved his land, until as a farm its equal is hard to find in this com- 
munity. All his land is in cultivation with the exception of five acres 
in timber. He has a comfortable dwelling, a big red barn, and has put 
up several other buildings for the home of his son. In December, 1857, 
in Beavertown, Montgomery county, Ohio, Mr. Paneoast married Sarah 
Bridgeman, who w^as bom there September 24, 1841, and reared and 
educated in that part of Ohio. She has been a devoted wife and an able 
helper to her husband for fifty-six years, and their married companion- 
ship has not only endured much beyond half a century, but each year 
has strengthened the bond of their afiiectiou. Mrs. Paneoast 's parents 
were Thomas and Esther (Johns) Bridgeman, her mother of Welsh 
stock, and her father born of Virginia parents. IMr. Bridgeman in his 
early day, when a young man, walked all the way from Harpers Ferry 
in Virginia to Montgomery county, Ohio, carrying his trusty rifle over 
his shoulder to protect himself from danger and also to shoot game on 
the way. He met Miss Sarah Johns in Montgomery county, where she 
was born, and after their marriage, they started life as fai-mers. She 
died, leaving two sons. He later mamed Esther, a sister of Sarah 
Johns. Mr. Bridgeman died in Montgomery county, in November, 
1882, when eighty-four years of age. and his wife passed away at about 
the same age. They were both members of the Christian church. 

The children of' Mr. and Mrs. Paneoast are: Leonidas, a blacksmith 
whose home is in Eaton, Indiana, and who has been three times married, 
having three daughters by his first wife, and one son by his second; 
Ella is the widow of William Runyon, and lives at Indianapolis ; Harry 
is a blacksmith at Eaton, and has a son and daughter ; Charles C. is a 
baker by trade, in business at Muncie, and has two sons and a daughter. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 557 

"Warren occupies and is the active manager of the old homestead, and 
bj^ his marriage to Bertha Thompson of Grant county has two daugh- 
ters, Hazel Feme, and Mildred Delight, both daughters being highly 
educated. Maggie died when twenty-two yeai-s of age, and there were 
four other children who died in infancy. ]Mr. and Mrs. Paneoast attend 
worship in the Methodist Protestant ehureh, in which he formerly served 
as trustee, and his son Warren is Smiday school superintendent. Mr. 
Paneoast and his sous are Republicans in politics, and his tirst vote was 
cast for John C. Fremont, who was the first standard bearer of the 
Republican party in 1856. 

James B. Strange. One of the oldest and most prominent families 
of Grant county is represented by James B. Strange, of ]\Ionroe township. 
He himself was born close to his present home, was reared and educated 
in his native environment, is a product of local schools, and since attain- 
ing manhood has been closely identified with farming and stock raising 
interests of the locality. As a stockman he is easily one of the most suc- 
cessful in Grant county. 

Near the little village of Arcana, in section 9, of ]\Ionroe township, 
is located the excellent homestead of ^Ir. Strange. He has four hundred 
and ten acres of land, most of it under cultivation, and including a fine 
tract of thirty acres in timber. In 1886 he erected on this place the 
comfortable dwelling of twelve rooms, where the family has since had 
their home, and about which all the family associations center. Aboiit 
three sides of this house is a concrete porch, a large lawn surrounds it, 
and an evergreen hedge with trees and flowers serves to beautify the home 
and increases its attractiveness. Jlr. Strange is a progressive farmer, 
who believes in housing his stock and machinery in the best fashion, and 
has a large red barn, and a concrete poultry house 11x90 feet. He and 
his wife are known all over the township for their success as poultry 
raisers, and they breed the Rhode Island Reds and the Blue Andalusians. 
Each year he raises about five hundred chickens, and from one 
hundred and twenty-five hens, his weekly output of eggs is fifty dozen. 
Some of his crops in 1912 show the extensive scale on which he does busi- 
ness. He raised four thousand bushels of corn from sixty-five acres of 
land, six hundred and sixtj- bushels of. oats, cut one hundred tons of hay, 
and sent out to market one hundred hogs. He also keeps a number of 
cattle and horses, raising the Durham cattle, 

James B. Strange was born on the old home place near the present 
farm, on June 24, 1857. He now o«nis this farm and his son, George 
Strange. Jr., lives there. His father was the late George Strange, who 
was born in 1820, and died October 28, 1910. The mother was Lydia 
Duckwall. Both parents were born in Ohio, and came to Grant county 
in 1842. The father entered eighty acres of land from the government, 
having farmed his place in the wilderness, and having spent many indus- 
trious j'ears in clearing off the trees and underbrush. At the time of his 
death, his vigorous ability had accumulated what amounted to a fortune, 
and in one place he owned an entire section of land. At one time he was 
the owner of more than one thousand acres in Monroe township. While 
he was still living, he divided his estate among his children, and provided 
liberally for his family, and did well his part as a factor in the local 
community. For fourteen successive years, with the exception of one 
year, he served as trustee of iloiiroe township. He was a Democrat, and 
was elected while the township was Republican, having carried it each 
time except once. He was affiliated with the IMasonic order. The mother 
died in February, 1911, at the age of ninety years. Their nine children, 
of whom five are living, were as follows : Absalom, who was killed by a 
horse at the age of twenty years ; Rose Anne, who died at the age of four- 



558 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

teen ; Anna, who died at the age of six months ; one who died in infancy ; 
Mrs. Margaret Roberts, of South Marion; Mrs. Kate Wall, of West 
Mai-ion; Joshua, of Marion; John T., of Marion; James B. 

James B. Strange as a boy attended the district school No. 2, and on 
finishing the common schools studied several terms at ilarion College. 
Before he reached his majority, he qualified and taught school, and then 
his father gave him a cleared tract of land of eighty acres, where he 
located and began his regular career as a farmer. As a result of his 
efforts, he has been investing his surplus in additional land, until at the 
present time he has one of the largest and best improved farms in this 
township. In 1911 Mr. Strange erected on the old home farm now 
occupied by his son George, Jr., a large barn 50x90 feet, and 24 feet high, 
the highest in the township. Mr. Strange is a Democrat in polities, and 
served as township trustee of ]kIonroe township from 1884 to 1889, having 
been reelected in 1886. He and his family worship in the ilarion Chris- 
tian church, and fraternally he is affiliated with Arcana Blue Lodge of 
Masonry, of Upland. 

In 1878 he married Miss Elizabeth Nelson, a daughter of Martin 
Nelson, one of the pioneers of Monroe township. They had five children, 
three of whom are still living, namely : George, Jr., who resides on the 
old home farm, which his grandfather entered, is married and has two 
children named Evaline and Genevieve; ilinnie, wife of LeRoy Tudor, 
of Monroe township, and the mother of one son,. Ray F.; Commodore, in 
the Texas oil fields ; Otto, deceased, and one that died in infancy. 

John Sanders. The quality of leadership and business enterprise 
has been distinctive of the career of John Sanders through many years 
in Grant county. Very recently Mr. Sanders left the farm enterprise 
to which he had devoted so many years and retired to a comfortable 
home in the little city of Matthews, where he and his good wife are en- 
joying the comfort and peace so well won by their past life. Mr. Sanders 
in everj'thing he has undertaken has shown himself vigorous, efficient, 
and public spirited. He is well remembered as one of the former 
sheriffs of Grant county, and has been prominent both in township and 
county affairs. 

John Sanders was born in Grant county, March 13, 1845, and this 
is one of the oldest of Grant county's pioneer names. His birthplace 
was in the township of Jefferson on his father's old homestead at New 
Cumberland. His father, William Sanders, was born in Ohio, Septem- 
ber 19, 1809, and was a son of Robert Sanders, whose birth occurred in 
Culpeper county, Virginia, about 1768. Robert Sanders was a soldier 
and one of the devoted followers of General Anthony Wayne, and par- 
ticipated in the campaigns on the northwest side of the Ohio River 
against the Indians, following the Revolutionary war, fighting at Port 
Wayne and also at Fort Recovery, and was on the St. Mary's River. 
Robert Sanders, who came of English ancestry, married Sarah Mc- 
Cormick, a Virginia girl, and to their union were born the following 
children: John, Catherine, Mary, William, Amelia, Lavina, Colman, 
Abner, James, Joseph and Nancy — eleven in all. All of these grew up 
and were married and had children of their own and most of them lived 
to be threescore years or more in age. One attained the venerable age 
of ninety-three. The entire family of children came to the state of 
Indiana during the decade of the twenties, and lived and died in this 
state. Robert Sanders moved from Virginia to Ohio about 1800, estab- 
lished a home and developed a portion of the wilderness at that state 
and some of his children were born there. About 1820 he moved to 
Fayette county, Indiana, living near Connersville until 1826, and in that 
year became one of the first who ventured into the wilderness of Dela- 



BLACKFORD AND GKANT COUNTIES 55& 

ware county, entering land in what is now Washington township. Just 
two .years later, in 1828, Robert Sanders moved across into Grant county, 
and here again was a pioneer. His name is thus to be found among the 
list of pioneers in three Indiana counties. In Grant county, he entered 
government land along the Mississinewa river in Jefferson township. 
The entire township was then a wilderness, most of it covered with dense 
timbers, and his was one of the first cabins and first establishments in 
that section. A distinction which will always attach to the name of 
Robert Sanders is that in 1833 he platted and laid out on his land a 
town to which he gave the name New Cumberland, and selling a number 
of lots, started a village which has had a long history, and which under 
modem conditions has become somewhat submerged under the new vil- 
lage of Matthews, and is now designated as Old Town. In that vicinity 
Robert Sanders lived and labored, reared a family of children, and used 
his influence toward building up a community in which he was the lead- 
ing spirit. He died at his son William's home in 1861, at the age of 
ninet.y-three years. He was an old-line Whig, and later joined the 
Republican party which was organized only a few years before his 
death. His wife passed away about twenty years before his death, and 
was about seventy years old. They were both members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

William Sanders was only a boy when his parents came to Indiana, 
and was seventeen years old at the time the home was established in 
Jefferson township of Grant county. There the time passed until he 
became of age, and in 1834 he made his first important venture inde- 
pendently by entering one hundred and thirty-two acres of government 
land in section two of Jefferson township. During his younger and 
more active career, William Sanders was known as a hard worker and 
an expert in handling the ax and cradle, and could follow the plow up 
and down the fields all day long. He cleared away much of the timber 
from his land, and was always known as a man of substantial pros- 
perity and influence. He lived and died on his farm in Jefferson town- 
ship, passing away February 17, 1879. In April, 1837, he was married 
to Rachel Wharton, who was born either in Ohio or Pennsylvania, April 
2, 1812, a daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Gray) Wharton, the former 
a native of Maryland and the latter of New Jersey. The Wharton 
family is likewise an old name in Grant county, and Thomas Wharton 
entered land in Jefferson township when the greater part of its area 
was a wilderness. The Whartons were Methodists in religion. Mrs. 
William Sanders died at her home in Jefferson township in January, 
1893. She and her husband belonged to the Methodist church, and in 
politics he was a strong Republican. Their children are: Nancy J., 
the widow of David Collins, and living at New Cumberland, at the age 
of seventy-seven; Sarah, who is the wife of James H. Wills, a farmer 
in Delaware county, and they have three children, and John Sanders 
of this review. 

Mr. John Sanders grew up in the pioneer times of Jeffereon town- 
ship, had a common school education, and was about sixteen years old 
when the war broke out between the north and south. A year later, 
when seventeen /ears old, he enlisted in Company B of the Eighty- 
Fourth Indiana V'olunteers, and made a record as an efficient and faith- 
fid soldier in the various campaigns until the close of the war. The 
date of his enlistment was August 11, 1862, and his honorable dis- 
charge came on May 29, 1865. He was in the army under General 
Rosecrans and other noted Union leaders, and most of his active service 
was in the canr.paigns of the middle west, including the battle of Chicka- 
mauga and ottiers in Tennessee and Georgia. 

At Rocky Face Ridge he was wounded by a minie ball through. 



560 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

the left foot. He was in the company commanded by Captain John H. 
Ellis, who wds kiUed at Chickamauga and his son Franklin Ellis was 
promoted to captain, and he is now judge of the circuit court in Dela- 
ware county. The colonel of the regiment was Nelson Trusler. Mr. 
Sanders on returning home took up his work as a farmer, and has since 
become one of the most successful in that business in Jefferson town- 
ship. His home place comprises eight.y acres of laud in section thirty- 
two and its improvements and buildings, fences and cultivation mark it 
as one of the best estates in this vicinity. Recently Mr. Sanders and 
wife retired from their farm and are now residing in a comfortable 
seven-room dwelling in Matthews. Mr. Sanders also owns a fine farm 
near Old Town in section two, that being one hundred and twenty-six 
acres of his father's old homestead. As a farmer Mr. Sanders showed 
himseK both practical and scientific, he always did mixed farming, 
raising both grain and live stock, did much to maintain the fertility 
of his soil, and iu business as in civic affairs has always been a hustler, 
and a leader. 

In 1890 Mr. Sanders was elected on the Republican ticket as sheriff 
and served one term until 1892. Two terms have been given to the 
ofiice of township trustee, and wherever placed by his feUow citizens, 
his work has been commendable and beneficiah Fraternally he has 
been an active member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows since 
1871, in both the subordinate Lodge No. 383, and in the Encampment 
No. 125, and also the Rebekah Lodge No. 447. He is a past noble grand 
in the lodge, and is past commander of the B. R. Dunn Post, No. 440, of 
the Grand Army of the Republic, formerly located at New Cumberland, 
that village being now merged into the village of Matthews. 

In Blackford county on October 13, 1866, Mr. Sanders married 
Mary J. Reasoner, of an old and prominent family in Delaware county. 
She was born in Delaware county, in Washington to\\-nship, October 
27, 1848, and at the age of twelve years was taken by her parents to 
Blackford county. She is a daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Dunn) 
Reasoner, who were born in Pennsylvania, but were married in Dela- 
ware county, and were farmers and good citizens. Mr. Reasoner was 
more than eighty years of age when he died and his wife lived to be 
about seventy. They were Presbyterians, and he was a Republican 
in politics. Jacob Reasoner was a son of Benjamin aud ilary (HiU) 
Reasoner, of Pennsylvania birth and of Scotch ancestry. The Rea- 
soners came to Delaware county in time to enter land from the govern- 
ment, and later moved into Blackford county, where they died old 
people and highly respected members of theii' community. The faith 
of the Presbyterian church they zealously maintained themselves, and 
were leaders in the extension of that religion in their various communi- 
ties. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sanders are the parents of three living children: 
Geneva S. is the wife of Walter L. Gay, of Fairmount, and they have 
two children, Mary L. and Morris L. ; William Frederick is now active 
manager of his father's farm, and married Gertrude Landis; Berniee 
R. is the wife of Leo Clyde Gossett, living in Van Buren, Grant county, 
and their children are Frederick C. and Martha. Mr. and Mrs. Sanders 
are members of the Presbyterian church. 

Charles H. Sntdee. One of the largest and best farming estates 
in Jefferson township is that of Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Snyder whose 
home is in section five. Mr. Snyder is one of the progressive young 
agriculturists, a man of great energy, a hard-worker, aud is giving 
excellent account of himself in his chosen vocation. Their home place 
consists of one hundred and sixty acres, improved with a commodious 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 561 

white house of ten rooms, and a large red barn standing on a founda- 
tion one hundred by forty-two feet. 'Sir. and Mrs. Snyder own other 
lands and the aggregate of their possessions amounts to five hundred 
and eighty acres. It is divided into four different farms, and each has 
excellent improvements, including two full sets of farm buildings. The 
crops are corn, wheat and oats, and practically every pound of grain 
produced on the land is fed to livestock, and in that way the fertility 
of the soil is kept up to the highest point. 

Mr. Charles H. Snyder was bom in Hocking county, Ohio, January 
26, 1878, was reared and educated there, and his parents were Jacob 
and Catherine (Eckstein) Snyder. They were also natives of Ohio, 
and of German stock. They were married in Hocking county, and 
began life on a farm in Laurel township of that county, where they 
spent the rest of. their years. His father died in 1897 when sixty-five 
years old, and his mother was about fifty-two when her death occurred. 
They were good Christian people, substantial farmers, good neighbors, 
and his father was a Democrat in politics. Their six children are men- 
tioned as follows: Mary, is the wife of Jacob Lyghtle, a farmer in 
Monroe township of Grant county, and of their four children the only 
son died, leaving three daughters still living; Eliza is the wife of David 
Llama of Hocking county, Ohio, where he is a farmer, and they have 
six children; Flora is the wife of John D. Llama, a farmer in Marion 
county, Ohio, and they have a family; Kirk G. is a farmer in Michigan 
and has a wife and children. The next is Charles H. ; Ira lives with 
his sister, Mrs. Lyghtle, in Grant county. 

Mr. Snyder came to Grant county because his sister lived here, and 
he had his home with her for several years. In 1898 he married Miss 
Bertha Johnson, who was born and reared and educated in Jefferson 
township, and belongs to the Johnson family which has been identified 
with Grant county as early settlers and among the largest land owners 
since pioneer times. She is a great-granddaughter of John Johnson, 
who spent most of his life in Guernsey county, Ohio, but in 1835 came to 
Indiana on horseback and entered and bought a tract of land in section 
eight of Jefferson township, and also laud in Delaware county. His 
son James Johnson some years later came out to Grant county and took 
possession of the quarter section in Jefferson township, settled down to 
farming on a large scale, was a business man of exceptional energy and 
foresight, and eventually was regarded as the largest land owner in 
Grant county, possessing twenty-seven hundred acres, lying chiefl.y within 
the limits of this county. He died only a few years ago on the old home- 
stead. Noah Johnson, a son of James and father of jMi-s. Snyder, was 
born on the Jefferson township farm, and died in Upland in 1893 when 
in middle life. He was cashier of the Upland Bank at the time of his 
death. His wife was Bell Conley, who was born at Upland and died 
May 16, 1890, on the old farm. They were the parents of three chil- 
di-en : Elva and Alva, twins, the former being the wife of Charles F. 
Marley, and moi-e details concerning the Johnson family will be found 
in a sketch under his name elsewhere in this publication, while Alva is 
a well known real estate man in Marion. Bertha Johnson, the oldest of 
these children, was born on the old family estate in 1883. was reared 
and educated here and at her grandfather's death inherited a large 
amount of his land. Mr. and Mrs. Snyder have two children : Clarence 
Alva, fourteen years of age, and now in the second year of the Upland 
high school; and Harry Clyde, aged twelve and in the graded schools. 
Mr. and ]\[rs. Snyder attend the New Light Christian church in Jeffer- 
son township, and in politics Mr. Snyder votes the Democratic ticket. 



562 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Francis Marion Wyckoff. The attractive homestead of Frauds 
M. Wyckoff is in section eleven of Jefferson township. Mr. Wyckoff 
came in young manhood to Grant county, possessed the qualities and 
training which make the successful farmer, and by concentrating his 
efforts along one line through a succession of years has accumulated 
more than the average prosperity, and at the same time has won a high 
place of esteem in his neighborhood. 

Concerning his family, it should be said that his grandfather Nicholas 
Wyckoff was of German parentage, and was probably born in Kentucky, 
in which state he was married. All the children by his first marriage 
were born in Kentucky, including Henry, Abraham, Margaret, Susan, 
and William. Somewhat later the family moved to Indiana, and located 
west of the west fork of White River in Union township of Bartholomew 
county. There Nicholas Wyckoff bought two hundred acres of partly 
improved laud, and before his death had the satisfaction of owning a 
fine property. He was past sixty when he died, and after the death 
of his first wife he married a Mrs. Tucker, who by that marriage had 
three daughters, and by her union to Michael Tucker had one daughter. 

Henry Wyckoff, father of Francis M., was born in Kentucky in 1823, 
and died in Bartholomew county, Indiana, in 1868. His vocation was 
that of farming, his politics was Democratic, and he was a member and 
supported the church. In Johnson county, Indiana, he married Mar- 
garet Boucher, who was born in Indiana about 1832 and was of a pioneer 
family in Johnson county. Her death occurred in April, 1883. Her 
parents were natives of Germany. The children of Henry Wyckoff and 
wife were John W., who is unmarried and lives in Michigan; Susan, who 
died unmarried; Thomas H., who was born in Union township, Bartholo- 
mew county, where he is now a successful farmer, and has six sons and 
one daughter ; James N., who died in young manhood ; Francis M. ; 
Sarah, wife of Simon Stucker, who lives in Louisville, Kentucky ; George, 
who died young; Martha, wife of Fred Mitler, of Louisville, Kentucky, 
and they have one son; and Edward, a farmer in Monroe township of 
Grant county, and the father of four children. 

Francis ilarion Wyckoff' was liorn in Union township, Bartholomew 
county, Indiana, April 12, 1850, was educated there, grew up on a farm, 
had a practical training in its management, and on coming to Grant 
county bought some land in Fairmount township. That township was 
his home for fourteen years, and on leaving there be bought ninety-two 
acres in section eleven of Jefferson township. His place is considered 
one of the very best tracts of country real estate in that vicinity, and 
he has managed it in a manner worthy of its real value. His permanent 
improvements include a big red barn, a comfortable eight-room white 
house, his crops are fed to his stock on the place, and he is a man who 
believes in keeping only the better grades of live stock, runs a little 
dairy, and makes a good deal of butter, which is one of the sources of his 
annual revenue. 

Mr. Wyckoff was married in Grant county to Mary E. Monroe, who 
was born in this county forty-five years ago, being reared and educated 
in her native vicinity. Her parents were Jesse and Catherine (Hineline) 
Monroe. Her father, who died in Jefferson township in middle life, 
was a son of Joseph Monroe, a pioneer settler who entered land from 
the government and gave many yeare of his life to its improvement. 
Part of the land he entered is now occupied in the farm of Francis M. 
Wyckoff. Mrs. Jesse Monroe is still living, being past seventy years of 
age, and her home is with her daughter Ada Marine at the old Monroe 
farm in Jefferson township. The children of ]\Ir. and Mrs. Wyckoff 
are: Arthur J., who is employed at Marion, and by his marriage to 
Marie Draper, has one son, Richard H. ; Bertha A. was educated in the 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 563 

high school and Fairmount Academy and lives at home; and Gertrude 
May was also educated in the high school and is the wife of Roscoe San- 
born of Upland. 

Frank H. Kirkwood. The year 1832 is the first date at which the 
Kirkwood family became identified with Grant county. For fully eighty 
years, covering practically the entire period of the history of civilization 
in this section of the state, the name has been identified with the pioneer 
and modern activities in farming, business and public and social and 
religious affairs in this county and in Delaware county, as well as in 
other adjacent counties of Indiana. The immediate family of Frank 
H. Kirkwood was introduced to Grant county a short time before the 
Civil war and ilr. Frank H. Kirkwood has spent practically all his life 
in the county, and for many years has been one of the prosperous farmer 
citizens of Fairmount township, his home being on section 27 of that 
township. The family record is one of siich importance in different sec- 
tions of the state, that it is appropriate that extended mention be made of 
its earlier generations. The following paragraphs are the substance of a 
family sketch prepared by Mr. L. A. Kirkwood of Mnneie, for Frank H. 
Kirkwood, and ^vt-itten under date of September 20, 1909. This sketch 
covers the different generations quite fully, up to that in which Mr. Frank 
H. Kirkwood belongs. 

The name Kirkwood is Scotch and signifies a ' ' church in the woods, ' ' 
or a "wooden church." The late Samuel J. Kirkwood, who was governor 
of Iowa during the Civil war, and later secretary of the interior in the 
cabinet of President Garfield, once wrote in reply to some inquiries from 
Mr. L. A. Kirkwood, that his ancestors were natives of the north of 
Ireland, and were commonly called "Scotch-Irish or Presbyterian Irish, 
Presbyterianism being as natural to them as water to a duck." Daniel 
Kirkwood, for many years professor of mathematics in the Indiana State 
University at Bloomington, and an astronomer of note in both Europe 
and America, was a cousin to the Iowa statesman. He, too, was of Scotch- 
Irish origin with the usual pronounced Presliyterian religious faith so 
peculiar to the earlier generations of the family. In a letter written by 
him in 1871, he expressed the belief that his ancestors and those of the 
Indiana family were of the same family in the north of Ireland. 

The earliest known ancestors of the Kirkwood branch as related to the 
well known McCormick family, of Eastern Indiana, were from Knock- 
narney, County Down, Ireland, namel.y: James Reed Kirkwood and his 
wife, whose maiden name was Margaret Stewart. James Reed Kirkwood 
was born May 10, 1763, and Jlargaret Stewart on March 15, 1765. The 
exact date of their marriage is not known, but probabh^ occurred about 
the year 1784, their first child being born October 11, 1785. In their 
old bible, printed in Belfast, Ireland, in 1764, on a blank page, plainly 
written and in a fine state of preservation, is found this inscription, 
penned there more than one hundred years ago: 

"James Kirkwood is my name 

And Ireland is my nation, 

Knocknarney my dwelling place, 

And Heaven my habitation." 

"His hand wrote 

May sixth, 

1785." 

James Reed Kirkwood and wife reared a family of several children of 
record as follows: Martha Kirkwood, born October 11, 1785, in Ireland; 
Mary Kirkwood, born June 9, 1786, on the Atlantic ocean ; Annie Kirk- 



564 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

wood, born July 26, 179] ; William Nesbit Kirkwood, born January 19, 
1794; Thomas Kirkwood, born November 18, 1796; James Stewart, born 
September 23, 1801 ; Margaret Kirkwood, born October 4, 1803 — all the 
last five having Mifflin county, Penns.vlvania, as their birthplace. There 
is nothing of record to show when these parents fii'st left the shores of 
Ireland or of their landing on American soil, save that it was in the 
summer of the year 1778. It would seem that they located in Mifflin 
county, Pennsylvania, where they continued to reside imtil some time 
subsequent to October, 1803. Of the children just mentioned, Martha 
married William Starkey; Mary married John Gillaud; Annie married 
James Gilland; William Nesbit married Matilda Randall; Thomas 
married Jane MeCormick and James Stewart married Catherine 
McCormick. 

James Reed Kirkwood passed away jNIay 10. 1836, his wife having 
preceded him September 25, 1835. At the time of their death they made 
their home with their youngest son, James S. Kirkwood in Posey town- 
ship, Fayette county, Indiana. Their earthly remains are in a neglected 
pioneer graveyard about one-fourtli of a mile north of Bentonville, 
Fayette county. It has long since been utterly abandoned as a burial 
place and is part of an open field used for farming. There are now 
no signs whatever of a cemetery there, save the two base-stones, from 
which the marble slabs have been broken off and removed to the fence 
which encloses the field. These were the only graves with stone markers 
in this early pioneer burial place, and not a sign of other graves therein 
is visible. 

The Kirkwood relationship with the McCormick family began with 
the marriage of Thomas Kirtn^ood and Jane McCormick, which event 
took place March 4, 1824, at the old McCormick homestead near Con- 
nersville, Fa.yette county. They settled on land in Posey township in 
that county, living the life of the settlers of that early time in Indiana. 
They remained in Fayette county, until 1832, when they moved to 
Grant county, and located on a farm, near where the town of Mathews 
now stands. In about the year 1850 they removed to a farm near 
Eaton, in Union township of Delaware county, on the west bank of the 
]\Iississinewa River, remaining there the rest of their days. They had 
fourteen children, the first five born in Fayette county and the other 
nine in Grant county, their names with dates of birth being as follows : 
William Nesbit, December 9, 1824; Joseph Stewart, October 12, 1826; 
James Lewis, January 17, 1828; John Reed, July 20, 1829; Elizabeth 
Margaret' March 18, 1831; Samuel Drennan, October 2, 1832; Sarah 
Catherine, April 26, 1834; Thomas Cousins, April 27, 1836; Amos 
Washington, May 15. 1838; David McCormick, May 20, 1840; a son 
stillborn, October 10, 1841; Robert Lewis. IMay 25. 1843; Mary Jane, 
March 4, 1846; and ilartha Ann, November 24, 1848. Thomas Kirk- 
wood, father of these children, died October 2, 1851, aged fifty-four 
years, ten months and fourteen days. His ^vidow, Jane Kirkwood, sur- 
vived him forty-five years, passing away April 30, 1896, aged ninety- 
three years, eleven months and four days. Their remains rest in Mount 
Zion cemetery. Union township, Delaware county. 

The further relationship of the Kirkwoods and the McCormicks took 
place June 24, 1825, when James Stewart Kirk^vood, a brother to Thomas, 
was united in marriage with Catherine IMcCormick, a sister to Jane. 
This event, like the other, was celebrated at the old McCormick home- 
stead near Connersville. in Fayette county. They also settled on land 
in Posey township, adjoining that of Thomas Kirkwood and John Gil- 
land. Thev also had born to them a family of fourteen children, of rec- 
ord as follows: John Drennen. born October 9. 1826; James Reed, 
October 24, 1828; William Morrison. June 24, 1830; Thomas Boston, 




JOHN D. KIRKWOOD 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 565 

August 18, 1832; Mary Jane. July 21, 1834; David McCormick, Novem- 
ber 12, 1836 : Joseph Lewis. December 22, 1838 ; Jefferson Stewart, May 
23, 1841; Elizabeth Ann, ilarch 3. 1843; Margaret, May 10, 1845; 
Leviugston Alexander, February 11, 1847; Savannah Caroline, Decem- 
ber 25, 1849; Amanda Samira, March 1, 1851; Almyra Frances Helen, 
January 30, 1854. 

James Stewart Kirkwood, father of the last mentioned children, 
continued on the same farm until the time of his death, October 9, 1860, 
aged fifty -nine years and sixteen days. His widow, Catherine (McCor- 
mick) Kirkwood, survived him forty years, passing away July 11, 1900, 
aged ninety-one years, six months and twenty-five days. In 1874, Cathe- 
rine Kirkwood moved from Fayette county to Muncie, Indiana, where 
she spent the remaining twenty-six years of her life. Their remains 
rest in the cemetery one-half mile south of Bentouville in Fayette county. 
Of the fourteen children above named, the following had passed away 
at the time ]\Ir. L. A. Kii-kwood wrote in September, 1909 : j\larj^ Jane, 
wife of Lexemuel Beeson, June 8, 1853 ; Almira Frances Helen Kirk- 
wood, August 26, 1860 ; James Reed Kirkwood, November 16, 1903 ; and 
John Dreunen Kirkwood, ilay 6, 1905. 

Coming to the immediate family of Frank H. Kirkwood, some addi- 
tional facts may be stated concerning his father, John Drennen Kirk- 
wood, mentioned in the family last named, and who died in 1905 near 
Matthews, in Grant county. Reared in Fayette county, he became a 
skilled workman as a carpenter and builder, a trade he followed for a 
number of years. In 1859, he settled in Grant county, where he bought 
some land near jMatthews. He had mai'ried a widow with two daughters, 
and on the removal to Grant county he bought eighty acres for each of 
these daughters. Then by his active management ancl ability he secured 
two hundred and forty acres for himself in Jefferson township. Thus 
practically all his attention after he came to Grant county was given to 
agriculture, and in his time he was known as one of the most successful 
men in Jefferson township. In politics, like the majority of the Kirk- 
woods, he was a Democrat. Though he and his wife held to no church, 
he was in every sense a Christian. John D. Kirkwood was married in 
Fayette county to Mrs. Ruth Burgess whose maiden name was Crawford. 
She was born in Fayette county in 1824, and died in Jefferson township 
of Grant county, December 16, 1902. By her first marriage to Isi'ael 
Burgess there were two daughters. Margaret and Sarah (Sallie). Mar- 
garet is the widow of William ^lillspaugh, of Delaware county, Indiaua, 
and has a family ; Sarah married Leander ilillspaugh, a farmer in Jef- 
ferson township, and they have a family of children. To the marriage 
of John Drennen Kirkwood and Mrs. Burgess were born two children: 
Brooks, born in 1868, and died Setember 23, 1906, married Bell Corn, 
who now lives at ]\Iuncie and has a son ilarcus.* 

Mr. Frank H. Kirkwood, the older of the two sons of John Drennen 
Kirkwood, was born July 2, 1858, in Fayette county, Indiana, and since 
1859 his home has been in Grant county. His early education was 
unusually good for the time, and all his active career has been devoted 
to farming. His is one of the fine rural estates in Jefferson township, 
comprising one hundred and twenty-five acres of first-class land, with 
about one hundred acres in cultivation, and in a high state of improve- 
ment. He is the owner also of another tract, consisting of eighty acres. 
That is in section thirty-six of Fairmount township. His home is on 
section thirty-seven, and the improvements about the place indicate his 
progi-essive character as a leading Grant county farmer. A well fur- 
nished and attractive residence, nieel.y painted white and of one and a 
half storj', is the prominent feature, while a large basement barn, forty 
by one hundred feet, is another valuable improvement. Mr. Kirkwood 



566 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

believes in the rotation of crops, and has had much success in growing the 
staple cereals, corn, wheat, oats and clover. In order to preserve the 
fertility of his soil and keep all his grain crops at home, he raises hogs, 
and cattle, and feeds practically aU his gi-ain on his own land. 

Mr. Earkwood was first married in Grant county to Jlollie Richards, 
a daughter of L. G. Richards. She was born and reared in Jefferson 
township, and at her death left a daughter Florence. Florence is the 
\nie of Lewis Johnson of Matthews, in Grant county, and their children 
are Arthur B., Twila, and Ruby E. The second wife of Mr. Kirk- 
wood was Nettie M. Jones, who died while giving birth to twins, who 
did not survive their mother. The present Mrs. Kirkwood was before 
her marriage, Lydia D. Oliver, a daughter of Edward and Elizabeth 
(Lugar) Oliver. Mrs. Kirkwood was born in Mills townsliip, where she 
was reared and educated. Her father Edward Oliver, still lives on the 
old homestead at the age of seventj'-two. He was born in Ohio. His 
wife Elizabeth, died in Mill township January 24, 1904, and was a 
native of ilills township, where she spent all her life, her parents having 
been among the pioneers in Grant county. Mr. Oliver is a Democrat, 
and he and his wife had no church aiSliations. 

ilr. Frank H. Kirkwood and his present wife are the parents of four 
children: Walter E.. born July 22, 1891, educated in Fowlerton and now 
manager of one of his father's farms, married Vedah P. Thom, and they 
have one son, Hubert Drennen, aged two years; Chester J., born January 
12, 1895, educated in the Fowlerton public schools and the Fairmount 
high school and lives at home ; Orin B., born April 6, 1897, is attending 
school ; Russell A., born July 28, 1899, is also in school. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kirfc^vood are members of the United Brethren church 
of Fowlerton, and in politics he is a Democrat. 

William Paul Stover. On section twenty-five of Jefferson to-wn- 
ship is the Stover homestead, a farm under the management of that 
family for upwards of forty years, the present proprietor being William 
Paul Stover, a young and progressive agriculturist, who succeeded liis 
father in the management of the estate, and has the reputation in the 
neighborhood of being a "live wire" and in ever}' way a most pro- 
gressive citizen. He has a beautiful home, farm buildings much above 
the average of even Grant county and has a large acreage of regular 
farm crops and raises a number of high grade cattle and hogs and other 
live stock. 

His grandfather, William David Stover, was born in Virginia, and of 
Virginia parentage, though of German ancestry. He married a Miss 
Bushyoung, born in Virginia, and of the same lineage as her husband. 
Before they came west, all of their five children were born. They are 
as follows:" John and Catherine, both of whom married and had chil- 
dren, and both now deceased; Mary, who died in the spring of 1912, 
and left children ; Samuel G. ; David, the youngest of the family, who 
is now a farmer in Blackford county, and has a family of five daughters. 
Samuel G. Stover, father of W. P. Stover, was born in Roanoke 
county, Virginia, on Christmas Day of 1843. When he was seventeen 
years old his parents came to Indiana, and in 1861 settled in Henry 
county. Both his parents died in Henry county, his father when past 
eighty years of age and his mother some twenty years before. They 
were" substantial farming people, and devout members of the United 
Brethren church. Samuel G. Stover after he became of age took up 
his independent career in Delaware county, where he met and married 
Miss M. Emma Shirey, who was born in this state. After four or five 
years on a Delaware county farm, they came in 1876 to Grant county 
and bought one hundred and sixty acres in section twenty -five of Jeffer- 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 567 

sou township. Later their euterprise aud careful mauagemeiit enabled 
them to increase their acreage by the purchase of eight}' acres more, 
and there Samuel Stover labored and lived out the useful years of his 
existence until his death on March 1, 1912. He had his farm well 
improved, and in every direction on the old homestead can still be seen 
the evidence of his thrift and diligence. His wife died on the same farm, 
July 28, 1909. She was born in Virginia in 1845, aud when twelve years 
of age accompanied her parents to Delaware county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel G. Stover were active in the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, aud he was a Rei^ublican in politics. Their children were : 
Cora, who died at the age of six mouths; one that died in infancy; 
Marion, who also died in infancy ; Florence, wife of William J. Williams, 
a farmer in Blackford county, and they had two childi'en, Samuel M. 
and Robert Paul; Pearl, who died February 3, 1910, at the age of 
twenty-four, was unmarried, aud was a graduate of the University of 
Indiana at Bloomington; William Paul Stover, the youngest of the chil- 
dren, was born on the home farm iu Jefferson township, February 9, 
1890. Though ouly a few years past his majority lie has already made 
a record of accomplishment such as many older men would envy. With 
the class of 1908 he graduated from the Upland high school, aud has 
since been attending strictly to business as a farmer. Since coming 
into possession of the estate he has erected one of the finest barns iu 
Jeffersou township, a large and commodious structure of modern style 
as to sanitation and convenience, and built on ground dimensions of 
seventy by thirty-six feet, with a cow baru sixteen by fifty feet. A 
comfortable old farm residence was erected by his father twenty-seven 
years ago, and still affords the comforts of a good home. 

Mr. Stover was married in Grant county in 1912 to Miss Nettie 
Roberds, who was born iu Blackford county. May 1, 1886, aud was 
educated iu the public schools. Her parents were Joseph A. and Anna 
Eliza (Wilson) Roberds. Anna Eliza Wilson was a daughter of Closes 
Wilsou. The Roberds family live on a farm in Licking township of 
Blackford county, aud are prosperous aud well to do people. Mr. and 
Mrs. Stover have no children, and are popular among the younger 
members of Jeffei-son township in social circles. They attend the 
Pleasant Grove Methodist church. 

Alvin Dickerson. No other merchant or business man now operat- 
ing in Upland was in business there when Alviu Dickerson started, and 
he is not only the oldest established merchant, but foremost iu everything 
that concerns the advancement and prosperity of that flourishing little 
community. With good natural endowments, he has had a thorough 
training, aud his success in business is based upon the solid foundation 
of accomplishment and experience. 

Alvin Dickerson was born in Delaware county, Indiana, on a farm, 
January 17, 1865, and belongs to oue of the old families of eastern 
Indiana. His grandfather, Richard Dickerson, came from Ohio to 
Indiana in the year 1836 and entered laud direct from the government 
in Washiugtou township of Delaware county. In order to pay his fees 
and take out his patent, he had to go to the Fort Wayne land office. On 
the land thus acquired he lived and labored until he had made an excel- 
lent home, his estate comprising eighty acres, and he was one of the 
interesting early settlers of that communitj'. When not following his 
regular vocation as a farmer, during the early years he did a great 
<ieal of teaming for Cincinnati merchants, hauling merchandise from the 
Ohio city to ditferent points in ea.stern Indiana. That was of course 
years before the first railroad was built into this section, aud the Over- 
land trail from Cincinnati northwest was the most frequented highway 



568 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

of transportation and nearly eveiy merchant got his goods by that route, 
and the farmers sent their produce to market largely the same May. 
Richard Dickersou died before the Civil war and was fifty-six years 
of age at the time. During his residence iu Ohio he married a iliss 
Hart and she died in Delaware county about the same time as her hus- 
band and about the same age. They became the pai-euts of three sons 
and six daughters. The only one now living is R. Huston, living in 
Fowlerton, Grant comity. Another son was Joshua. John Dickerson, 
father of the Upland merchant, was born iu Guernsey county, Ohio, 
June 26, 1831, and died August 28, 1913, when past eighty-two years of 
age. His death occurred at Upland. On the old homestead iu Dela- 
ware county he spent his youth and when ready to make his first 
independent venture bought forty acres of wild laud in the same 
vicinity. That continued to be his home until the fall of 1865, when 
he moved over into Grant count.y, and bought one hundred acres iu 
section six of Jefllersou township. After many yeai-s of prosperous 
farming activity, he moved iu 1900 to Upland, which village remained 
his home until his death. His widow still lives in the village. Her 
maiden name was ilary Hollis, and she was born in Jefferson township 
in 1838, a daughter of William Hollis, who came from his native Ohio 
to Grant county and entered laud in Jeffersou township, getting his 
patent with the signature of Martin Van Buren, then president of the 
United States. There he lived amid the changing scenes which marked 
the progress of the country from pioneer stage into the modern times, 
and died ou the land which his labors had converted into a productive 
farm, at the age of seventy-eight years. He was three times married, 
and Jlrs. John Dickerson was the child of his first wife. John Dickereon 
voted the Democratic ticket, and he and his wife had no church afiilia- 
tions. Of their five children, four were daughters, and three of them 
are married and living in Grant county with families of their own. 
One daughter, Luna, is very successful as a teacher, and has for several 
years filled a responsible position in the government educational system 
in the Philippine Islands. 

Alvin Dickersou grew up in Grant county, attended the district 
schools of his neighborhood, and later was sent to the State Normal 
where he studied and qualified himself for the work of teaching which 
was his reg-ular occupation for eight years. His first school he taught 
at the age of nineteen. In January, 1892, ]\Ir. Dickerson came to 
Upland and contributed his resources of capital and enterprise to the 
little community then existing there. From the start on a modest scale 
he has been inci-easingly successful and his large general store is now 
located iu the center of the village on Main Street and supplies evei-y- 
thing needed by the people of this locality. Mr. Dickerson also owns 
a comfortable home in the village and a farm of thirty-two acres in 
Jefferson township. 

Mr. Dickerson is a Prohibition voter in political affairs. He was 
married in his home township to Miss Jennie "Walker, who was born and 
reared and educated in Jefferson township, a daughter of William C. 
and Sarah Walker, eouceruing whom further information will be found 
elsewhere in this volume. Mrs. Dickerson was for several years pre- 
ceding her marriage a successful and popular teacher in Grant County. 
To their marriage have been born two children : Cloyd, now twenty years 
of age, in his freshman year at Purdue University; Geneva, aged 
nineteen, graduated in the same class with her brother from the high 
school in 1912, and now lives at home and is a student of music. Mr. 
and Mrs. Dickerson have membership in the Presbyterian chui-ch. 

EzEKiEL Jones. The first carload of ice and the first carload of coal 
that came to Upland for distribution and use in the community wore 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 569 

shipped to Ezekiel Jones. The shipment of ice was made on August 
1, 1900, and the lirst car of coal came to him in January, 1903. Mr. 
Jones records those facts as important points in his commercial history, 
and from a beginning when a car of coal meant a very large transaction 
to him and also to the community he has developed both lines of business 
for summer and winter, until at the present time he handles annually 
about forty carloads of coal and some twelve carloads of ice. The business 
has been built up on a basis of fair dealing, and courteous and reliable 
treatment of his customers. 

Ezeldel Jones was born in Wells county, Indiana, September 15, 
18-47, but has lived in Grant county since early boyhood. His parents 
were Oliver and Catherine (Miller) Jones. The father was born in 
Ohio and the mother in Virginia, and both went to Wells county early 
in life, where they met and were married. Grandfather Daniel Jones 
was the founder of the family in Indiana, entering laud on Salmonia 
River in Wells countj' during the thirties and with the aid of his older 
sous he went vigorously to work and cleared up a wilderness and con- 
verted it into a productive farmstead, ilr. Jones spent all the rest of 
his life on the land for which he had secured a patent direct from the 
government and his death occurred when eighty-one years of age. His 
wife also died when cjuite old. In all that section of Wells countj^ his 
was renowned as the first brick home and it is interesting to note that 
the clay was dug from pits on the farm and was burned in kilns as a 
local and native industry. Oliver Jones was a Baptist in religious 
faith, and in politics he followed the policies of the Whig party. Oliver 
Jones and wife finally moved from AVells county to Grant county, and 
spent many years in the active pursuit of farming in Jackson town- 
ship. Later they returned to Wells county where Oliver Jones died 
in August, 1899, at the age of seventy-four years, survived by his 
widow, who passed away September 13, 1912, when eighty-four years 
old. She was a Methodist Protestant in faith, had for sixty-four years 
lived and worked in that church, and was one of the first of the denomi- 
nation in her part of the state. Oliver Jones later in life joined the 
same denomination. He was in politics a Democrat. Oliver Jones and 
wife had three sous and five daughters, and three of the daughters are 
still living and all are married. 

Ezekiel Jones was reared to manhood on his father's farm in Grant 
county. After his marriage he moved to Marion and was for three years 
employed in the glass factory there, after which he returned to Upland, 
and has since been one of the active business men in this community. 

Mr. Jones was married in Huntington county, Indiana, to Miss Emma 
Layman, a daughter of Joseph and ilary (Peggy) Layman. Her 
parents lived and died on a farm in Huntington county, her father hav- 
ing entered the land from the government. Both were quite old when 
death came to them, about eighty years of age. They had moved from 
Ohio in the early days to Huntington county, and lived honorable and 
upright lives, and were strict members of the Baptist faith. Mr. and 
Mrs. Jones are the parents of the following children: Nora A. is the 
wife of Theodore Trout, of Mill township, and they have five living 
children; Sarah Leola is the wife of Thomas Hewitt of ilill township 
and they have a son and two daughters ; Joseph Lloyd is employed in the 
Upland Flint Glass works, and is married and has one daughter ; Oliver 
Floyd is assisting his father in the coal and ice trade, and is married and 
has a son and daughter. Three of the sons, bom to Mr. and Mrs. Jones 
died young. ]\Ir. Jones and wife both worship in the United Brethren 
church, of which he is a trustee. He and his sons vote the Democratic 
ticket. 



570 BbACKPORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Abraham M. Lucas. One of Grant county's pioneer families, mem- 
bers of which have for many years been identified with the agricultural 
interests of this section, is that bearing the name of Lucas, and a worthy 
sentative thereof is found in the person of Abraham M. Lucas, who is 
is now carrying on successful operations on his farm in Center township. 
Mr. Lucas has resided in Center township all of his life, having been 
born on his father's farm, five miles southeast of ]Marion, September 23, 
1865, and is a son of Israel and Mary (Williams) Lucas. 

The parents of ]\Ir. Lucas were born in Mercer county, Ohio, and 
there reared and educated, and shortly after their marriage came to 
Grant county, Indiana, locating on a farm five miles southeast of Marion, 
on the Soldiers' Home pike. j\Ir. Lucas was a well educated man, and in 
order to add to his resources during his early years engaged in teaching 
school in Center township. As the years passed, however, he turned 
his entire attention to agricultural work, and eventually became one of 
the prosperous men of his community, owning two well-developed farms 
in Center township. His death occurred about 1873. Five children 
were born to Israel and Mary Lucas, of whom three still survive : I. W., 
a carpenter and contractor living on East Tenth street, Indianapolis; 
Orpha L., who is the wife of James Thomason, of Marion, Indiana; and 
Abraham M. 

Abraham M. Lucas received only limited educational advantages, as 
his father died when he was but eight years old and the services of the 
youth were needed in the operation of the home property. He made the 
most of his opportunities, however, and subsequent reading and obser- 
vation have made him a well-informed man. Reared to agricultural pur- 
suits, he has made farming his life work, and through well-directed effort 
has iDecome one of the substantial men of Center towmship, owning a 
handsome property, consisting of 138 acres, 93 acres in the farm upon 
which he lives and 45 acres about one-quarter mile east of the farm, and 
possessing in the highest degree the esteem and respect of those who 
have had dealings with him. Mr. Lucas has made enormous improve- 
ments on his property, and by the use of modern methods and machin- 
ery has gained a reputation as a progressive and enterprising agricul- 
turist. General farming has received the greater part of his attention, 
but his activities in stock raising have also been rewarded with success. 

On May 23, 1889, Mr. Lucas was united in marriage with IMiss Mary 
Swartz, who was born and reared in Center township, and to this union 
there have been born two children: Gladys M., a graduate of the com- 
mon schools, who died at the age of seventeen years; and Lucetta, born 
November 1, 1893, who has been given good educational advantages and 
now lives at home with her pai'ents. Mr. and Mrs. Lucas are consistent 
members and liberal supporters of Griffin Chapel of the Methodist 
church. Politically he is a Democrat, but has taken no active part in 
public matters, although he has ever been ready to assist in movements 
making for the public welfare. 

George W. Jones. One of the men whose enterprise has contributed 
to the trade and general activities of the village of Upland is George 
"W. Jones, whose earlier life was spent in Jefferson township in fanning 
pursuits and who for a number of years has been in the feed and grain 
business at Upland. Mr. Jones is a man of recognized integrity and fair 
dealing, has a host of friends in the vicinity and has never failed to 
hold up his end of responsibilities, whether in private or in business life. 

The family to which George W. Jones belongs was established in 
Grant county many years ago by Joshua Jones, father_ of George W. 
Jones. Joshua was the son of Lewis Jones, who lived and died 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 571 

in Ohio, was twice married aud had children by both wives. 
Joshua Jones, of the first marriage, was born in Greene county, 
Ohio, JIarch 7, 1819, aud grew up on his father's farm. When 
about twenty years of age he crossed the state line to Indiana and the 
young man without capital found employment among the fanners of 
Blackford county for several years. Then moving into Jefferson town- 
ship. Grant county, he bought some land, most of which was located in 
the wilderness, and by hard work cleared up and made a good farm. 
That was his home for nearly sixty years, and at his death in AugTist, 
1909, he was able to look back upon a lifetime of industry and gratify- 
ing accomplishments. He was a Democrat and a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. Joshua Jones was married in Jefferson town- 
ship to Miss ilaliuda A. wings, who was born in Ohio and came with 
her father, Nicholas Owings, when a young child to Jefferson township. 
Mrs. Joshua Jones died on the old homestead in Jefferson township in 
1905. She w-as an active member of the j\Iethodist church. 

The family record of George W. Jones in his immediate generation 
is noteworthy in several respects. He was the fifth in a family of nine 
children, eight of whom reached adult age, and of those only one is 
deceased, seven living, Mai-y J. having died when twenty-one. All the 
four sons and three daughters are still living and are married or have 
been married, and the youngest is more than fifty years of age and 
the oldest is now seventy. The record of the children is briefly as fol- 
lows : Harriet, w'idow of Michael Houck, living in Upland ; Lydia, who 
is the widow of Edwin Pergiis and lives in California, having a son and 
daughter; Lewis M., a farmer of Jefferson township, and his four 
daughters are all married; John W., one of the foremost farmers in 
Jefferson township ; George W. ; Thomas Eli, who lives in Jonesboro, and 
has a son who is married; Sarah E., the wife of William Ginn, a farmer 
in Jefferson township, and they are the parents of two sons. 

Like the other children George W. Jones was born on the old home- 
stead in Jefferson township, in section twenty-two, on February 14, 1853. 
His youth was spent in the same vicinity, and while growing up on the 
farm he had the cultured advantages afforded by the local school. He 
continued to attend school as opportunity offered until about twenty 
years. To farming he gave his first serious efforts, and in that industry 
laid the foundation for his subsequent prosperity. In 1891 Mr. Jones 
gave up active supervision of farming, and for a short time ran a 
restaurant, but has since been in the feed and grain business at Upland. 
He built his present yards aud buildings, especially adapted for the 
convenience of the trade, in 1905. His home is located close to his 
place of business, and he has lived here continuously for twenty-two 
years. Mr. Jones has always taken much interest in local affairs, has 
served one term as town treasurer, has been liberal whenever a com- 
munity undertaking was proposed, but has been reticent as to the honors 
of political life. In polities he votes the Democratic ticket. 

Mr. Jones was married in his native township to Miss Mary E. Ginn, 
who was bom in Henry county, Indiana, and was fifty-eight years of 
age on October 1, 1913. When she was a young woman she came with 
her parents to Jefferson township, and the Ginn family to which she 
belongs has suitable representation on other pages of this volume. Mr. 
and Mrs. Jones are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
very active in the affairs of their local society. Their two daughters 
are : Clara, the wife of A. J. Kuhn, who is associated with Mr. Jones in 
business at Upland, and they have a daughter, Hildred; Ginevra is 
the wife of Thomas L. Secrist, and they have one daughter, Martha E., 
and their home is in Santa Barbara, California. 



572 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Elge W. Leach. One of the most competent and trusted young 
business men of Grant county is Elge W. Leach, cashier of the Farmers 
State Bank at I\Iatthews. Mr. Leach has the entire executive manage- 
ment of this well known and substantial institution, and it is largely 
owing to his genial personality as cashier and his careful and sys- 
tematic conduct of the bank's affairs that the resources and business of 
the bank have been steadily mounting in importance since he first 
became connected with the business. As a man who has gained success 
and has gone considerable distance on the way to prosperity, ilr. Leach 
attributes his good fortune largely to the influence and counsel of his 
good wife, who for some time assisted him in the bank, and is not 
only an excellent housewife, but is thoroughly competent as an ac- 
countant and business woman. 

Mr. Leach was appointed assistant cashier of the Farmers State 
Bank in March, 1909. and the following year was promoted to his 
present position, since which time he has had all the executive duties 
to perform. The Farmers State Bank of ilatthews was established in 
1907, with a capital stock of twenty-five thousand dollars. In March, 
1909, an entire new management took charge, and since that date its 
prosperity has been steadily increasing, but along natural and healthy 
lines. The personnel of the executive management is as follows: A. D. 
jMittauk, president ; George Fred Slater, vice president ; E. W. Leach, 
cashier; and C. J. Jones, assistant cashier. The Farmers State Bank is 
a county, township and town depositoiy ; its total resources in February, 
1913, were reported as about ane hundred and twenty-five thousand 
dollars, and its relation to the prosperity of this thriving farming com- 
munity is well indicated by the fact that in its vaults and on its books 
are accounts with depositors aggregating in the total nearly one hundred 
thousand dollars. 

Elge W. Leach was born in Fairmount township, August 3, 1879. 
He was reared and educated in the public schools, graduated from the 
Fairmount Academy in the Class of 1901, and the following three years 
were spent as a teacher. At the same time his services were employed 
in an office, and he also did farm work. With this varied experience 
and equipment, he was well prepared for his present vocation. Mr. 
Leach's grandfather was Esom Leach, born in Virginia, reared in Frank- 
lin county, Indiana, and after his marriage there to Luciuda Corn, came 
to Grant county and acquired a large tract of land, comprising more than 
five hundred acres, partly by purchase and partly by entry from the 
government. The rest of his years were spent in residence at this 
estate in Grant county, and his career was one of special prosperity. 
He died when past seventy years of age, and his widow survived him 
ten or twelve years, and was a veiy old woman when taken away. Thej' 
were both communicants of the Primitive Baptist Church. Their 
family comprised thirteen children in all, and eight sons and two 
daughters are still living. Of these children, John B. Leach, father of 
the ilatthews banker, was born in Fairmount township, j\Iarch 4, 1854, 
and has lived in this vicinity ever since, making his home on a farm 
there at the present time. He was married in Jefferson township to 
Miss Hester Richards, a daughter of Jacob and Susan (Gillespie) 
Richards. The Richards family has been identified ^vith Grant county 
for all the years since early settlement, and both Mrs. Leach's parents 
died here when old people. Jacob Richards was an early minister of the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Matthews, the church usually being known 
as the Harmony church, and he lived and labored for many years in 
the cause of religion, spending much of his time in traveling and riding 
about the country horseback, covering the large territoiy and carrying 



BLACKFORD x\ND GRANT COUNTIES 573- 

the gospel to many isolated communities during the early days. Mrs. 
Hester Leach was born in Jefferson township in 1857, and still is smart 
and active and has been a good mother to her children. These children 
of John B. Leach and wife were: Elge W. ; Jacob E., a farmer in Fair- 
mount township, who married Blanch Duling, and has three children, 
Lloyd, Carl, and Helen ; Minnie is the wife of Ernest 0. Crecraft, living 
in Fowlerton, and their children are John A. and Dora Lee; Fern is 
the wife of Nacy Wood, living in Fowlerton, and they have no children; 
Mr. Elge W. Leach was married in Jefferson township to Miss Sarah 
Anderson. Mrs. Leach, who was born in Jefferson township July 22, 
1882, also graduated from the Fairmount Academy with the class of 
1901, the same class with her husband, and is an intelligent and cul- 
tured womau whose presence iu ilatthews society is one of secure ad- 
vantage and esteem. Her parents were Augustus and Elizabeth (Dean) 
Anderson, who for many years were farmer residents of Jefferson town- 
ship. Her father died there in May, 1910, and the widow lives on the 
old farmstead, being about fifty-five years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Ander- 
son were a'etive members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, with which 
Mrs. Leach is also associated. Mr. Leach is & Democrat in politics. 

Thomas F. Scott. People who lead busy and useful lives are not 
often portrayed in public prints, for it is only the abnormal that is 
observed by the current press. That work of homemakiug, of efficient 
performance of dailj^ duties and responsibilities is at the same time the 
most vital and important as well as the least likely to attract general 
attention. Among Grant county people who excel iu this matter of 
running a business with quiet efficiency and making a fine home, Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas F. Scott are well worthy of a record in the Centennial 
history. Their attractive rural home is in section twenty-eight of 
Jefferson township. 

Jlr. Thomas V. Scott is the third bearer of that Christian name in as 
many successive generations. His grandfather, Thomas Scott, was born 
in Ireland in 1775, was of what is known as Scotch-Irish stock, and after 
his marriage to an Irish girl came to America about 1800. The only 
means of crossing the Atlantic at that time was by sailing vessels, and 
a number of years elapsed before the introduction of steam navigation. 
Prom the Atlantic coast Thomas and his young wife came on to Ohio, 
lived for a few years at Steubenville, on the Ohio river, where his son 
Thomas Jr. was born about 1804 or 1805. Later the family moved to 
Noble county in the same state where Grandfather Thomas died when 
probably quite an old man. His sons and his widow later went to 
Guernsey county, Ohio, whei'e she died when very old. She was the 
mother of five sons and three daughters who grew up and married. 

Thomas Scott, second of the name, was married during his resi- 
dence in Noble county, where he became of age, and the maiden name 
of his wife was Nancy McCoy, who was probably born iu Ohio and 
of similar ancestry to her husband. After their marriage, Thomas 
and wife located in Guernsey county, where they were pioneers and 
undertook the tasks allotted usually to the pioneers in the middle west 
of clearing the dense forests and making a landscape of cultivated fields 
where had formerly been only the haunts of wild beasts and Indians. 
By his labor he improved one hundred and sixty acres of land. During 
the eai-ly years of their residence there the nearest town or village was 
five miles away and the mill and post office was three miles from their 
house. Thomas Scott II, was remarkably well fitted for the hard labor 
of pioneering. He was regarded as one of the most skillful wielders of 
an ax in his entire community, and it was his greatest pleasure to 



574 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

swing that implement hour after hour in the woods, that kind of work 
as hard as any that man does, being with him a part of athletic pleasure. 
His first home was a little cabin built of round logs, which was replaced 
somewhat later by a hewed log house, of a story and a half, and what 
was known as a double building, being divided by a partition, and with 
a stone fireplace and chimney. It was a somewhat pretentious home 
for that communitj', and had the same place as a brown-stone front 
mansion would in later years. In 1842, having sold his Ohio home, 
Thomas Scott came out to Grant county, and again became a pioneer, 
securing one hundred and sixty acres of wild land in section thirty-four 
of Jefferson township. There he made a large clearing and by his own 
efforts or under his supervision nearly all the land was cleared up. His 
death occurred in Jefferson township in 1870. A hard-working, thrifty 
and honorable gentleman, he lived long years and ever enjoyed the 
confidence and esteem of the community. His wife followed him in 
death in 1874. They were both Methodists, and from his affiliation with 
the Whig party he came naturally into the ranks of the Republicans. 
There were nine children born to them, three were married, and two are 
still living. Hugh married and left a wife and four children, in order 
to enlist in the Civil war, as a member of the Eighty-Fourth Indiana 
Regiment, going out in 1862, and after participation in a number of 
campaigns contracted smallpox at Nashville, and died from that disease 
in Nashville. The living sons are John A., who is now married and 
lives in Kansas with his family, and Thomas F. 

Thomas F. Scott III, was born in Guernsey county, Ohio, February 
24, 1842. He was nine years old when his parents moved to Grant 
county. He has spent practically all his life in this county, and until 
his father's death was an active assistant on the home farm. 

A great mutual confidence and esteem existed between father and 
son. Mr. Scott has spent nearly all his life on the farm he now occu- 
pies, which was the homestead cleared by the sturdy hands and skillful 
ax of his father. It is regarded as one of the best homes in the vicinity, 
all the land is highly improved and cultivated through the maxinnnu of 
production, and of its building improvements a big red barn was 
erected some twenty-five years ago, and the commodious nine-room house 
has long been the shelter of the Scott family. Mr. Scott is an extensive 
raiser of good cattle, hogs and horses, and keeps the only herd of 
Angora goats in his township, and perhaps the only one in the county. 

On August 12, 1862, Mr. Scott enlisted in Company C of the Eighty- 
Fourth Indiana Regiment of Infantry, the same regiment in which his 
brother saw service. His service continued with that regiment until 
June 14, 1865, and his record of military performance was notable for 
its regularity and faithful performance. He was in every engagement 
hi which his regiment participated excepting one, and twelve of these 
were ciuite severe fights. He had one narrow escape from death when 
a bullet cut a hole through his hat above his right ear, but otherwise he 
went through without injury. He came out as eoriDoral of his company. 

Mr. Scott was married in Jefferson township to iliss Uree A. Slater, 
who was born, reared and educated in Jefferson township, had spent all 
her life here, and belongs to a family long prominent among the leading 
farmer citizens of the vicinity. Her parents were William and Mary 
(Tacy) Slater, both of whom came to Grant county from Noble county, 
Ohio,' and made settlement on land that was new, although it had 
known one or two owners since being acquired from the government. 
Their location was on section twenty-seven of Jefferson township where 
they developed a good home and farmstead and lived until death took 
them away when about sixty years of age. There were four children in 
the Slater family, and all are living and married. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 575 

Mr. and Mrs. Scott have the following children: 1. Charles married 
Florida James, lives ou a farm in Scott county, Indiana, and their chil- 
dren are Hugh and Dorothy. 2. Carrie is the wife of Clarence Needier, 
farmers of Jeft'ersou township and their children are Carl, Ray, Cecil, 
Ernest, Harmon, Thomas and Anna Eiueline. 3. Minnie R. is one 
of the most popular teachers in Jefferson township, has taught 
in the Matthews schools for the past twelve years, and lives at home. 
4. Harry, who is a farmer in Scott county, married Ella Lizenbeck, 
and their children are Frances, Floi^ence J. and Ruth. 5. Norah, is 
unmarried, and is a clerical worker at Muncie. 6. Bertha, is also 
employed at Muncie. 7. Ella lives at home. 8. Clarence W. is now 
his father's assistant in the management of the homestead. 9. Thomas 
W. also lives at home and works on the farm. 10. Anna M. was edu- 
cated in the local public schools like the other children, and lives at 
home. 11. Ada Z. is a sophomore in the Matthews high school. 

Mr. and JMrs. Scott and family are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, and Mr. Scott and sons are regular voters of the Repub- 
lican ticket. Mrs. Scott is one of the vigorous minded and capable 
women of Grant county, possessing an alert intelligence, is broadly 
informed on the issues of the day, and has many progressive ideas in 
home management and in affairs of social improvement. She deserves 
much credit for her success in rearing and educating her large family 
of children, and all of them are exceedingly proud of their mother. 
Mrs. Scott owns in her own right a fine tract of improved land, com- 
prising one hundred and seventeen acres, in section thirty-two and 
thirty- three of Jefferson township. 

John H. Scott. On section twenty-six of Jefferson township is 
located one of the substantial country homes of Grant county. It is not 
a pretentious homestead, its owner is a quiet, efficient worker, and man- 
ager of his resources, and his farm indicates his individual character. 
It comprises seventy-five acres of as good land as can be found in the 
vicinity, and one of the evidences of his thrift and prosperity is a com- 
fortable white house, standing in the midst of a grove of trees, erected 
by him in 1898. A good barn and all other facilities for up-to-date 
farming are on the place, ilr. Scott is one of the very excellent farmers, 
and he and his wife, who has worked along-side of him throughout their 
married career, have succeeded in building up a modest little fortune 
and in rearing a family of good children. More than that could hardly 
be said in praise of anyone, and it is an accomplishment to be proud of. 

Mr. Scott is a great-grandson of Thomas Scott, who was born in 
Ireland in 1775, and was of what is known as Scotch-Irish stock, and 
after his marriage to an Irish girl, came to America about 1800. A 
full account of the family history will be found in the sketch of Thomas 
F. Scott which precedes this. 

Of the family of Thomas Scott II, Hugh Scott Avas born in Guernsey 
county, Ohio, in 1829. He married a native girl of the same county, 
Elizabeth Deereu, who was born May 26, 1834. After his marriage and 
the birth of one child, Adeline, Hugh Scott and wife moved to Indiana, 
and in 1851 bought some new land with a log cabin standing upon it 
in Grant county. They were in very moderate circumstances, and their 
first place comprised only forty acres. However, by the combined 
industry and thrift of husband and wife they were beginning to see 
light ahead, and in fair way to prosperity when the war broke out. With 
the many responsibilities of a family, Hugh Scott remained at home dur- 
ing the first year, but when the heavy calls for volunteers came, in the 
summer of 1862, he enlisted on August 9 of that year in the Eighty- 



576 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

fourth Regiment of Indiana Infantry. Much hard fighting and many 
campaigns did he participate in, but it was not the bullets of an enemy 
which brought his death. The fatal disease of smallpox again and again 
attacked the armies on both sides, and after one scourge he was vacci- 
nated and returned home for a furlough, and finally got well. He then 
returned to the army, though unfit for service, and at Nashville con- 
tracted the most virulent form of the disease, and died while in the hos- 
pital, March 10, 1865, just as the war was entering its final stage. He 
left a widow with five small children, and four of these by her frugality 
and care she reared to manhood and womanhood. She kept the little 
home, kept her children about her, inculcated good morals and habits of 
thrift and industry, and there she died, honored and respected by her 
descendants, February 5, 1909. She, as well as her husband, was a mem- 
ber of the Methodist church. Of their little family the following are still 
living: Sallie, wife of H. H. "Walker, a farmer in Jefferson township, 
and the father of a large family. Fletcher, a resident of Hartford City, 
Indiana, and who by his marriage to Melissa Hudson has six children ; 
and John H. 

John H. Scott was born on the old Scott farm, in Jefferson to^vnship, 
November 23, 1861, and was reared and educated in that vicinity. As 
soon as his youthful strength permitted he did all he could to assist his 
widowed mother, and lived at home until his marriage to Lucinda Leach, 
in 1890. She was born in Fairmount township. May 7, 1868, a daughter 
of William J. and Ellen J. (Havens) Leach, of the prominent family 
of that name in southern Grant county. Her father still lives on the 
Leach farm at Fowlerton. He was born February 2, 1840, and has lived 
as a farmer all his life. His wife, who was born April 23, 1813, died 
April 17, 1888. They were members of the Primitive Baptist church. 
The other children in the Leach family were as follows: Charles E. of 
Fowlerton, who has five children; Anna, the wife of Chalmer Kerr 
of Fairmount township, and the mother of five children ; Martha C, 
wife of Shirlev Hancock, of Jefferson township, and they have four 
children. The "little family of Mr. and ]\Irs. Scott are as follows: Effie, 
who died in infancy; Ira Pearl, who was educated in the grade schools 
and lives at home ; Sarah Ellen, aged eighteen and living at home, hav- 
ing completed the common school course; "William Harvey, who assists 
his father on the home farm; Ancil Everett, who is attending school; 
and Arlie W., also a school boy. Mr. and Mrs. Scott are members of the 
Methodist church, and his political affiliation is with the Republican 
party. 

Martin V. jMontgojiery. A half a century ago hundreds of thou- 
sands of men and boys marched away from comfortable homes and dear 
ones, to offer up their lives on the altar of patriotism. Some dyed that 
altar with their life blood and never returned; others came back but 
have borne through the succeeding years the indelible imprint left by 
the hardships and privations of war. Those who were spared to return 
found difficulties awaiting them ; after years of strenuous endeavor, when 
each minute might be their last— when a nation's life hung upon their 
bravery and endurance, it was no easy matter to resume the ordinary 
occupations of work-a-day life. Yet thousands did this very thing, and 
even today a larger proportion of the best citizenship of this country is 
composed "of veterans of the great struggle between the North and the 
South— men of sound principle, possessed of high moral and physical 
courage who have rounded out lives that will set an enduring example for 
generations to come. Grant county furnished its full quota of volunteers 
during the dark days of the Civil war, and among these was Martin V. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 577 

Montgomery, uow a highly respected farmer-citizeu of Center township, 
where he has passed raanj' .years in the tilling of the soil. 

ilartin V. Montgomery was born March 26, 1841, in Guernsey county, 
Ohio, and is a son of James and Jane (Smith) Montgomery, also natives 
of that state. Some time after their marriage, Mr. Montgomer j' 's par- 
ents removed to Vinton county, Ohio, and in 1854 came to Grant county, 
Indiana, locating in Center township, where thej' passed the remainder of 
their lives. They were honest, sturdy people, industrious and thrifty, 
and Mr. Montgomery was well known in public affairs in his community, 
serving in a number of offices. They had a family of ten children, of 
whom two are living at this time : Martin V. ; and Thomas M., now a resi- 
dent of Pekiu, Illinois, who during the Civil war served for three years 
as a member of Company C, Eighty-ninth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry. 

Martin V. Montgomery received his education in the district schools 
of Vinton county, Ohio, and Grant county, Indiana, and Avas still little 
than a lad when he enlisted for service in Company H, Sixtieth 
Regiment. Indiana Volunteer Infantrj^, after the outbreak of hostilities 
between the States. This comj^any was later attached to Company D, 
of the same regiment, and of the 104 men who originally composed the 
organization, but four returned to Grant county at the close of the war, 
Mr. iloutgomery being one of the four. ]Mr. Montgomery participated 
in some of the most sanguinary engagements that marked the great- 
struggle, and at all times deported himself as a gallant and faithful 
soldier, ever ready and eager to perform the duties which fell to his lot. 
At the battle of ilumfordsville he was taken prisoner, and confined for 
seventeen days, and after Vicksburg took part in the operations on the 
Mississippi, being again captured by the Confederates at New Iberia, 
Louisiana, when he was held for three months before receiving his 
exchange. Later, under Gen. U. S. Grant, he served in Arkansas. 

At the close of the war Mr. Montgomery returned to Grant county, 
and in the same year was married to Miss Martha J. Taylor, now de- 
ceased. He moved to IMichigan in 1873, and was there married to i\Iary 
E. Camper. Mr. and ^Irs. Montgomery never had children of their 
own, but they raised three boys and one girl. Mrs. Montgomery died 
October 24, 1913. While a resident of Big Rapids, IMichigan, Mr. ilout- 
goraery met with an accident which cost him an arm, and following this 
misfortune he returned to Grant county, Indiana, and again engaged in 
agricultural pursuits, in which he has continued to the present time. 
He makes a specialty of raising Poland-China hogs. His farm is in 
excellent condition and is located on the Soldiers' Home pike, about 
five miles southeast of Marion. He is a Republican in his political 
views, but has taken only a good citizen 's interest in public mattei's. He 
receives a pension from the govei'nment in recognition of his services in 
behalf of his country 's flag at a time when secession reared its gory head. 

Jesse Stanley. In the pioneer days of Grant county, when the heavy 
timber covered the greater part of this section of Indiana, and naught 
but blazed trails through the forest marked the way for the sturdy set- 
tlers, the Stanley family became identified with the county's history, 
and from that time to the present its representatives have continued to 
reside here and to be prominent in various lines of endeavor. Industry, 
energj-, honesty and fidelity — these are some of the most marked charac- 
teristics of the Stanleys, and the elemental strength of character in Jesse 
Stanley, of Jefferson township, shows that these qualities are predomi- 
nant in his nature. Mr. Stanley's career has been spent in agricultural 
pursiuts, and his history is an open book, capable of bearing the closest 
scrutiny with honor. 



578 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Evan Stanley, the father of Jesse Stanley, was born in North Carolina 
in 1817, and was still a boy when he left the parental roof to seek his 
fortune in the gi'owing West. He first located in Fayette county, Indi- 
ana, where he secured employment as a farm hand, but in 1838, stiU 
single, made his way to Grant county and entered a tract of forty acres 
of land, on which he erected a small log cabin. There he began life 
alone in the woods, surrounded by the heavy timber, through which he 
would have to search his waj^ to the homes of his few neighbors, miles 
distant, but as the time went on he managed to clear, grub and improve 
his original purchase, and in 1840 he added to his holdings by the pur- 
chase of eighty acres more of land. This was also covered Avith virgin 
forests, but this enterprising and energetic pioneer, who is remembered 
as a short, stout and very rugged man, worked faithfully and constantly, 
put his laud under a good state of cultivation, and when he died, iu 1879, 
was in very comfortable financial circumstances. He was a Democrat iu 
politics, and a good and public-spirited citizen, although never a poli- 
tician. His friends were legion, and although he was not a member of 
auj- religious denomination, he bore a spotless reputation for upright 
dealing and integrity. Mr. Stanley found his wife in Grant county. 
She was Mary J. Vincent, born in Madison county, Indiana, about 1822, 
and died in 1867, a good wife and loving mother, and a faithful member 
of the New Light Christian church. She was a daughter of Elisha and 
Elizabeth Smith Vincent, of Virginia, who were married there and at an 
early day came to Delaware county, Indiana, locating on eighty acres 
of laud. Mr. Vincent died in middle life, .while the mother survived 
until eighty-five years of age, both passing away iu the faith of the 
Christian church. Mr. and Mrs. Stanley were the parents of two chil- 
dren r i\Iargaretta, who is the widow of William Russel, a former farmer 
of Blackford county, Indiana, and the mother of two children, Melville 
and John ; and Jesse. 

Jesse Stanley was born on his present homestead place, located on 
section 11, Jefferson township, Grant county, Indiana, September 20, 
1852, and received his education in the common schools of this locality. 
He was brought up to habits of industry and honesty and thoroughly 
trained in agricultural pursuits, so that when he reached manhood he 
adopted farming as his life work. At the time of his father's death he 
secured the home place, upon which, in 1884, he erected a substantial 
red bam, and in 1885 a large modern white dwelling, and these were 
followed in 1900 by another large barn. These structures are located 
on the old homestead which formerly belonged to his father. From time 
to time Mr. Stanley has added to his holdings by purchase, and on a tract 
of 120 acres has an excellent set of buildings, in addition to which he has 
a third farm ^Yith good structures and improvements, his total holdings 
comprising 418 acres, all located in sections 2 and 11 in Jefferson town- 
ship. He has been very successful in his stockraising and general 
farming operations, and is justly accounted one of the most substantial 
men of his community. 

In 1882 Mr. Stanley was married in Jefferson township to Miss 
j\Iary J. Wise, who was bom on the old Wise homestead in this town- 
ship, October 13, 1859, and reared and educated there, a daughter of 
Jacob Wise, a sketch of whose career will be found on another page 
of this work. To Mr. and Mrs. Stanley there have been born the 
following children : Clinton E., bom July 28, 1883, engaged in opera- 
tions on one of his father's properties, married Julia Atkins, of Black- 
ford county, Indiana, and has one sou, Virgil H. ; Retta 'Si., born July 
28, 1885, who is single and resides at home with her parents; Clarence, 
born August 25, 1887, conducting agricultural pursuits on one of his 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 579 

father's farms, married Blanche Keever; John Clifton; Fred 0., born 
February 8, 1901, who is now attending the graded schools; and Earl S., 
born August 13, 1892, who died in 1894. The children have been given 
excellent educational advantages, the parents being firm believers in 
the benefits to be gained through thorough schooling. Both father and 
sons are Prohibitionists, and although they have not mixed extensively 
in politics, being essentially agriculturists, have done much to further 
the interests of their community in various ways. All are widely known 
and highly esteemed and are filling honorable positions in the world, 
ably maintaining the honor of the name they bear. 

John Clifton Stanley, son of Jesse and Mary J. (Wise) Stanley, was 
bom October 8, 1889, in Jefferson township. After attending the com- 
mon schools, he became a student in the Upland high school, from which 
he was gi-aduated in 1909. He is single, lives with his parents, and is 
assisting his father in the work of the homestead place. A young man 
of self-reliance, with a strong, alert and intelligent mind, he has intro- 
duced a number of innovations into his work, and is known as one of 
the progressive and energetic young agriculturists of his township. 

Edmund F. Ballingee. For nearly half a century the late Edmund 
F. Ballinger was one of the well known agriculturists of Jefferson town- 
ship. Grant county, and during this time through his careful manage- 
ment, sound judgment and unflagging iudustiy he overcame many 
obstacles and steadily worked his way upward until prosperity crowned 
his labors with a fitting reward. It was not alone in the material things 
of life, however, that Mr. Ballinger attained success, for his thorough 
integrity and honorable dealing won him the unqualified respect of his 
fellow-men, and his memory is still kept green in the hearts of a wide 
circle of friends who recognized and appreciated his many sterling 
qualities. 

Mr. Ballinger was descended from an old southern family, his 
grandparents, James and Rebecca Ballinger, being natives of Tennessee. 
There their children, Josiah, Daniel, James and a daughter, were born, 
and during the latter 'twenties, or early 'thirties, the family migrated 
to Indiana and entered land in Miami county. Later removal was made 
to Grant county, where the grandfather carried on agricultural pursuits 
until his death, which occurred at Upland, in advanced years. He had 
married a second time, to Nancy McCoy, and they became the parents 
of a large family of children. The second Mi-s. Ballinger died when 
eighty years of age, and both she and her husband were laid to rest in 
Jeffei-son church cemetery. She was a charter member of this church 
of the Christian faith, to which Mr. Ballinger had original^ belonged, 
although he later joined the Society of Friends. 

Josiah Ballinger was born in Tennessee about the year 1815, and was 
still a youth when he accompanied his parents to Indiana. He was 
married in Miami county, in 1842, to Miss Tama R. Cook, and at that 
time entered land, on which he resided until 1860, then coming to Grant 
county and settling on a property on section 5, in Jefferson township. 
This tract contained something over 100 acres, partly improved, and here 
the father built a hewed-log house, weatherboarded and plastered, which 
was his home until his death. Like his father, he belonged to the 
Quaker faith, and was a man of sturdy qualities. After his death, 
Mrs. Ballinger contracted a second marriage, being united with Richard 
Deeren, a Civil War veteran, who died at the Soldiers' Home, in Febru- 
ary, 1913. Mrs. Deeren passed away at Upland, at the age of seventy- 
two years, in the faith of the Methodist church, of which her husband 
was also a member. 



580 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Edmund F. Ballinger was bom in Miami county, Indiana, July 21, 
1851, and was nine years of age wlien he accompanied his parents to 
Grant count}-. Here he grew to manhood in Jefferson township, attend- 
ing the district school and assisting his father in the work of the home 
farm, and after the death of the elder man he bought the Ballinger 
property, to which he subsecjuently added forty acres. He continued 
to cultivate this land and to make improvements here until his death, 
which occui-red September 15, 1908. Mr. Ballinger was a skilled farmer, 
developed his property to a high state of cultivation, and it contains a 
good set of buildings, including a large white house and two commodious 
red barns. While he met with success in his general farming operations, 
he was probably better known as a breeder of thoroughbred Shropshire 
sheep, and his animals carried off numerous prizes at the various county 
and state fairs. In political matters a Republican, he worked tirelessly 
for the betterment of his community, but did not seek office, preferi'ing 
to devote his entire time and attention to his agricultural operations. 
His religious connection was with the United Brethren church, to the 
teachings of which he was a faithful adherent. 

Mr. Ballinger was married to J\Iiss Huldah Reasoner, of Jefferson 
township, in 1877. She was born in Blackford county, Indiana, October 
27, 1856, and was reared and educated in Jefferson township, where she 
had been brought at the age of three years by her parents, Richard and 
Lydia (Capper) Reasoner. Her father was a native of Ohio and her 
mother of Virginia, and they were married in Grant county and later 
moved to Blackford county, but eventually returned to Jefferson town- 
ship and located on a tract of 120 acres, located on section 5. Here they 
spent the remaining active years of their life, and upon their retirement 
went to Upland, where the father died in June, 1909, and the mother 
June IS, 1898. He had been born September 11, 1828, and Mrs. Reasoner 
November 15, 1832. They were consistent members of the New Light 
Christian church. 

Mr. and ]\Irs. Ballinger were the parents of the following children: 
Perry, bom June 20, 1878, a resident of Antrim county, Michigan, 
where he owns a farm, married Cora Mulkins, and has two children, 
Ivory N. and Marvel P. ; Elva A., born February 28, 1887, attended the 
Upland high school, is now the wife of William C. Horburg, and has one 
daughter, Melva B. ; and Carrie, born October 16, 1889, educated in the 
gi-aded schools and Upland high school, and now in the second year as 
a student of music in Taylor University, is single and residing at home. 
Mrs. Ballinger, who survives her husband, is a consistent member of the 
United Brethren church, and has many warm and appreciative friends 
in its congregation. 

John D. Bell. In the business community of Upland, Mr. Bell has 
been a leading factor for nearly twenty years. His enti-ance into busi- 
ness was on October 15, 1894. Mr. Bell is the fourth successive hardware 
merchant at Upland, and has succeeded in producing a large, prosperous 
concern where others have failed. He has had both the persistence and 
the good judgment and industry required of a man who makes a success 
in retail merchandising, and is now to be ranked among the successful 
men of Grant county. His first attempt at conducting a hardware store 
in Upland occun-ed about nineteen years ago. The Bell store carries a 
splendid stock of varied goods comprised under the general name of 
hardware. This includes both shelf and heavy hardware, stoves, tinware, 
plumbing goods, a complete line of harness, buggies, wagons and farm 
implements, sporting goods, a general stock of household supplies and 
paints, oils, and decorative material. When Mr. Bell began business 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 581 

about twenty years ago his stock was invoiced at a valuation of $280.00. 
His progress is well indicated by the fact that his stock would now in- 
voice at $8,000 or $10,000, and so energetically does he manage his 
establishment that he turns over the capital several times a year. He 
occupies all of a two-story brick building which has a frontage of forty- 
two feet on Main street, and runs back one hundred and twenty-seven 
feet deep. For three years ilr. Bell was on the road selling goods, but 
with that exception had no business experience when he started at Up- 
land, and since then has worked out his own salvation. 

Mr. J. D. Bell was born at Clarksbui'g, in Decatur county, Indiana, 
July 6, 1856. His early life was spent in that vicinity, where he got a 
common schooling, and was educated in a normal school, and with the 
training and qualifications obtained there spent six years as a teacher. 
After that he did plain farming for a few years, and then w-ent on the 
road to sell goods and from that got into the mercantile venture at 
Upland, and thus foimd prosperity. 

Mr. Bell's grandfather was Daniel Bell, a native of Virginia, and of 
English and Irish extraction. In early life he moved to Lexington, 
Kentucky, where in 1803 he married Nancy Smith. Some years later, 
in 1822, he took his family to Decatur county, Indiana, where he pur- 
chased a squatter's claim of almost new land, and the items of the family 
history is that his first crops were destroyed by wild game eating the 
grain and roots, and otherwise devastating the fields. His first purchase 
was one hundred and sixty acres, and he also entered eighty acres in 
Fuget township of Decatur county. He was one of the pioneers of that 
section, and in time his labors brought about a splendid farm which 
represented his pioneer activities. He was remarkable for the length 
of his life notwithstanding the many hardships which he had gone 
through in his early years. When he died about 1876 he was ninety-five 
years of age, and his w'ife who passed away in 1883 was ninety-six years 
old. They were Methodists in religion, and took an important part in 
establishing the activities of that church in Decatur county. In political 
faith he -was a Whig during his early manhood. The original land, 240 
acres, in Fuget township, Decatur county, Indiana, originally owned by 
Daniel Bell, is still in the Bell family, with the exception of forty acres. 
Tarleton R. Bell, father of the Upland merchant, was born in Ken- 
tucky in 1818, and was still a child when his family moved to Decatur 
county, Indiana, where he grew up as a farm boy and spent the early 
part of his manhood. Before his marriage he went to Tennessee, and 
was for some time engaged in railway grade contracting. In that state 
he met and married Emma E. Adams, Avho was born and reared in Ten- 
nessee. Finally they returned to Indiana, and settled on the old Bell 
farm in Decatur county. After that the occupations of carpenter and 
farmer occupied the attention of Tarleton Bell, until his death in 1882. 
His widow is still living, at her home in Greenburg, Decatur county. On 
October 14, 1913, she was eighty years of age, and in spite of her four- 
score years is bright and keeps up with the current news of the day, and 
often entertains her pioneer friends at the regular annual meeting. She 
has been a lifelong member of the iMethodist Episcopal church, and her 
husband %vorked with her in the same faith. He held to the political 
policies of the Democratic party, and living in a Republican district w^as 
at one time nominated for the office of representative, and nearly suc- 
ceeded in overturning the normal Republican majority. He was a close 
friend of the Hon. William S. Holmau. 

Mr. J. D. Bell was one of six children ; a daughter, Mrs. Mary Chene- 
worth, lives in Los Angeles, California; Wilbur is a farmer near Bur-, 
lington, New Jersey, and has a family of children; Emma is the wife 



582 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

of William E. Tull, of Fairmount, Minnesota, and has one daughter; 
Nora lives with her mother in Greenburg, Indiana, her filial devotion 
never having permitted her to marry; George died when forty -three 
years of age, leaving several children. 

At Clarksburg, in Decatur county, Mr. Bell married Miss Emma C. 
Cain, who was born at Matamora, in Franklin county, Indiana, March 
3, 1857. She grew up and received her education in the same locality. 
Her parents were Doctor C. C. and Eliza A. (Clements) Cain, her father 
well known as a prominent physician and surgeon at Matamora in Frank- 
lin county, and for sixty years practiced his profession and was one of 
the old-time country doctors who took his services to his patients regard- 
less of personal discomforts and physical obstacles and inconveniences. 
Dr. Cain died at the ripe age of ninety-five, and his widow was ninety- 
six when she passed away. They were likewise active members in the 
Methodist religion. Mr. and Mrs. Bell have no children. Fraternally 
Mr. Bell is affiliated with Arcana Lodge No. 427, F. & A. il., at Upland, 
and is lodge treasurer. He and his wife are Avorking members in the 
Upland Methodist church in which he is trustee and recording steward, 
offices which he has held for the past eighteen years. He is also a trustee 
of Taylor College at Upland, and has given his official interests to that 
institution for the past three years. 

James H. Seiberling. In the career of James H. Seiberling is 
exemplified in a marked degree the fact that merit wins recognition 
and that industry, perseverance and well-applied effort always bring 
just rewards, although some times they may seem delayed. As the 
president of the Indiana Rubber and Insulated Wire Company, he is 
one of the most forceful business figures in Grant county. He would 
have probably succeeded in any other field, for he possesses those 
qualities which make for success, but Jonesboro should feel grateful 
that he has centered his interests in this line and in this locality. 

The Indiana Rubber and Insulated Wire Company was organized in 
1890, with a capital stock of $200,000, as a corporation, and started the 
manufacture of insulated wire as its special feature, but three years 
later began also to make soft rubber goods. James H. Seiberling was 
the first president and has continued in that office to the present time. 
George Tate was the first vice-president, and was succeeded in 1898 by 
J. Frank Peterson as the holder of his stock, the latter being made a 
director at that time. He is a resident of Chicago. Nicholas Huber, 
of Akron, Ohio, became vice-president in 1908 and still retains that 
office. A. Frank Seiberling, a son of James H. Seiberling, became the 
first secretary and later superintendent and assistant treasurer, as well 
as a member of the board of directors. The first treasurer was Monroe 
Seiberling, a brother of James H. Seiberling, who continued to act in 
that capacity until his death in 1910, he being succeeded by S. H. 
Miller, a manufacturer of Doylestown, Ohio, who is also a member 
of the directing board. The present officers are as follows: James H. 
Seiberling, president and director; Nicholas Huber, vice-president and 
director; A. Frank Seiberling, superintendent, assistant treasurer and 
director; S. H. Miller, treasurer and director; R. W. Seiberling, son of 
James H. Seiberling, secretary and director; W. J. Richardson, time- 
keeper and director; J. Frank Peterson, member of the board of direc- 
tors. This enterprise has grown to large proportions, and at this time 
gives employment to about 400 people, the business amounting to some 
million and a quarter dollars annually, or about one hundred thousand 
monthly. It has become one of the leading industries of this part of 
the state, and is known as one of the largest in its special line in the 



BLACKFORD AND GEANT COUNTIES 583 

countiy. A part of the large plant is operated by steam and the rest 
by electricity. At this time the factory is turning out great numbers 
of automobile tires and inner tubes, over 1000 bicycle tires a day and 
a full line of rubber supplies, as well as a great amount of insulted 
wire. This latter was the only product of the business when it was 
organized and continued to be the main line of manufacture for three 
years, when the rubber goods were added. 

The directing head of this company, James H. Seiberling, is known 
to practically every business man of Grant county. He is a man who, 
although deeply engrossed in the concerns of a large and growing 
industry, has found time to cultivate his social nature and to enjoy 
the pleasures of companionship with his fellow-men. Mr. Seiberling 
was born in Summit county, Ohio, November 25, 1835, and comes of 
German ancestry. His great-grandfather, John Frederick Seiberling, 
was boru in Germany, and came to America in young manhood, locating 
at Liunville, Lehigh county, Pennsylvania, where he spent the remainder 
of his life, passing away at an advanced age. Nathan Seiberling, father 
of James H. Seiberling, was born in Lehigh county, Pennsylvania, 
about the year 1810, and grew up a farmer. He married a Pennsylvania 
girl and they began their married life on a farm in Lehigh county. 
Subsec|ueutly the father moved to Ohio and settled on a farm in Norton 
township, Summit county. The grandfather was a remarkable man in 
many ways, was alert and active to the last, and fully retained the 
possession of his faculties. He came to Summit county, Ohio, in his 
ninety-third year and died there. While a resident of Linnville he had 
served as postmaster for sixtj'-five yeai-s, and when he died was the 
oldest postmaster in the United States. Although a whig and a 
Republican, Mr. Seiberling was never opposed by the opposite party's 
candidates. From the time of the emigrant the family has been identi- 
fied with the Lutheran church, and of this John Frederick Seiberling 
and his wife were both faithful members. Their children were: 
Joshua, Sarah, Nathan, Peter, John and William, and probably several 
other daughters. All of these grew to maturity, were married and had 
families. 

Nathan Seiberling, the father of James H. Seiberling, was born in 
Lehigh count}', Pennsylvania, and there was married to ]\Iiss Catherine 
Peters, who was born about 1812 in that county. Shortly after their 
union, about 1830 the young couple traveled overland with teams across 
the mountains into Norton township. Summit county, Ohio, and there 
settled in the woods, the father building a little log cabin, in which 
James H. Seiberling was later born. After some years this cabin 
home was supplemented by a good frame house. IMr. Seiberling 's first 
purchase amounted to 100 acres, but through energy, thrift and per- 
severance he managed to accumulate a competency, and was known at 
one time as one of the large landholders of his county. The old home- 
stead is now occupied by his youngest son, Gustavus. It was in the 
home they first settled that Nathan Seiberling and his wife died, the 
former iii 1899, when five months less than eighty years of age, and 
the mother in 1894, at the age of eighty-three years. They were life- 
long members of the Lutheran church. ]Mr. Seiberling was a Whig and 
later a Republican, and for several years acted in the capacity of justice 
of the peace and held various township offices, in all of which he demon- 
strated his ability, his faithfulness to duty and his good citizenship. 
There were thirteen children in the family of Nathan and Catherine 
Seiberling. the greater number of whom were married and had issue. 
The living, all at the head of families, are: James H., Charles G., 
Columbus, Milton, Gustavus and Sarah, a widow. 



584 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

James H. Seiberling grew up on the home farm and was given only 
au ordinary education, as he was expected to assist his father in the 
work of the homestead, and continued to remain with him until he was 
twenty-five years of age. He was reared to habits of honesty and 
industry, and earl.y learned the value of hard, persistent labor. When 
tweuty-tive years of age, Mr. Seiberling was married, and at that time, 
with his brother John, embarked in the manufacture of fai'm imple- 
ments, at Doj-lestown, near Akron, Ohio. This business was continued 
for some forty years, and in connection therewith the Seiberliugs 
operated a foundry. This business is now conducted by S. H. Miller, 
who is also a member of the rubber and 'wire company, although James 
H. Seiberling has an extensive interest in the implement business still. 
He also is part owner of the plate glass works at Ottawa, Illinois. As a 
sturdy, enterprising and up-to-date citizen, Mr. Seiberling has accom- 
plished an incomprehensible amount of good for Jonesboro. His aggres- 
siveness, coupled with his energj' and prolific mind; his honesty as an 
example and precept: his capability as a man of opinions, public and 
private, all have combined to entitle him to the appellation by which 
he is known — one of the worthy and valuable men of the county, in 
social, industrial and commercial circles. 

Mr. Seiberling was married in Summit county, Ohio, to Miss Eliza- 
beth Baughman, who was born in 1838, and there reared and educated, 
and still active and alert in spite of her age. She is a daughter of David 
and Elizabeth (Blocker) Baughman, natives of Pennsylvania and early 
settlers of Summit county, where they spent the remainder of their lives 
on a farm. They were faithful members of the Reformed church and 
widely known and highly respected in their community. Mr. and jMrs. 
Seiberling are the parents of the following children: Martha, who 
became the wife of J. W. Richards, a director of the rubber company, 
and died without issue; A. Frank, director and superintendent of the 
rubber works and a prominent business citizen of Jonesboro. who 
married in this city Angelina Cline, and has two childi'en, Paul and 
Catherine, who are attending the public schools; Ollie, whose death 
occurred at the age of fifteen years; George, who died when eighteen 
months old; Allen B., who passed away at the age of four and one- 
half years: and Robert "W., secretary of the rubber company and one 
of his city's progressive young men, who married Genevieve Linu and 
has one son, James Linn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Seiberling and their children have continued in the 
family religious faith, belonging to the Lutheran church. A Republican 
in his political views, ilr. Seiberling cast his first vote for Abraham 
Lincoln, and has continued to support the Grand Old Party to the 
present time. He has long been a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, while his sons hold membership in the Masonic fra- 
ternity. The beautiful home of the Seiberlings, a modern, brick struc- 
ture, overlooks Jonesboro and the Mississinewa river, and is one of the 
finest residences in Grant county. 

"Wade B. Teeter. The leading druggist of Upland, Uv. Teeter 
maintains a modern store, well stocked with pure drugs and with a large 
stock o&druggists' sundries, at the corner of Slain and Railroad streets. 
This store was opened in 1907 by Levi A. Teeter, father of Wade B., 
but the latter has been the regular pharmacist from the start. A short 
time before the store was established he graduated in the pharmacy 
department of Purdue University in 1907. 

Wade B. Teeter was born at Pleasant Hill, Miami county. Ohio, 
September 14, 1882. The family moved to Grant county in 1890. lived 
for a time in Pleasant township, and later in Upland, where he graduated 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 585 

from the high school in 1900. For several years Mr. Teeter alternated 
between attendance at school and college and teaching and other forms 
of employment which were in the nature of preliminary steps in his 
regular career. In 1904 he graduated from the Marion Normal College, 
having previously taught school for one year and then taught another 
year, after which he entered Purdue University and completed the course 
in pharmacy. Mr. Teeter is a member of the Grant County Pharmacy 
Association and of the National Retail Druggists Association. Mr. 
Teeter is of Pennsylvania Dutch stock. Plis grandfather, Jacob Teeter, 
was born in Pennsylvania, later moved to Pleasant Hill in Miami county, 
Ohio, where he was a successful merchant for some years. "While there 
his son Levi A. was born January 11, 181:7, and when a small boy lost 
his mother. Jacob Teeter married for his second wife a Miss Ward, and 
they continued to live in Miami county for many years, but Jacob died 
at his home in Dayton, Ohio, when eighty-seven years old. His widow, 
now about seventy years of age, lives in California. During the earlier 
generation the Teeters were all communicants of the Dunkard church. 

Levi A. Teeter, who was one of the younger of his mother's children, 
was reared at Pleasant Hill, and from early boyhood gained a practical 
acquaintance with mercantile affairs under the eye of his father, a 
merchant at that place. He was given educational advantages that may 
properly be considered liberal, and after the common schools was a 
student in the Normal College at Lebanon, Ohio. For some years he 
taught school in Ohio, Indiana, and Nebraska. While teaching in 
Wabash county of this state he met Miss Ellen Bloomer, and their 
acquaintance ripened into marriage. After being married they lived 
three years in Ohio and then came to Grant county, where Mr. Teeter 
was engaged in farming in Pleasant township until 1890, and from 
that date until 1910 he was in business at Upland. In 1910 he returned 
to Ohio and located near Farmdale in Trumbull county, where he owns 
considerable property and is now living retired. He and his wife are 
members of the Methodist church, and he is a Republican in polities, and 
has had a long and busy and useful career. Levi Teeter and wife had 
the following children: Von E., who lives at home with his parents and 
is unmarried ; Wade B. ; J. Russell, who graduated from the Indian- 
apolis Dental College in 1914: Clara, who was for a time a student in 
DePauw University and now lives at home; and Francis, who is in the 
public schools. 

ilr. Wade B. Teeter was married in Grant county in Monroe town- 
ship to iliss ilabel ilittank, who was born in Jefferson township in 
1888. Her parents are Mr. and Mrs. Amaria A. Mittank. Mrs. Teeter 
was graduated from the Matthews high school in the class of 1910. To 
their marriage has been born one child, Louine, on November 15, 1912. 
Mr. and Mrs. Teeter are members of the Methodist church. In politics he 
is a Progressive, and is now serving his home locality as town clerk. 
Fraternally he is affiliated with Arcana Lodge No. 427 of the Masonic 
Order, and belongs to the Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

Jacob Wise. The career of the late Jacob Wise was one not only 
of long years, but marked by eminent usefulness as a man and citizen, 
and in many ways he made his impress on the Grant County community, 
which was his home for about sixty years. 

Jacob Wise was born in Center county, Pennsylvania, February 15, 
1833, and died at his home in Jefferson township of Grant county, 
December 12, 1909, when seventy-sis years of age. His parents, Daniel 
and Catherine (Beckles) Wise, were of Dutch ancestry, and both natives 



586 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

of Pennsylvania, the former born August 30, 1805, and the latter in 
1807. They were married in Center county. Daniel Wise was a skilled 
carpenter and cabinet maker, and he followed his trade for some years 
in Pennsylvania, though in later years he was chiefly a farmer. During 
their residence in Pennsylvania, four sons came into their home, and also 
a daughter, Ann Margaret, who was born and died in 1832. Then in 
1848, the entire family set out for Indiana, placing all their earthly 
belongings in a small wagon, and making the entire journey across the 
country and camping at night by the wayside. On arriving in Grant 
county they spent a short time with a friend Isaac Roush in Mill town- 
ship, and in the fall of the same year moved to Jefferson and acquired 
two hundred acres of land in section four. Only three acres of that 
tract was broken with the plow, and a log cabin was the home which first 
sheltered them in this county. After a naimber of years of hard labor 
and many difficulties the father prospered and came to be regarded as 
one of the most substantial citizens of his community. He was able to 
spend his later years in peace and comfort, and died in 1895, when 
ninety years of age. His widow passed away May 6, 1897, also ninety 
years old. They were both of the Lutheran faith, and were hard workers, 
kind neighboi-s, and in every respect good, thrifty people. Their chil- 
dren are given brief record as follows: John, born January 27, 1830, 
and died in Jefferson township, December 20, 1887, married Mary A. 
Marine, also now deceased, and their children were Samuel, M'ho died 
at the age of twelve years, and Jonathan, who died after he was married. 
The second in the family is Jacob. Henry, born March 25, 1835, is a 
retired fanner of Gas City, and by his marriage to Maggie Simons, has 
several children. Samuel, bom March 3, 1838, died unmarried, Novem- 
ber 21, 1864. 

Jacob Wise was fifteen years old when the family came to Grant 
county. He had an education perhaps of about the average amount 
and quality for the boys of his time, and had his share of pioneer labor 
in developing the estate in Grant county. In 1856 he was married, and 
he and his wife then located on eighty acres given them by his father-in- 
law, Asa Marine. To this their subsequent good management and in- 
dusti-y added three hundred and twenty acres, and the entire place was 
improved with a fine set of farm buildings and was improved as a com- 
fortable and profitable home. 

In Jefferson township on March 13, 1856, Jacob Wise married Eliza- 
beth Marine, who was born January 15, 1836, in Wayne county, Indiana. 
She belongs to the ilarine family that has been so prominently identified 
with Grant county from the early days, and since the death of her hus- 
band she has continued to reside at the old homestead, Avhere she owns 
two hundred acres of laud. Though approaching the age of fourscore 
she is a hale and vigorous old lady, intelligent and well able to look 
after her busiuess interests, and enjoys the esteem and admiration of a 
large circle of friends. Her parents were Asa and Lydia (Huff) 
Marine, both natives of South Carolina, and of Quaker stock. They 
came separately to Indiana, and were married in Wayne county, and 
from there moved to Grant county, Avhere Asa Marine bought land on 
the Mississiuewa and developed a home from the wilderness. His first 
wife died there in 1860 and he was again married and had three children 
by his second wife. The Marine family has many interesting connec- 
tions and relations with Grant county history, and further information 
can be found touching its membership, and activities under the name of 
Daniel Marine elsewhere in this volume. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Wise became the parents of the following family 
of children: Samuel, who is sketched individually on other 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 587 

Mary J., who was born October 13, 1858, is the wife of Jesse Stanley, 
a prominent farmer of Jefferson township, and they have several chil- 
dren ; Solomon is a farmer in Jefferson township ; Daniel lives on a 
farm in Jefferson township, and has a wife and children; Frank is 
living at home with his mother, is unmarried, and is considered one of 
the largest hog raisers and stock dealers in the county; Elmer, now 
married, lives at South Bend, Indiana, and has a daughter ; Alice, is the 
wife of Howard Simons, a farmer of Monroe township, and they have 
a son and daughter ; Lydia is the wife of George Himelick, a successful 
farmer in Jefferson township, and they have a family of eleven children. 

Joseph Moerow, the elder, was born in the state of North Carolina, 
A. D. 1799, and when a lad was brought to Wayne county, Indiana, by 
his father, John Morrow. 

He was reared to agricultural pursuits, and for a time was engaged 
therein, but subsequently became engaged in mercantile lines at New- 
port (now Fountain City), Wayne county, and while residing there 
served for a period as justice of the peace, and as a member of the 
State Legislature from Wayne county. 

In 1843 he came to Grant county and located on his farm, bordering 
on the JMississinewa river, a part of which is included in the site of 
Gas City. In the spring of 1851, having sold his farm, he moved to 
Jonesboro and for several years was engaged in the dry goods business at 
that place, but finally retired from business entirely on account of 
advancing age. 

In politics Mr. Morrow was originally a Whig and later a Republi- 
can, and was always opposed to slavery. He served twice as a member 
of the state legislature for Grant county, the last time in the winter of 
1850 and 51. At this session an attempt was made to detach a portion 
of Grant county and add it to Blackford county which Mr. Morrow 
successfully resisted. His death occurred in 1863. 

By his first wife he had, while living in Wayne county, four children 
of whom Joseph, whose history follows, is the only survivor. His second 
marriage was to Mary Smith, the sister of his first wife, and by that 
union there was born, in Grant county, three children: Alcinda L., 
Andrew T. and Lavina J., of whom Andrew T. is now the only one living 
and now a resident of Kansas and who was for many years a civil 
engineer in the United States service and for a time in the Argentine 
Republic, S. A., where his sister Alcinda L., who while young began her 
career as a teacher in Grant county, had been and was then engaged in 
teaching, having first acquired a proficient knowledge of the Spanish 
language and who recently died at Los Angeles, California, where she 
was highly respected as a teacher and for her charitable work. It is 
now proper as a conclusion to this historical sketch of Mr. Morrow's 
life to say that he was exceedingly conscientious in all his dealings with 
his fellowmen, and was highly circumspect in his demeanor, and always 
an unswerving advocate of what he believed to be correct principles of 
political and social life. 

Joseph Morrow, Jr., a pioneer of Grant county, whence he came in 
1843, and an esteemed citizen of Marion, has been a witness and partici- 
par* in the wonderful development of this section of the Hoosier state, 
and although now living a quiet life, retired from business activities, is 
still interested in the growth and progress of his community. 

Mr. Morrow in his boyhood was denied many of the advantages con- 
sidered necessary to the education of the youth of today, and his early 
training or knowledge was secured largely by dint of his own unaided 



588 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

exertion as opportunity was afforded liim in connection with the school of 
hard work. His steadfast determination and industry have enabled him 
as will herein be further disclosed to make for himself an honorable 
place in life. He was born September 9, 1838, and was the son of 
Joseph and Letitia (Smith) Morrow. 

He was four years of age when he was brought by his parents to 
Grant county, and here he received his education in private and public 
schools. After going to Jonesboro he clerked in the stores of his father 
and afterward, for several years, in those of other merchants ; and subse- 
quently for a time served as first assistant teacher in the graded school 
at that place. 

In 1866, at the age of twenty-eight years, he was elected clerk of 
Grant county on the Republican ticket, and continued to serve in that 
office for four years, and following this was a member of the Grant county 
bar and thence devoted a portion of his time to the practice of probate 
law. 

Later Mr. Morrow was connected with the North Indiana Conference, 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, as a minister, but withdrew from the 
conference at a session held in Ft. Wayne, in 1874. He had joined the 
church at the age of IS years, at Jonesboro, and was soon made a local 
preacher and served as such for many years. 

In 1898 Mr. ilorrow removed to Traverse City, Michigan, where he 
resided for eight years, at the end of which time he again took up his 
residence in ilarion. Grant county, and soon retired, on account of 
failing health, from all active secular pursuits. 

On March 27, 1864, Mr. Morrow was married to Miss Mary A. 
Taylor, one of Grant county 's school teachers. She was born in England, 
daughter of William and Mary Ann (Pitch) Taylor, where Mrs. Taylor 
died. Afterward, in 1849, J\Ir. Taylor with his children came to the 
United States and settled in Grant county, Indiana, where he became 
engaged in agricultural pursuits on a farm located between Jonesboro 
and Fairmount and there his death occurred about five years later. 

Jlrs. IMorrow was the youngest of five children bom to her parents,^ 
and is now of them the only survivor. 

Her father's second marriage was to Rebecca Rich of Grant county, 
now deceased, by whom he had two children, Joseph, now also deceased ; 
and Eli who lives in Kansas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Morrow have three children, the eldest. Flora Elma 
Baldwin, wife of Dr. M. F. Baldwin, of Marion ; and Arthur J., now a 
member of the city council, of Marion, whose wife was Anna il., daugh- 
ter of Augustine and Loretta Kem ; and Aleinda Estella, wife of 
Thomas H. Sherman, a merchant of Traverse City, Michigan, where they 
now reside. Mr. Morrow's character is so well known and so fully to be 
inferred from the foregoing as to make particular reference to it here 
unnecessary. 

Heney D. Carter. Eighty-five years ago the first of the Carter 
family to become identified with what has in more recent years been 
known as Grant county, made his way from North Carolina into this 
section of the country, and from then to now men of the name have 
been worthily connected with the enterprises that have made of Grant 
county the progressive and prosperous district that it is. 

Henry D. Carter, now deceased, represented the third generation 
of the name in Grant county. He was a son of George Carter and 
a grandson of Solomon Carter, the one who first settled here, and 
concerning those worthy pioneers it is proper that some mention be 
made at this point. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 589 

Solomon Carter came of an old North Carolina famil^y whose 
habitat there had long been Randolph county, which has in "the past 
century contributed much new blood to the growth and upbuilding 
of this county. He was born there in the latter part of the eighteenth 
century, and there was reared. In young manhood he was married. 
His wife's surname was Jane, and with their family they migrated 
to Grant county, Indiana, about 1827. It is not to be thought that 
they found conditions other than most primitive in those early days. 
The state was young, having been admitted to the Union but a few 
years previous, and Grant county was in a particularly undeveloped 
and uninviting state. I\Ir. Carter had come to make a new home in 
a new land, however, and he did not permit the conditions that con- 
fronted him to daunt him in any manner. The result was that he 
settled down in what is now Center township. Grant county, his place 
being located on the turn of the Mississinewa River, a spot of singular 
beauty even in those wilderness days. 

Here Solomon Carter and his wife passed the closing years of 
their busy and fruitful lives, death claiming them there not many 
years after they had settled, when they were somewhere between the 
ages of sixty and seventy years. They reared a fine family of seven 
sous and two or three daughters, none of which are living today. All 
of them married with the exception of Solomon Jr., who was a veteran 
of the Civil war and died in the Soldiers' Home in Illinois when he 
was quite an old man, and Jane, a daughter, who died aged 16 years. 

Of these children, George Carter, who became the father of Henry 
D., of this review, was a good sized boy when his parents came north. 
He saw much of pioneering in the days of his residence on the home 
farm in Center township, and when he reached his majority and 
began to look about for himself, he felt that he could do no bettter than 
to take some Indiana land on his own account. He accordingly entered 
120 acres in Section 9, Mill township, and when he married a little 
later, he located on this new and uncultivated spot of land. There 
he built a log house, small but comfortable, and until 1850 he lived 
the life of a pioneer farmer. In that year they built a fine frame house, 
in which they passed their remaining years. He died on April 3, 1889, 
and his wife passed away on April 10, 1903. Both had reached a fine 
old age, and were ready to go when their summons to another life came 
to them. They were reckoned among the finest citizenship of their time, 
and as suecessfiil farming people of a splendid type, they had a 
secure place in the esteem of their fellows. Mrs. Carter particularly 
was known to be one of the most excellent managers of her day, and 
proved herself possessor of qualities and powers in matters of finance 
that undeniably had nuich to do with the prosperity they enjoyed. She 
retained her splendid mental vigor and much of her physical strength 
until the closing hours of her life. They were long active members of 
the United Brethren Church and were among its early organizers in 
their community. Mr. Carter was a prominent man in the community 
as an office holder, and his interest in the affairs of the church was 
such that he was usually to be found holding some important office in 
the administration of its activities. Their home was the free aliiding 
place of all the itinerant preachers of the day, that being the period 
characterized by the circuit riders of the church, and all knew that the 
Carter latch string always hung out with a hearty welcome forthcoming 
to those Avho would avail themselves of it. Mr. Carter was a Republican 
in his political faith. Twelve children were born to ]\Ir. and ilrs. 
Carter. The names of the twelve in the order of their birth are here 
given as follows: 



590 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Eliza J., bom in 1838 and died in 1848. Mary Ann, born in 1840, 
and now J\lrs. Bond. She is without issue and has her residence at the 
Old Ladies' Home of IMarion. John was born in 1842 and died in the 
same year. Susanna was born in 1843 and died in 1849. Elizabeth, 
born in 1845, died in 1846. Lydia, born in 1846, died in 1871. She 
married Thomas Knight and had one son. William Carter was born 
in 1850 and died in Febiniarj-, 1912, on his fine farm home in Mill 
township. He married Elizabeth Knight, now living in Marion, Ind., 
and they have one son. ilartha was born in 1851 and she died in 1875, 
two years after her marriage to Jesse Bogue, without issue. Solomon 
Jr. was born in 1854 and now is a resident of Marion. He married 
Lydia Linder and is the father of three children. Lucy R. was born in 
1856 and married Daniel Gibson. She died in 1898, leaving a son and 
daughter. Rachel J. was born in 1860 and died in 1862. Henry D. 

Henry D. Carter grew up on his father's farm and early in his 
boyhood he gave evidence of those qualities that make for unqualitied 
success in the farming enterprise. After he married he located on a 
farm of seventy acres in Section 31, Mill township, and there he spent 
the remainder of his life. He improved the place until it reached a 
high plane of modern completeness, and his barns and other similar 
buildings were built and equipped in a manner that left nothing to 
be desired. They were among the finest in the state and were built 
along scientific lines, in a manner most approved by experts in the 
line. His poultry house was a model of completeness with cement floors 
and every possible arrangement conducive to the comfort and general 
productiveness of the poultrj'. 

In addition to his own place Mr. Carter came into ownership of the 
old homestead farm of 120 acres, which is another of the fine places 
of the county. His widow now owns and operates these places, with a 
success that is praiseworthy and that reflects great credit upon her as 
a manager. 

Mr. Carter was a man of splendid native ability and of wonder- 
fully fine character. In addition to the care and conduct of his two 
farms he was largely engaged in the contracting business, road and 
street building being his line. Two years before he died he suffered 
a stroke of paralysis, and though he did not eujoj' the best of health 
thereafter, he was able to attend to his duties in his former manner. 
He was a Republican and died a member of the Christian church. 

On IMarch 27, 1880, Mr. Carter was married in Fairmount town- 
ship to Miss Sarah C. Lamm, born in Jackson to^vnship, Miami county, 
Ind., on January 18, 1857. Her mother, Johanna (Elliott) Lamm, 
died when Mrs. Carter was six weeks old, and she was reared by her 
grandparents, Isaac and Rachel (Overman) Elliott in Center township. 
Grant county, Ind. The home of the Elliotts in those days was on 
the spot now occupied by the National Soldiers' Home. The Elliotts 
in the earlier days entered the land from the government, and there 
they lived and filially died, after which the land was sold back to the 
government by their "son. Isaac, Jr., as a site for the proposed National 
Soldiers' Home. The Elliotts were of an old Quaker family, and people 
of many excellent qualities of heart and mind. The father of Mrs. 
Carter was Edmond Lamm, a native of Randolph county. North Caro- 
lina, who came to Miami county, Indiana, as a young man. in company 
with his parents, Caleb and Sarah Lamm, who passed the closing years 
of their lives in that county. They, too, were Quakers. Edmond Lamm 
was reared to farm life and he entered land in Jackson township, in 
Miami county, there passing his life, which, though busy, was unevent- 
ful. He was" sixty -two years of age when he died and he had been three 
times married. The children of his first marriage were three in number, 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 591 

and besides Mrs. Carter there were Mrs. Margaret J. Bund^', now 
living at Converse, in Miami county, and Rachel, who died at the age 
of eighteen years. By his last marriage Mr. Lamm had one daughter, 
who died in infancy. 

Mrs. Cai-ter was educated in the public and normal schools and was 
for five years prior to her marriage engaged in teaching. She is the 
mother of Prof. George E. Carter, of Port Arthur, Texas, and an 
instructor in manual training at that place. Professor Carter married 
Esther Shafer of Jouesboro, Indiana, and has one daughter, Margaret 
Catherine. Frank, another son of Mrs. Carter, is now in the branch 
house of a Cincinnati, Ohio, roofing concern, with headquarters in 
Chicago much of the time. He is not married. 

Hazel Carter, a daughter, has been given an excellent education in 
the public schools and the Terre Haute (Ind.) Normal School and in 
Bradley Institute, having specialized in Domestic Science and Economy. 
She is now a successful instructor in that important branch in the 
Marion Normal. 

Mary, the youngest daughter, is a graduate of the Marion Normal, 
and is engaged in kindergarten teaching. 

Dwight is a graduate of the Marion Normal Institute in 1913, and 
he is busy at home, helping his mother to manage the farm, which 
is known as Oak Grove Terrace, and their combined skill and energy 
has been resultant in the most thriving and pi-osperous conditions about 
the place. 

ilrs. Carter is a member of the Friends church, and is one of the most 
highly esteemed and popular women of the community. 

Ivy Luthee. To be well born is one of the greatest blessings that 
can come to a child. Ancestry counts for benefits and becomes a matter 
of pride only as it confers attributes of character and family traits that 
enable later generations to live more fully and with greater usefulness 
to themselves and their community than the generations that have pre- 
ceded them. No matter how much may be charged to circumstances and 
environments in the making or marring of character, it is as true as the 
hills that "blood will tell." These remarks have special application to 
the Luther family in Grant county. They come of many generations of 
strong, sturdy Americans, characterized by mental and moral qualities of 
a high order, and the present generation has well lived up to the stand- 
ards set by its predecessors. 

The family history is authentically traced back to John Luther, a 
brother of Martin Luther, the great German and reformer and founder 
of German Protestantism. One of the descendants of that John Luther 
came from Germany to England prior to 1630. The first American of 
the family was also named John Luther, born in England before 1630, 
and emigrating to the American colonies previous to 1640. This immi- 
grant was known as Captain John Luther, and was killed by Indians 
in Delaware Bay in 1644. He married Sarah Butternut, who was 
probably an English girl, and they were probably married in England, 
since their son Hezekiah Luther, next in the line of the family history, 
was born in England in 1626. Hezekiah Luther married and had 
children, among whom was Michael Luther, who was born in Maryland 
about 1656-7. From Maryland he moved south into North Carolina, 
settling in Randolph county, the point of origin for so many Grant 
county settlers. There he died in 1734. In religion he was a Methodist. 
He was twice married and had children by both wives. 

From Michael Luther to Godfrey Luther, there is a break in the 
family genealogy, of one or perhaps two generations. Godfrey Luther 



592 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

was born December 14, 1776, and died August 3, 1855. He grew 
up in Randolph county of North Carolina, and married Elizabeth Stride, 
who was born in 1779, and died in 1816. They were farming people 
and members of the Methodist faith. Godfrey and Elizabeth Luther 
had five children, Sarah, Jacob, Martin, William and Catherine. Of 
these children Martin was born in Randolph county. North Carolina, 
September 6, 1805. He grew up in his native vicinity, took up farming 
as his occupation, and married Sarah (Sally) Kearns. She was born 
in Randolph county in 1807. After their marriage, which occurred 
about 1830, they settled on a farm in Randolph county, and spent the 
rest of their lives the're. He died March 26, 1883, and she on December 
15, 1892. Their religious faith was Methodist. 

The children of Martin and Sarah Luther were as follows : 1. Mary 
Ann, born August 18, 1832, died after her marriage to Richard Graves 
and left a family. 2. Ivy was born February 22, 1834,_and is head of 
the well known Grant coiinty family of that name. 3. "James "W. was 
born July 14, 1836, and died unmarried during the Civil war in North 
Carolina. 4. Josiah was born March 4, 1840, died in his native county, 
and married Anna Crawford, and their children were Elsa and Martin. 
5. Martha E. died after her marriage .to M. Lathroek, and left children. 
Ivy and Vetura. 6. Emily Maria is the wife of William Fletcher Hicks, 
and has seven children. 

Ivy Luther, whose birth has been noted, and who is now in his 
eightieth year, has had a long and honorable career. Reared on a farm, 
he early found himself out of sympathy with the tide of public opinion 
before the war, and when the war broke out was conscripted for service 
in the Confederate army. Instead of going to the front he managed to 
secure an appointment in the Government Salt Works, but soon after left 
the south and journeyed to Henry county, Indiana. There he had his 
home for seven years, and then moved to Grant county, where he bought 
eighty acres of laud adjoining the Fairmouut corporation. He has placed 
many improvements including a iiue home and barns and other out- 
buildings on that land, and is living in comfortable circumstances. 

In Randolph county. North Carolina, Mr. Luther was married August 
28, 1855, to Sarah Stuart, who was born in Randolph county, August 
21, 1833. She was reared and educated in that vicinity, and she and her 
husband were school children together. Her parents were Jehu and 
Rebecca (Hicks) Stuart, natives of North Carolina, where they lived and 
died as substantial farmer people and strict adherents of the Quaker 
faith. The Stuart family has an interesting genealogy. Jehu Stuart, 
father of ]Mrs. Luther, was a son of Henry and Mary (Nelson) Stuart, 
both natives of Chatham coimty, North Carolina, and farmers and 
Quakers. Henry Stuart was in turn the son of Alexander and Elizabeth 
(Pike) Stuart. They were married in Frederick county, Virginia, in 
1759, thence moving to Chatham county in North Carolina, where they 
died at a good old age. Alexander Stuart, going back still another gen- 
eration, was a son of Robert and Martha (Richardson) Stuart, natives 
of Pennsylvania, where they were married, and afterwards moved to 
Virginia. These last named couple were of English parents and were 
probably immediately descended from some of the Quakers who came 
over with or soon after William Penn and located in Chester county, 
Pennsylvania. 

Mr. and ]\Irs. Ivy Luther have the following children: 1. Dorothy, 
was born in Grant county, received her education in the city high school, 
and also the Earlham College at Richmond and the State Noi-mal School 
at Terre Haute. She was for seventeen years a successful teacher in 
the city public schools and now lives at home. 2. Narcissa is the wife 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 593 

of Elias Bundy, an attorney of Marion. Their two children are Homer 
L., and Howard E., both in the city schools. 3. James A., is one of 
the prominent business men of Tei're Haute, Indiana. He is one of the 
executive officials in the National Drain Tile Company, is connected 
with the Lower Vein Coal Company, and an ofScial in various banks 
and other corporations. He married Lizzie Scott, and their children, 
Forest J., and B. Agues, are both married. 4. Emily R., is the wife 
of Alvin B. Scott, a well known business man of Fairmount, whose 
family history will be found on other pages. I\Ir. and Mrs. Luther are 
both prominent members of the Friends church at Fairmount, and at 
the present time in point of years are the oldest couple in the local con- 
gregation. Their children were all reared in the same faith. Mr. 
Luther in political allegiance is a Prohibitionist. 

Reuben Fritz. On North Main Street in Fairmount, the meat mar- 
ket enterprise of R. Fritz & Son has been a very successful establishment 
since its opening in the fall of 1901. Mr. Reuben Fritz with his son is 
a, practical butcher and meat man, and they conduct a high class shop, 
with all the facilities for serving their customers with good meat. They 
kill all their own stock, and buy their cattle and hogs from the local 
farmers. They also manufacture the by-products into salable stuffs for 
the local market, and both in their slaughter house and shop have every- 
thing arranged for sanitary and expeditious handling. 

Reuben Fritz was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, January 22, 1851. 
His grandfather Peter Fritz was bom near Pottstown, Pennsylvania, 
was a farmer, and of good German stock, known in that locality as 
Pennsylvania Germans. His wife was a native of the same state, and 
soon after their marriage they moved to Ohio with a little colony of 
Pennsylvania people, numbering about half a dozen families. They made 
settlement on new land in Liberty township of Fairfield county. There 
the grandparents developed a fine farm, and prospered. They died 
when well past seventy years of age and were members of the German 
Reformed Church, where the grandfather was a Democrat in politics. 
There was a large family of children, and two sons and about half a 
dozen daughters grew up, were married and had children. Two ai-e still 
living, ilrs. Rachel Bowser is a widow living in Allen county, Indiana, 
while j\Irs. Mary Mauger now lives at Etna, Ohio, with a daughter. 

Martin Fritz, father of Reuben, was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, 
in 1828, and died in the latter part of 1851, soon after the birth of his 
first and only child, Reuben. He was married in Fairfield county to 
Catherine Solidaj', who was born in that county about 1830. Her 
parents came from Pennsylvania, at an early day, and were among the 
pioneers of Fairfield county, where they lived and died as prosperous 
farmers, and as members of the German Reformed church. Mrs. Cath- 
erine Fritz after the death of her husband married Absalom Arnold, 
of Fairfield county, where he was a farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Arnold lived 
in Fairfield county until their death, she at the age of seventy-six, while 
he pi-eceded her in death. There were five Arnold children, and Nansen. 
George, Frederick, and Emma all married and have families, and all 
are residents of Fairfield county, except the daughter, whose home is in 
Denver, Colorado. Mr. Arnold married for his first wife a ^liss Weist, 
and had two sons and two daughters, of whom the two sons are still 
living. 

IMartin Fritz was a member of the German Reformed church, while 
his ^^■ife after her second marriage .joined the United Brethren church. 
Reuben Fritz, after the death of his father, lived in the home of his 
grandfather Peter Fritz, until he was about twelve years old, and after 



594 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

that with his step-father Mr. Arnold. When he reached his majority, he 
started out to make his way as a farmer. He was married at Baltimore, 
Ohio, to Catherine Gehring, who was born in Licking count}', Ohio, a 
daughter of Henry and Mary Gehring, natives of Wuertemberg, Ger- 
many, and married in Newark, Ohio, where they lived, and also in 
other places in that state until locating at Baltimore. Mr. Henry Gehr- 
ing died at Baltimore fifteen years ago at the age of sixty-four, while 
his widow later moved to Fairmount in Grant county, and lived with 
her daughter Mrs. Fritz, until her death in November, 1910, at the age 
of seventy-six. The Gehring family were Methodists. There were a 
large number of children, and two sons and two daughters are still 
living. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Fritz lived in Baltimore, Ohio, 
where he learned the trade of butcher, and did business in that line there 
until 1900. He then moved to Fort Wayne, Indiana, and eighteen 
months later to Fairmount. 

Mr. and ilrs. Fritz are the parents of two children. Nellie is the 
wife of William H. Lamb, a stock buyer and real estate dealer in Balti- 
more, Ohio. They have three children, William, Catherine L., and Vir- 
ginia. The son Harley H., the partner of his father in the meat market 
at Fairmount, Avas born, reared, and educated in Baltimore, Ohio. He 
learned the trade of butcher under his father, and has been in partner- 
ship since 1890. He was married in Fairmount to Miss Myrtle Hart, 
who was born and reared near Warsaw, Indiana. They have no chil- 
dren. Both Mr. Fritz and his son reside on South Main Street in 
Marion. Both are loyal Democrats, and all the family attend worship 
in the Methodist church. 

John Alpheus Carter. The Carter family of which John A. Car- 
ter is a representative has lived long in Grant county, and has been 
characterized by many of the more substantial virtues of citizenship 
and private industry. The following article refers briefly to the main 
points in the family history since the beginning of its Grant county resi- 
dence, and mentions the different members of the family. 

John Alpheus Carter was one of the family of Isaac W. and Phebe 
(Whitson) Carter. Isaac W. Carter came from Clinton county, Ohio, 
in 1855. Two years earlier he had married a Grant county woman, Miss 
Phebe Whitson. She was a daughter of Amos Whitson, a pioneer of 
Liberty township in the Bethel Friends neighborhood. Her father 
moved to Valley Mills many years before his death. Phebe Whitson 
had three sisters, Mrs. Ann Shugart, Mrs. Hannah Ellis, and Jlrs. Mary 
Metcalf, all of whom reared families in Grant county. Isaac W. Carter 
also had a sister, Mrs. Louisa Walthall, who reared a family in this 
county. Isaac and Phebe Carter were among the best known pioneer 
Quaker families in Grant county, and both were useful citizens in the 
Bethel community. He always looked out for the welfare of his family 
and she was a woman to go about the neighborhood wherever there was 
sickness and need of neighborly ministrations. Her death occurred at 
the family homestead, and he died at the home of a daughter in Marion, 
having abandoned the country as a place to live, although he always 
maintained citizenship in Liberty, caring more to vote in that township. 

The sons and daughters of Isaac W. and Phebe (Whitson) Carter are : 
John A. Carter; Joseph E. Carter; Mrs. Louise C. Harmon; and Mrs. 
Ida C. Kern ; William A. Carter, deceased, and Alice and Rosetta Carter, 
who died in childhood. All the other children have families about them. 

William A. Carter, now deceased, married Miss Anna ilay Jay, 
and their children are : Chester, Eli, Jennie and David. Chester Carter 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 595 

married Miss Chestie Wise, and has two children, Ilene and Margaret. 
Eli Carter married Miss Dessie Hubert, and has a son, Hubert Carter. 
Joseph E. Carter married Miss Delia Coggeshall, now deceased, and their 
children are : Pearl ; Earl ; Ray, who married Miss ilarie Kelly ; and 
Arthur, who married Miss Tabitha Emmons. Mrs. Louise C. Harmon 
is the wife of J. F. Harmon and their children are Madonna, Frances 
and Robert, and a daughter Clyde, who died in childhood. Mrs. Ida 
C. Kem is the wife of Oren E. Kem (see sketch of Augustin Kem), and 
their children are Edith and Carter Kem. 

John Alpheus Carter, who recites the family history, married Miss 
Minerva Hiatt, and their children are : Omar Isaac Carter ; Mrs. Lena 
H. Moore ; and Miss Hazel May Carter ; and Harry, who died in infancy. 
Mrs. Lena H. Moore is the wife of E. L. Moore, and has three children, 
Harold, Herbert and John Moore. 

' The will of Isaac W. Carter provided that the three sons have the 
farm land and that the two daughters be paid in cash for their interests, 
and thus the homestead remained in the family name. William A. 
Carter, who became owner of the old home, was the first to die, and a 
son lives on the farm, while Mrs. Carter lives in Fairmount. 

John A. Carter left the farm several years before the death of his 
father, although he continiied to reside in the country for a few years 
after taking a position as raral mail carrier. He began his duties in 
that position on July 16, 1900, while the system was still an experiment 
in Grant county. The first carrier over a country mail route out of 
Marion was A. B. Comer, and his service began in September, 1899. 
The second was L. E. Rinehart, who is still doing duty, while ]\Ir. Carter 
has been on route No. 3 for more than thirteen years, and is the second 
oldest rural carrier. All the rural routes in Grant county were com- 
pletely covered for the first time on August 15, 1902, a little more than 
two years after Mr. Carter first began delivering mail to country patrons. 
In all his thirteen years he has missed less than a week except for his 
annual vacation, and he has always had the friendly support of his 
patrons. 

The Carter family has always been relied upon in the commi:nity 
where these sons and daughters were reared, and their friendly inter- 
ests will always remain there, although J. E. Carter is now the only rep- 
resentative of the family in the township of Liberty. When the Straw- 
town road was built — the second gravel road in Grant county, I. W. 
Carter, the father, was a promoter, and with two neighbors, Willis 
Cammack and George Davis, undertook the contract for the mile begin- 
ning at the Liberty-Franklin Line, and passing the Carter farm to the 
Bethel road. The contract for the next half mile was taken by Tristara 
Conner, David M. V. Whitson, and Richard Jay. The neighbors thus 
concerned worked much together in developing the community, and it is 
that kind of cooperation that counts for community advancement. Isaac 
Carter, Willis Cammack, and David Wliitson owned a horse-power 
threshing machine together for several years. That was at a time when 
it required many more men and horses to thresh the crop than now, and 
the dinners seiwed all over the neighborhood were the products of many 
women clubbing together. Threshing was always a social event and 
there has always been a subsequent friendship among the younger gen- 
eration of all those families. 

In speaking of this old neighborhood policy and the Carter partici- 
pation, J. A. Carter said the rule was "Always go or send a hand," no 
matter what was going on in the community that required cooperation. 
And even while the interview was in progress, arrangements were being 
made over the telephone for all the town relatives to go out to the old 



596 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

farm on the following day for the annual threshing event. Although 
Isaac "W. and Phebe Carter are gone, they will not soon be forgotten in 
the neighborhood centering about Bethel Friends church in Liberty. 
J. A. Carter's mail route is past the old home, and while he no longer 
follows the plow, he is in daily communication with the people who look 
after affairs, and the Carter ambition, as in the past, is to be abreast of 
the times in everything. The young people in the second and third gen- 
erations have all been given splendid educational advantages, and citi- 
zenship is of a high type in the family. The Carter farm in Liberty has 
always been a model and when results are in evidence anywhere the 
crops there have been abundant. The Carter burial plot is near the 
entrance to Friends Cemetery, and a beautiful shaft marks the last 
resting place of the family. 

John A. Meek, M. D. For a period of more than forty years the 
late Dr. John A. Meek was engaged in the practice of medicine and 
surgery at Jonesboro, and during this time rose to a commanding posi- 
tion among the members of the profession in Grant county. The pioneer 
physician of Jonesboro. he gained a widespread reputation for his skill, 
his devotion to his calling and his broad sympathy, and was equally 
well known and respected for his sterling citizenship and his upright 
and honorable life. Doctor ]Meek was of Scotch descent and came of a 
southern family which was for many years prominent in Kentucky. 
His father, Joseph Meek, was bom in that state about the year 1790, 
and came about the year ISIO to Indiana, locating on a farm in the 
vicinity of Richmond, "Wayne count}', where he was married to Miss 
Julia Smith, daughter of John Smith, the founder of Richmond. Mr. 
Smith was a native of North Carolina, where he married a Quakeress, 
and soon thereafter moved to Wayne county, where he became one of 
his community's best known citizens, was Richmond's first blacksmith 
and merchant, and donated large tracts of land to his adopted place. 
After their marriage ilr. and Mrs. Meek located on a new farm near 
Richmond, and there were born their eleven children : "William, Samuel, 
Dr. John A., James R., Sarah J., Nathan, Margaret, Alfred, Allen, 
Sarah Ellen and Jane. All grew up and were married except William, 
Samuel and Sarah Ellen, and but two now survive. Dr. Allen Meek of 
Hollingsburg, Ohio, and ^largaret, an eighty-year-old resident of Wayne 
county. Joseph Meek and his wife continued to live on the old home- 
stead throughout the remainder of their lives, and were both about 
eighty-nine years of age when they died. They were faithful members 
of the Methodist church, and Mr. Meek was a Democrat in his political 
views. 

John A. Meek was born on the home farm in Abington township, 
Wayne county, Indiana, December 8, 1820. He was reared to the 
pursuits of the farm, but early decided upon a professional career and 
accordingly began the study of medicine under the preceptorship of 
Doctor Sw'aller, an early physician of Abington, Wayne county. There 
he was married to ^liss Sarah Weaver, daughter of Adam "Weaver, a 
native of Pennsylvania of German parents and one of the very first 
settlers of Abington township. 

After the birth of three children, Perry S.. James R. and Mary E., 
Doctor ileek came to Jonesboro, where on February 14, 1848, he estab- 
lished himself as the first physician of this place. Here he was engaged 
in a successful practice until August, 1862, when he enlisted in the 
Federal army as a surgeon for service during the Civil War, and became 
2nd Lieutenant and Surgeon, serving as a field officer of the Eighty- 
ninth Regiment, Indiana "^'olunteer Infantry. After more than two 






^ 




BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 597 

years of active service lie received his honorable discharge, and returned 
to the duties of his practice at Jonesboro, where he continued one of 
the leading members of his profession until his retirement in 1S89. 
From that time until his death he lived quietly at his home, although 
he never ceased to be interested in the advancement made by the calling 
or the progress made by his adopted city. Probably few physicians 
of Grant county have been more favorably known. His high ability, 
his devotion to the interests of his patients and the broad and unfailing 
sympathy which he displaj'ed at all times endeared him to those who 
came in contact with him whether in a professional or social way, 
and in the affairs of his city he ever maintained a sterling citizenship 
that made him a promoter of- all things that stood for the advancement 
of education, religion and morality. He was a Democrat in his political 
views, and his religious belief was that of the Methodist church, in the 
faith of which he died July 11, 1901. 

Doctor Meek.'s first wife died in 1854, and on June 4, 1862, he was 
married to Miss Diana R. Pool, who was born at Petersburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, December 25, 1840. When she was eight years of age she was 
taken to Tuscarawas county, Ohio, by her parents John V. and Hannah 
(Milburn) Pool, the former born in Maryland and the latter in the 
city of Baltimore, that state. The Pool grandparents were German 
birth, while John and Ursula (Drake) ililburn, Mrs. Meek's maternal 
grandparents, were natives of England. John Milburn seiwed as sheriff 
of Baltimore county, Maryland, for some years, but later moved to 
Ohio, where he died at the age of eighty-eight years. Johu V. Pool 
came to Grant county in 1852, and spent the remainder of his life in 
Jonesboro, where he died in 1854, at the age of fifty-two years, while 
his wife, who was born May 2, 1808, passed away Febniary 17, 1887. 
They were members of the ilethodist church, in which Mr. Pool was 
for many j^ears a class worker. 

Ten children were born to Doctor and Mrs. Meek, of whom five died 
in infancy, while one son, William, passed away after marriage. The 
living are as follows: Charles M., born August 28, 1865, and educated 
in the schools of Jonesboro, is a cornicemaker bj^ trade and now a 
resident of California. He married Miss Emma Brewer, and has one 
child, A. Milburn, who is sixteen years of age. Herman W., born June 
5, 1874, a barber by trade with an establishment at Marion, married 
Lillian Gagen. Frank, born January 19, 1880, and educated at Oberlin, 
Ohio, is a telegraph operator of Jonesboro and single; Harry Clyde, 
born May 29, 1884, was educated in the graded and high schools of 
Jonesboro, and at Marion, Indiana. He was formerly a telegraph 
operator and is now connected with the Indiana Rubber and Insulated 
Wire Company as an automobile tire maker. He married in Jones- 
boro Miss Lelia F. Dunn, who was born in South Carolina, they have 
one daughter, JIary Belle, born August 24, 1910. 

Mrs. Meek still survives the Doctor and resides in her pleasant home 
in Jonesboro. She is widely known in social circles, and among the 
members of the jMethodist Episcopal church which she joined as a child 
of fourteen years. 

Merrill L. Lev?is. The Marion hardware store is a familiar institu- 
tion, not only to the citizens of the county seat, but to practically all 
the people from the surrounding country who buy their goods in the 
city. The manager of this store is Merrill L. Lewis. Mr. Lewis is a 
native of Genesee county, New York, but most of his early life was spent 
in ]\Iichigan. He was married on Christmas Day of 1873 to Miss Julia 
Breckenridge of Hillsdale county, Michigan, and after living in Lansing 



598 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

and Indianapolis, the family located in Marion in 1886. Since that 
time Mr. Lewis has been actively identified with the community. To 
this marriage were born three daughters: Geunie, Iva and Marjorie. 
The mother died October 5, 1896, ten years after the family located in 
Marion. Mr. Lewis afterwards married Mrs. Mary Roehm, and a 
daughter, Florence, was born to them. 

"When JMr. Lewis located in Marion he was a traveling hardware sales- 
man through Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan, and Marion was central to 
his territory. He could be home frequently, and the family much en- 
joyed a home built to their own order on West Fourth Street, but later 
an opportunity came for entering a retail business and the residence 
was sold toward the investment. 

Mr. Lewis first bought an interest in the Campbell and Ludlum Hard- 
ware Store, and later organized the Marion Hardware Store, of which 
he is business manager. He had his first experience in selling hardware 
in Lansing, and after five years as a retail clerk went into the wholesale 
trade as a knight of the grip. For fourteen years he traveled over three 
states, where he developed a splendid trade among hardware dealers. 

Mr. Lewis associated himself with others in the hardware trade in 
Marion, the store being in the Wilson block, but as the business increased 
more room was required, and W. C. Webster built the present store room 
to fill the demands, planning ventilation, light and heat to suit the re- 
quirements. There is no better equipped hardware store about the 
country. Miss Gennie Lewis is the efficient bookkeeper, and it is nothing 
unusual for her to go on the floor and wait on the trade — an unusual 
occupation for a woman. Miss Lewis has specialized on seeds, a fine 
stock always carried by the store. 

It was in 1910 that the Marion Hardware store was moved into the 
present location, Washington and Fifth Streets, and a large force of 
men is required to take care of the trade. The firm has an extensive 
patronage from Marion factories, and from building contractors, and its 
farm patronage is excellent. No business in the city has better patron- 
age, and there is no more efficient corps of salesmen waiting on trade 
than at the Marion Hai-dware Store. There is no man in town who has 
the good of the community more at heart, and Mr. Lewis has always been 
a ' ' booster. ' ' He is always allied with any advance movement, and 
when a subsidy must be raised he is always ready to solicit funds. The 
whole community recognizes the worth of a man who labors in its inter- 
ests. Some of the business men who have subscribed to factory subsidies 
have learned what to expect when they see M. L. Lewis and other busi- 
ness men enter their doors — there is need of money to boost some local 
industry. The community effort to equip the Marion Normal Institute 
was his special ambition, and he was gratified at the response of the 
people when the subsidy was raised for it. 

On Sunday morning Mr. Lewis takes his place at the First Methodist 
church, a soi-t of a doorkeeper in the House of the Lord, and strangers 
as well as members are welcomed alike and offered a hymn book and 
psalter used in worship there. He always finds a seat for the stranger, 
and people visiting a church are glad of such attention. While the 
Lewis family has not always lived in Grant county, it is certainly part 
of community affairs, and fills a niche both in the social and business 
world. While he is surrounded by a competent force of salesmen, all 
of them defer to him in many things, a man who thoroughly knows the 
hardware trade and understands a profitable and uecessarj' business, 
and that is what makes of the Marion Hardware store a necessity in the 
community. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 599 

Orlando H. Couch. There are probably few progressive farmers and 
stock men in eastern Indiana who are not familiar with at least the 
reputation of the Matthews Stock Farm of which Orlando H. Couch is 
proprietor. This stock farm, located in Section Five of Jefferson Town- 
ship is the seat of a big industry and one which for value and usefulness 
of its output equals any large industrial factory or commercial estab- 
lishment in the county. Of the one hundred and twenty-one acres com- 
prising the farm, one hundred acres are under intensive cultivation. Some 
of the features which at once attract the eye, and indicate the class of 
business done on that place is a large red barn, a silo of fifty-tons capac- 
ity, a first-class grain barn, a stable for the stallions, and a comfortable 
and commodious house of eight rooms. An unfailing supply of good 
water is furnished both to the house and to the stock farms by means of 
windmills and gasoline engines. Besides the facilities on the farm itself, 
Mr. Couch and his brother own a large brick property fifty by three 
hundred and fifty feet in Matthews, and utilize that for the feeding and 
breeding of hogs during the winter seasons. Some of the best red Duroc 
swine in the country can be found on the Matthews farm, and they are 
raised both for breeding purposes and for market. Mr. Couch keeps 
about four hundred head of these red Durocs. Jersey cattle is another 
specialty of his, and he has perhaps made his greater reputation as a 
successful breeder of Percheron horses. His Percherou stallion known 
as Lafayette, is a thoroughbred and was imported from France in 1909. 
Lafayette weighs twenty-two hundred pounds and cost tweuty-five hun- 
dred dollars. An even greater horse by record and reputation is the 
Belgian stallion, Martin De Cappelle, which was imported in 1908. 
This horse weighs twenty-two hundred pounds, and cost Mr. Couch three 
thousand dollars, won the gold medal at Chicago as the champion Bel- 
gian stallion in 1908, and has not only proved valuable in a financial 
way to its owner, but has been the source of much up-breeding and im- 
provement in the horse stock in this community. Mr. Couch has followed 
stock farming since young manhood, and has proved himself both a prac- 
tical and scientific breeder and manager of live stock. All his colts have 
turned out well, and many of them have won prizes in the exhibitions. 

Orlando H. Couch is a member of a family that has been identified 
with Grant county since the early days, and a somewhat detailed history 
of the family and its connections will be found elsewhere in this publi- 
cation, under the name of Thomas M. Couch, a brother of Orlando. 
Orlando H. Couch was born in Jefferson township June 10, 1870, a son 
of Samuel and Nancy (Furnish) Couch. The maternal grandfather was 
Judge Benjamin Furnish, one of the early settlei's of Jefferson township, 
who entered large tracts of land, and that land, or a considerable part of 
it, has been in the possession of some of his descendants down to the 
present time. Mr. Couch was one of a family of five sons and two 
daughters, all of whom are married and have families of their own, 
except one sister, Nettie, who died after marriage to L. E. Richards. 

Orlando H. Couch was reared and educated in his native township, 
and since twenty-five years of age has given all his attention to the prac- 
tical business of farming and stock breeding. In Madison county of this 
state, on August 31, 1893, he married Miss Ida M. Worth, who was born 
in Van Buren township of Madison county, March 24, 1873, was reared 
and educated there, is a daughter of James and Elizabeth (Hoppis) 
Worth, who lived and died in Madison county, passing away in the full 
ness of years. Mr. and ]\Irs. Couch are the parents of eight children, 
whose names and some facts about whom are mentioned as follows: 
HaUie L., who graduated from the Matthews high school with the class 
of 1911, but still remains at home. Wade S., who is attending high 



600 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

school ; Marion G. ; Howard 0. ; and H. Joseph, who are all three in the 
grade schools; Helen M. ; and John R. The oldest child, Samuel W., 
died at the age of eleven weeks. Mr. and ilrs. Couch attend worship in 
the Baptist church, and in politics he is a Democrat. 

Joseph Needlee. The Needier family record in Grant county goes 
back eighty years. It was established here about three years after 
Grant county became an organized civil community. Joseph Needier 
is a son of the pioneer, and is of the third generation consecutively 
residents in the eount}^ His own career has been spent as a farmer in 
Jefferson township, where many years ago he won a place as a substan- 
tial citizen, and is now enjoying the fruits of his long and well spent 
years, on his home in section thirteen of that township. 

His grandfather Needier was a native of Germany, was a young 
man when he came to America, and his marriage occurred probably 
in Pennsj'lvania. From Pennsylvania they moved to Virginia, where 
James, father of Joseph, was bom and probably other children. Later 
the family moved to Guernsey county, Ohio, and very late in life the 
grandparents moved into Grant county, where they passed away when 
very old. Their bodies now rest in a family lot in Jefferson township. 

James Needier who was one of six sous, was bom in Virginia, about 
1800. All of them came to Indiana, all were married and had children 
and are now deceased. James Needier grew up in Guernsey county, 
Ohio, and there married Rebecca Ward. She was born in Ohio. After 
their marriage James and wife lived in Guernsey county, and while there 
Eliza J., Sarah, George, and John were bom into their household. 
Early in the thirties they determined to find a home in the then new 
country of eastern Indiana. It was customary among the pioneers often- 
times to go to the country they had in mind, look over the laud, select 
the place, and purchase it from the government, and make some little 
improvement preparatory to the establishment of the family. Thus 
in 1833 James Needier came into Jefferson township, and after selecting 
a place in the wilds he put up a rough log cabin. In 1834. having in 
the meantime gone back to his family, he brought the entire house- 
hold and all their movable possessions to Indiana, and started life in 
the midst of a wilderness. His location was in one of the most remote 
and unsettled portions of the township, and for several years practically 
the entire substance of the family was derived from wild game. He 
often killed bear and deer within a few rods of the home. James Needier 
became the owner of four hundred acres of land in that township. The 
old log cabin was in time replaced -s^ith a substantial house, and his 
industry and good management introduced many other improvements 
and comforts into the family economy. James Needier died when about 
eighty-two years of age, and his wife passed away in 1871. They de- 
serve' to be mentioned among the hard-working, thrifty, and honest people 
who had the strength and sturdiness of character of the early population 
of Grant county. Mr. James Needier was a member of the ilethodist 
church, though' he made no profession of religious faith. In politics 
he was a Democrat. Joseph Needier who was one of the youngest of 
the six sons and six daughters, and who has three brothers and two 
sisters still living, was bom on the old homestead in Jeft'erson town- 
ship, August 31, 1841. As his recollection goes back nearly seventy 
years he readily recalls some of the customs and institutions which have 
long since become obsolete in Grant county. For instance, he attended 
one of the old subscription schools, supported by contributions from 
the individual families, and taught by an itinerant schoolmaster. Ever 
since reaching man's estate, Joseph Needier has depended upon his own 




MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH NEEDLER 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 601 

resources, and being thrifty and industrious gradually aceummulated 
enough to enable him in 1881 to purchase one hundred and twenty acres 
of fine land in section thirteen. Since then all of that place has been 
improved with the exception of fifteen acres of native timber, and there 
is a full set of excellent farm buildings, including the comfortable 
residence in which he lives. The faiTQ is now operated by others, and 
I\Ir. Needier has no occasion for wori-y over his financial circumstances, 
since he has ample to keep him in comfort the rest of his life. 

ilr. Needier was first man-ied to Nancy J. Owings, who was bom 
in Delaware county, Indiana, a daughter of George and Ruth (Owings) 
Owings, her parents being cousins. Her family were among the promi- 
nent early settlers of Delaware county. Mrs. Needier died in Jefferson 
township when comparatively young. She was an intelligent and 
lovable woman, a capable assistant to her husband in his early efforts, 
and she is cherished in the memory of her children. Her children were : 
Elmer, who died at the age of twenty-one years, having been fatally 
injured when struck by a piece of timber; Orlando C, a successful 
farmer, and the owner of ninety-five acres in section thirteen of Jeffer- 
son township, married Sarah E. Ballenger; Lacy, wife of Carl Osborn; 
and Louis L., whose career is given in more detail on other pages of 
this work. The second wife of Mr. Needier was Mrs. Elizabeth (York) 
Wilds, who was born in Henry county, Indiana, and by her marriage 
to William Wilds had three children, as follows: Fred, who is married 
and has a family, his home being in Eaton, Indiana; Mamie Pearl, wife 
of Harry Pancoast, of Eaton, and their children are William and Arlis ; 
and Leonard, the youngest, died aged two years seven months. j\Ir. 
and Mrs. Needier have one child of their own, Edith Ethel, the wife 
of Rev. Edward C. Corts, a minister in the Church of 'God at Logans- 
port, and they have a son Adrian. Mr. and Mrs. Needier are members 
of the Church of God, and in politics he is a Prohibitionist. 

Hanfokd R. Miles. The material development of Upland and 
vicinity owes much to the ability of Hanford R. Miles, prominent as a 
general contractor and builder. For twenty jears he has been a resi- 
dent at Upland, and has to his credit a remarkably long list of worthy 
achievements in houses and public buildings, and other successful con- 
tracts. In later years a very important feature of his business has been 
street paving and concrete construction. Examples of his work may be 
seen in the Pennsylvania Railroad freight house at Hartford City, and 
the passenger stations at Converse and Ridgeville. For three entire 
yeai-s, Jlr. Miles was employed altogether by the Pennsylvania Com- 
pany. The number of public schools likewise testify to his energy. Mr. 
Miles is a practical architect, and has drawn more than one hundred 
plans for public buildings, and different kinds of work. He was the 
architect and superintendent of construction of the fine high school at 
Matthews, and stood in the same relation to the handsome Washington 
Street bridge at Marion. 

Hanford R. ililes was born in Blackford county, Indiana, July 2, 
1869. He was educated in the public schools and in Normal College, 
and before his marriage got a wide and thorough experience in the 
different lines of the building trade, and in contracting. He lived in 
Blackford county until 1893, and in that year came to Upland. He had 
already proved successful in carrying out several important contracts, 
and as the business broadened and larger opportunities were presented, 
he determined to prepare himself for the proper handling of these 
larger opportunities. He studied architecture, and for a number of 
years has given close attention to both the professional and practical 
side of his business. He was chosen superintendent of construction in 



602 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

the erection of the Deeren Planing and Lumber Mills at Upland, and 
had the superintendence of operation for seven years. He also drew 
the plans and took an important part in the construction of most of the 
buildings along the business streets of Upland, and successfully carried 
out the contracts for the erection of the handsome group of University 
buildings on the campus of Taylor University. 

Hanford R. IMiles was one of a family of twelve children, nine sons 
and three daughters, all of whom are married and all are living except 
two. The Miles family was established in the northeastern states sev- 
eral generations ago, and General Nelson A. Miles belongs in the same 
family relationship. The founder of this branch was Thomas IMiles, 
who came from England when young, with his step-mother, and a few 
years later took part as a soldier on the American side during the Revo- 
lutionary war. So far as known, his life was spent in the state of New 
Jersey. Grandfather Lorenzo IMiles was born in New Jersey, later 
moved to Western New York, and in 1835 to Indiana, settling first in 
Fayette county, and in 1S3S in Jefferson township of Grant county. 
Lorenzo Miles died in this county, in 1850, when quite old. Hammond 
Miles, son of Lorenzo, was the first child born in Hammond, Steuben 
county, New York, and his birth occurred June 1, 1826. He was nine 
years of age when the family came to Indiana, and about twelve when 
they located in Jefferson township on a farm. He began life as a 
farmer, and acciuired one hundred and fifty acres in Blackford county. 
He finally retired to Hartford City, where he died in 1910. Hammond 
Miles was married in 1849 to Sarah R^mly. Their marriage occurred in 
Grant count}', and she was born in Pennsylvania in 1829, and died 
November 25, 1901. When a child she lost her parents, and was taken 
into the family of Peter Gregory, who became one of the first settlers 
of Blackford county where she was reared and educated. 

All generations of the family, so far as known, have produced loyal 
Democrats, and Hanford R. Miles is one of the ablest men in his party 
in Grant county. He has served his home community as a member of 
the town council, and also on the board of education. In 1892. in Black- 
ford county, he married Miss Luella Johnson, a daughter of Thomas 
and Sai-ah Jane (Rix) Johnson. The Johnsons were old settlers of 
Blackford county, were substantial farming people, and Mrs. Johnson 
died there when her daughter ilrs. IMiles was four years of age. Mr. 
and Mrs. Miles have two children: Leah B., who graduated from the 
Upland high school in the class of 1913, and is now a student of German 
and music in Taylor University ; Doris, who is now a high school student ; 
Dallas, a son, the first child of Mr. and Mrs. Miles, died aged two years. 

Prank Smilet. The leading general mercantile house of Matthews 
was established in that vicinity by Frank Smiley twenty-five years ago, 
and Mr. Smiley has employed the sound principles of commercial integ- 
rity and industry in effecting a result which classifies him among the 
substantial and prosperous citizens of Grant county. He started out 
in the drug business in New Cumberland, now known as "Old Town" 
and is so called to designate the older part of the little city of ilatthews. 
Mr. Smiley moved his enterprise to the new town of Matthews, when 
that village was started in 1891, and here became a general merchant on 
Massachusetts Avenue. His business there has been conducted for more 
than twenty years, and with marked success. In 1910. JMr. Smiley 
moved his establishment to a new location near the corner of Seventh 
Street on Massachusetts Avenue, and there occupies a well arranged 
store, twenty-two by eighty feet in ground dimensions, and his stock 
is always fresh and selected with a view to supplying all the wants of 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 603 

the large and prosperous community about Matthews. Mr. Smiley has 
been one of the leading men in his community for many years and was 
the first postmaster of Matthews, serving a long period in that office. 

Frank Smiley was born in Jefferson township of Grant county, 
August 5, 1861. His parents were Jonas and Lavina (Mullen) Smiley. 
The father, who was born and reared in Darke county, Ohio, was a 
young man when he took up his residence in Grant county, was married 
here, and thereafter followed farming in Jefferson township until his 
death at the age of forty-seven. With farming he combined the trade 
of carpentry, and while during his youth he had no educational advan- 
tages, he was alwaj's regarded and esteemed as a bright and intelligent 
man. He and his wife were Methodists in religion, and his political 
faith was that of the Republican party. His wife was born and reared 
in Grant county, and died at the old home in Jefferson township at the 
age of forty-two. Besides the Matthews merchant the other children 
were : Charles, who is an oil well man, living in Fairmount, and by his 
marriage to Anna Monnahan has one daughter, Lavina; Mattie Grace 
is the widow of Eben Coppick, and has a son Reuben and a daughter 
Ruth. One daughter died in childhood. Frank Smiley was about eight 
years old when his parents died, and he grew up and was educated in 
Jefferson township, started out without capital and all through his own 
efforts has built up a substantial business. He was married in Delaware 
county, this state, to Miss Minnie Millspaugh, who was born in Jeffer- 
son township of Grant county forty-four years ago, but was reared and 
educated in Delaware county. Her parents are William and ilargaret 
J. (Burgess) Millspaugh, both natives of Indiana, reared and married 
in Grant county, and later active farmers in Washington township of 
Delaware county. There her father died in 1906 when sixty-two years 
of age, but Mrs. Millspaugh still occupies the old homestead, and is now 
sixty-three years of age. The Baptist was the faith of the Millspaugh 
family. There were five sons and three daughters, and with the excep- 
tion of one son, all are living, and all are married but one. Mr. and 
Mrs. Smiley are the parents of one son, Russell, who was born January 
19, 1891, and is still getting his education. Mr. and Mrs. Smiley 
are Presbyterians in religion. He is a Republican and for nine years 
gave an efficient administration of the duties of postmaster in Matthews. 

Alvin B. Hoover. A solid business enterprise of Matthews has a 
history of its own, which illustrated both the progress of the town and 
the career of one of its foremost citizens. This business, conducted 
under the name and proprietorship of Alvin B. Hoover, is a complete 
establishment for the supplying of hardware, wall paper, paints, with 
also a plumbing and tinware department, and occupies a storeroom 
forty-two by ninety feet in dimension at the corner of Eighth and 
Massachusetts Avenue. This business represents the steadily progres- 
sive labors of Mr. Hoover, over a number of years. He established a 
business here in March, 1911, and in April, 1913, took over the entire 
stock of the Hayworth Hardware Company, and is now the only dealer 
in general hardware and related supplies in Matthews. His business 
up to a few years ago, was more in a special line as a paper and paint- 
ing contractor and house decorator. As a house decorator his business 
extends all over this section of Grant county, and also into Blackford, 
Madison and Delaware counties. He is himself a practical house painter 
and decorator, and that trade was the basis on which he has built up his 
present prosperous commercial enterprise. 

Mr. Hoover has lived in Grant county sixteen years, and all his life 
has been spent in the vicinity of Matthews. He was born and reared in 



604 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Washington township of Delaware countj^, his birth occurring January 
4, 1868. His native township remained his home until he came to 
Matthews sixteen years ago. His parents were William and Catherine 
(Hoover) Hoover, his mother and father being of the same name, but 
not related. They were both natives of Blair county, Pennsylvania, 
coming of Pennsylvania Dutch stock, and previous to the Revolution 
membei's of the family lived in Virginia. William Hoover when a 
young man moved west to Henry county, Indiana, and there he met and 
married his wife, who came from the same state as he. Sirs. Hoover's 
parents were Peter and Margaret Hoover, and had settled in Henry 
county, improved a good farm, and made that their home until their 
death when past eighty years of age. After four children had been 
born in Henry county, William Hoover and wife came to Washington 
township in Delaware county, and there established a home on eighty 
acres of land. There the parents lived quiet and industrious lives until 
past seventy and in 1905 retired to a comfortable home in IMattliews. 
where both are now living, and are each seventy-eight years of age. and 
hale and hearty. The father belongs to the Progressive Dunkard 
church, while his wife is a member of the Old Church of that order. 
His politics is Republican. 

Alvin B. Hoover was one of a family of six children, named as 
follows: Miles L., who is a merchant at Wheeling, Indiana, and has a 
family; Estella, who is married and lives in Missouri; George W., 
cashier of the Farmers State Bank at Eton; Alvin B. ; Alta, wife of 
Denton Tomilson, of Madison county, and the mother of three children ; 
and Benton, who died at the age of four years. 

Alvin B. Hoover was married in Gaston, to Miss Margaret Barrett, 
who was born in Iowa in 1874, but was reared and educated in Delaware 
county. By her marriage she has become the mother of two children-. 
Twila, who died at the age of two years and tive months ; and Hilda B., 
who is thirteen years of age and attending the public schools. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hoover attend worship in the Methodist Episcopal church, and he 
is in politics a Republican, served seven years in the ofSees of city 
clerk and treasurer, and made a splendid record in administering those 
ofSces. Wlien he went into office the city was burdened with a debt, 
and when he left the treasury had eight thousand dollars. Fraternally 
he is well known in several orders, including the Blue Lodge of Masonry, 
and he occupies the Masonic Building at Matthews as the site of his 
store. He belongs to the Wheeling Encampment of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, has taken all the chairs in the lodge and has also 
been honored with office in the Improved Order of Red Men. 

Hon. Burtney W. Sh.vfer. Over Grant county at large the name 
just mentioned will be most closely associated with the Democratic leader 
and former state senator of Jouesboro, and will recall the fact that 
he was a few years ago the first Democratic candidate who ever suc- 
ceeded in eariying Grant county in the senatorial district comprising 
the trio of counties, Wells, Blackford and Grant. While Mr. Shafer 
did some exceedingly commendable work in the state senate, his career 
is notable not only for his participation in politics, but also as one 
of Jonesboro's substantial business men, and he has long been one of 
the valued factors in local affairs of that city. 

Burtney W. Shafer comes of an old Virginia family. His gi-and- 
father Phillip Shafer was born in Virginia, and was descended from 
a Revolutionary war veteran. Phillip Shafer was married in Rockbridge 
county, Virginia, to Miss Margaret McCorkle, a nati-\'e of that county 
and of the prominent Virginia family of her name. Mrs. Phillip Shafer 




HON. BURTNEY W. SHAFER, WIFE AND DAUGHTER 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 605 

was an aunt of former Governor McCorkle of West Virginia, and she 
was a descendant of Colonel McCorkle, who served with the rank of 
colonel on General Washington's staff during the Revolution. The 
McCorkles were identified with earl3^ Virginia history, and by direct 
right were able to display their coat of arms granted during the residence 
of the family in old England. Phillip Shafer and wife spent most of 
their lives on a farm in Rockford county, but linallj^ moved out west and 
settled at Tarkio, Missouri, where Phillip died when past eighty years 
of age. His wife subsequently returned to her native county in Vir- 
ginia, and died there when about eighty years of age. They were 
Presbyterians in religion and Phillip Shafer, although of old Virginian 
stock, was opposed to the holding of slaves. Of their children, the first 
was William D. Shafer, father of former Senator Shafer; Arthur, who 
died, left three daughters ; John is married and lives in Rockford 
county, Virginia, having a small family. The son Emmett lives some- 
where in the west, and has several children. 

William D. Shafer was born in Virginia in 1847, grew up and 
received his education in that state, and in Rock Bridge county married 
Miss Nancy Ruley. She was born, reared and educated in the same 
county, her birth having occurred in 1846. After their marriage, they 
made their home in Virginia for some years, and in that state were born 
Burtney W., Margaret, Jennie and Esther. In 1884 the family moved 
to Grant county and located in Mill township on a farm. There William 
D. Shafer still lives and all their children were reared in that vicinity. 
The daughter Jennie died after her marriage to Frank B. Bourie, 
leaving children, May and Frank; Margaret married Harry W. Woot- 
ring, who is connected with the rubber works at Jonesboro ; Esther mar- 
ried Professor George Carter, a son of Henry D. Carter, a sketch 
of which family appears elsewhere in this work. Professor George 
Carter is at the head of the department of manual training in the 
schools of Port Arthur, Texas, and they have one daughter, Margaret. 
Mr. Shafer 's first wife, the mother of Senator Shafer, died in the early 
nineties and William D. Shafer in 1898 married Mrs. Lida E. Willson. 

Burtney W. Shafer grew up in a time in which the inspiring 
influence was the mother, a highly educated and cultured woman, who 
afforded her children manj' advantages which schools could not supply. 
The local high school gave him an adequate literaiy training for busi- 
ness purposes, and he early engaged in brick mason work, and sub- 
sequently became a brick contractor, which is his principal business 
at the present time. He also clerked for some time, and has had a 
thorough business experience and as a workman at a trade has a ready 
appreciation of all phases of the labor situation. In recent years, he 
has done a large and successful business in the higher grades of brick 
work, chiefly in decorative and chimney construction. ]Mr. Shafer has 
had his home about Jonesboro ever since 1884, with the exception of 
about eight years, during which he was on the road as a journeyman 
brick mason. 

He was mari-ied in Grant county to Miss Myrtle Allison, who was 
bom in Bartholomew county, Indiana, in 1874, was educated in the 
city of Columbus, Indiana, and to her marriage with Mr. Shafer has 
been born one daughter, Helen Margaret, born November 22, 1902, and 
now attending the Jonesboro city schools. Mrs. Shafer is a member 
of the Methodist church. 

^Ir. Shafer has been one of the working leaders in the Democratic 
party in Grant coi;nty since 1889, has served as delegate to county 
and state conventions, and is regarded as one of the most astute organ- 
izers and managers in this section of the state. In 1906 he consented to 



606 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

become a candidate for the state senate, and as already mentioned was 
the first Democrat elected from this district who ever succeeded in 
carrying Grant county. While in the senate Mr. Shafer was assigned 
to membership on several important committees, but his most con- 
spicuous service was done in the committee on labor, and his part in 
shaping legislation which came from that committee or was referred 
to it, was of such impartial and fair-minded character as to call forth 
the hearty commendation of laboring people all over the state, and was 
also indorsed by the regular press and political organization. Mr. Shafer 
has been appointed postmaster at Jonesboro by President "Wilson. Mr. 
Shafer took his first degrees in ilasonry in Jonesboro Lodge No. 109, 
F. & A. M., in 1890, and is a past master of the lodge and has been 
prominent both in that order and in the Knights of Pythias, which he 
has served as chancellor and for ten years as a member of the Grand 
Lodge. He is also a member of the Charter Lodge of the Order of 
Neptune at Marion. 

Walter C. Keeghler. A very gratifying kind of success has been 
that of Walter C. Keeghler, the proprietor of the well appointed de- 
partment store of Matthews, carrying everything in stock which the 
public wants, from high grade pianos to needles and pins, including dry 
goods, groceries, all kinds of household supplies, queensware, brassware, 
and a full stock of five and ten cents goods, supplying the demands 
of both the country and town trade. Mr. Keeghler possessed a certain 
native ability in trade, otherwise he could hardly have made his record. 
He started out as a clerk, and with the experience and training thus 
acquired, finally borrowed a thousand dollars, and ventured on his own 
account. In a few years he had cleared up his indebtedness, and now 
has one of the best paying mercantile concerns in Grant county. Mr. 
Keeghler has been in business in Matthews since August, 1906, his 
location being at the corner of ^Massachusetts Avenue and Ninth Street. 
His store is forty-fonr by one hundred feet in dimension, and there is 
also a warehouse twenty-two by one hundred feet, while he is owner 
of a vacant lot ad.joining his place of business. Mr. Keeghler also owns 
an attractive residence on Seventh Street, with three and a half lots of 
ground, a combined frame and cement structure, with a stone verandah, 
and all the modern improvements. Mr. Keeghler had several years 
experience as a clerk before starting out on his own account, and during 
that time was employed by his brother in-law, I. E. Powell, a merchant 
then at ilatthcAvs and now at Coffeyville, Kansas. In this way ilr. 
Keeghler learned the details of business, and then by his own efforts 
paid back the first thousand dollars he had borrowed and since that time 
his stock has been free from debt, and he has pi'ospered steadily. 
Walter C. Keeghler was born at Half Acre Corner, in Wabash county, 
Indiana, October 9, 1870. He was reared and educated in and about 
Urbana, and worked at various occupations in several states before 
coming to Matthews in 1899. His parents were Oscar and Maiy J. 
(Richardson) Keeghler. His father was a son of Henry Keeghler, of 
German parentage, and was five yeai-s old when brought to Wabash 
count}', Indiana, by his widowed mother. Oscar Keeghler 's mother died 
in Wabash eount\% and he himself lived there as a farmer, and died 
when still a young man at the age of thirty-two. His widow then 
married Joseph S. Sellers, and they both now reside in Long Beach, 
California. 

Walter C. Keeghler was the only son, and the oldest of the family, 
his sisters being: Myrtle, wife of Mr. Powell of Coffeyville, Kansas, 
and the mother of two daughters ; Drexel and Artemisia : and Clara 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 607 

Fleming, of Long Beach, California, and the mother of two sons, Jamea 
and John. 

ilr. Keeghler was married at Converse, in Miami county, Indiana, 
to j\Iiss Inez N. Ross. She was born in Richland township of Grant 
eouut.y, November 22, 1871, but was reared and educated in Miami 
county, near Converse. To their marriage has been born one daughter, 
Gretchen, on October 28, 1891. Her education was acquired in the city 
high schools, and for several years she has assisted her father as clerk 
in the store. Mr. Keeghler 's family are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. He is one of the vigorous Republicans in his section 
of Grant county, and a worker for good government and local improve- 
ment in every direction. He is also connected with several fraternal 
orders. He is treasurer and trustee of the local Matthews Lodge, 
F. & A. J\I., is affiliated with the Red Men of IMatthews ; belongs to the 
council and chapter of the JMasouic bodies at Hartford City, and has 
affiliations with the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows at Converse. 

"William Miller. A life of quiet effectiveness marked by a record 
of many duties well done, and many responsibilities faithfully fulfilled 
was that of the late William Miller, who died at his home in Matthews, 
January 19, 1913. Outside of his service in the Civil war, where he 
made a record for coolness and bravery, he was never in the conspicu- 
ous activities of abnormal events, but in the faithful and intelligent 
performance of every task allotted to him during his long life, he left 
a record which may well be envied and admired by the generations to 
follow him. 

William Miller was born in Clermont county, Ohio, October 6, 1836, 
and was in his seventy-seventh year when death came to him. His 
parents were Daniel and Mary (Chapman) Miller. His father was a 
native of Ohio, and of German ancestry, and his mother was born in 
Kentucky of English stock. Daniel ililler and wife were married in 
Clermont county, Ohio, and there their careers began and all their 
children were born. About the time the Civil war broke out they moved 
to Indiana, and bought and located on eighty acres of land, located 
two and a half miles south of ]\Iuncie on the Middletown Pike. That 
was their home until 1871. Like many dwellers in the middle states, 
they were attracted by tlie high sounding promises of western lands, 
and moved out to Montgomery county, Kansas, buying a half section 
there. Their residence and activity as farmers in Kansas was brief, 
since the grasshopper scourge and the drought soon compelled them to 
abandon their enterprise and return to a more hopeful country. Thus 
in 1873 they reestablished their homes in Delaware county, and finally 
traded their three hundred and twenty acres of Kansas land for eighty- 
four acres in Washington township of Delaware county. There Daniel 
Miller died M'hen seventy-three years of age. His wife had passed away 
some years previously when sixty-seven years old. They were good 
citizens, prominent workers in the United Brethren church, and Daniel 
Miller during his early manhood was a vigorous supporter of the Whig 
politics, and later equally strong in his advocacy of Republican pi-in- 
ciples. There were eight children. Two of them died in Ohio, four 
died in Indiana, and the two living are : Miss Angle, who is unmarried 
and makes her home with Mrs. Miller at Matthews, and Mary, wife of 
Edward McClelland, of Muncie, and the mother of one son and one 
daughter. 

William Miller, who was the oldest in the family of children, was 
reared in the home of his parents, and lived on the old farm in Clermont 



608 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

county, until the breaking out of the war. Then in May, 1862, he en- 
listed in Company C of the Second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, going in 
as a private and saw nearly three years of active service before his 
honorable discharge. He participated in the second battle of Bull Run, 
and later was in the armies under Sherman and other leaders and 
fought in the battle of Lookout Mountain, and many other engagements 
of the campaign. Much of his military experience was as driver of an 
ammunition wagon, and at the battle of Lookout Mountaiu he had a 
very narrow escape. His wagon in going up an incline road was stalled 
between two trees and was exposed to a crossfire, while the bullets were 
flying fast from both directions, he never flinched and stayed by the 
wagon until an orderly rode up and directed him to cut loose his mules 
and make a hasty escape. After the war he returned and rejoined his 
familj', who in the meantime had taken up their residence in Delaware 
county, Indiana. He remained at home from 1865 until 1867, and in 
the latter year started out for himself and was married. 

Mr. Miller married Sliss IMai'tha Pittser. Mrs. Miller, who survives 
her husband, and enjoys the high esteem of her neighbors in Jefferson 
township, was born in Henry county, Indiana, September 28, 1845, a 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Stewart) Pittser. Both her father 
and mother were born in Brown county, Ohio, but gi-ew up in Henry 
county, where they were married. John Pittser was the son of ilathias 
and Sarah (Jones) Pittser. ^lathias Pittser, who was born in Germany, 
came to America in early life, married in Ohio, and during the decade 
of the twenties, settled as a pioneer in Henry county, Indiana, where 
he entered eighty acres of wild land, direct from the government, and 
many years of his active career were devoted to the development and 
improvement of that estate. It was finally made a good home, and con- 
tinued to be the residence of Mathias and wife until they were both 
about threescore and ten years of age, at which time death came and 
removed them from the scenes of useful work and enjoyment. They 
were ^Methodist Protestants in religion. On her mother's side, Mrs. 
Miller is likewise related to pioneers in Henry county, Indiana, and the 
Stewart family has an ancestry which goes back to Scotland, and to 
the ancient clan of Stuarts, including the noted :\Iary Queen of Scots. 
Mrs. Miller's maternal grandparents, William and ilargaret Stewart, 
built and established a home in Henry county, during the pioneer epoch, 
and lived there until a ripe old age. They were both members of the 
Christian church. 

After their marriage, "William Miller and wife took up their careers 
as farmers, and spent two years iu Kansas, during 1871-73. There they 
experienced a share in the disasters already mentioned, and returned 
with other members of the family to Delaware county. Their home was 
on a farm in Delaware county until 1905, when they retii-ed, and 
selected a home situated on five lots of land at the corner of IMassachu- 
setts Avenue and Fourth Street in the village of Matthews. There Mrs. 
Miller still lives, and she is also owner of the farm of forty-two acres 
in Delaware county, ilrs. I\Iiller is a fine type of the old-fashioned 
woman, a true lady, and possessed of the graces and the courtesies of 
the heart and mind which are so characteristic of the older generation. 

Mrs. Jliller is the mother of the following children: Lillian, who 
died in infancy; Ida, who died ]May 20, 1902. unmarried, and who for 
fifteen years was a successful educator in Delaware county, being a 
graduate of Fairmount Academy and the Terre Haute Normal School. 
Arthur, who was born ilay 13, 1877, was educated in the public schools, 
and in Valparaiso University, now operates his mother's farm in Dela- 
ware countv. Arthur ^liller married iliss Myrtle Carmiu of Delaware 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 609 

county, and, they have four children — Ralph William, "Walter I., Myra 
N., and Helen C. Mrs. Miller and family are members of the Christian 
church, and her husband -svas also a communicant in the same faith. 
His polities was Republican, and his son Arthur follows in the same 
political line. 

RuPHAS C. Nottingham. On section thirty-three of Jefferson town- 
ship, not far from the little city of Matthews, is a tine home and farm, 
and its proprietor, Mr. Nottingham, has a record which in many ways 
identifies him with Grant county, and his interest in the history of this 
locality is due not only to his own long residence, but to the fact that 
his family has lived here since the days of early settlement. 

Ruphas C. Nottingham was born in Jefferson township of Grant 
county, August 29, 1855, so that he himself has lived here nearly sixty 
years. His grandfather, James Nottingham, who was of an old English 
family, and took its name from the Nottingham district in England, 
was a Virginian by birth and was four times married. His first wife 
was Elizabeth Russell, who died in Delaware county, after their settle- 
ment there at an early day. James Nottingham was a cabinet maker 
by trade and had a little shop in the pioneer village of Muncie, Indiana, 
when that town consisted of only a few houses in the woods and in the 
Hazel brush on the banks of White River. Mr. Nottingham and Miss 
Russell were married in Muncie. Later he traded his business to Bing- 
ham Simons for oue hundred and twenty acres of land in Jefferson 
township, of Grant county. Mr. Simons had obtained that land direct 
from the government and had placed some improvements. James Not- 
tingham's first wife died in Muncie, leaving the following children: 
Owen P. ; Julia, who married Simon Clark, aud left nine children ; 
James Chaplain and Ellen, who died in girlhood. By his second wife, 
whom he married in Muncie, James Nottingham had one child, Thomas, 
who died aged about sixty years. James Nottingham then came to 
Grant county and married his third wife, who died without children. 
His fourth marriage was with Mrs. Sarah Litler, whose maiden name 
was Heal. She was a widow with nine children, and by James Notting- 
ham had four other children. James Nottingham and wife spent their 
last years in retirement in Jonesboro in Grant county, where they died 
when seventy-two years of age. They were active Methodists. 

Owen P. Nottingham, father of Ruphas C, was born m Muneietown, 
as the city of Muncie was then called, on October IS, 1832. His prac- 
tical experience in business affairs began when a mere boy. He was 
given a contract to carry the mail, aud on horseback and in all kinds 
of weather, and over all kinds of roads, he rode throughout this part of 
the state, and went through hardships that now seem almost incredible. 
Oftentimes he was on the road and in the saddle all night long in order 
to get his mail to its proper connections. The very fact of his success- 
ful performance of those duties indicate his pluck and energy. He was 
a verj' capable horseman, and his skill in the management of the 
handling of horses enabled him the more easil.v to carry out his work 
as a mail carrier. When nineteen years of age he left the mail service, 
and in 1832 was married in Grant county to Miss Mary Ann Couch, 
who was born in Darke county, Ohio, February 1, 1830, and came to 
Indiana when young with her mother and grandfather, Samuel 
Todd. Her people settled in Jefferson township of Grant, county. 
After his marriage, Owen P. Nottingham started out as a 
farmer in Jefferson township. Previously, however, he had acquired 
the trade of harnessmaker, and followed that occupation for some 
time. In 1863, quiet vocations of civil life were exchanged for 



610 BLACKFOED AND GRANT COUNTIES 

military duties, and he enlisted in the Fifty-fourth Indiana Infantry, 
serving as teamster and wagon master, for fourteen mouths. After his 
return to Grant county, he spent the rest of his years in farming pursuits 
in Jefferson township, and died January 25, 1907. His wife had died 
some years before on October 10, 1883, at the age of fifty-two years. 
She was a noble wife and mother, and both of them were intiuential and 
veiy worthy people, acting as counsellors to the community ou many 
occasions, and Owen Nottingham many times was able to secure peace 
among his neighbors. His politics was Republican. There were ten 
children, six sons and four daughters in the family, and five of the sons 
and four of the daughters are still living. All are married, and all have 
families and homes of their own. 

Ruphas C. Nottingham, who was the second iu number in this large 
family of children, was reared and educated in Jefferson township, and 
has always given his attention to farming. His home is in section thirty- 
three of Jeft'erson to^mship, and comprises a fine fanu estate of one 
hundred and seven acres, one of the conspicuous improvements on which 
is the tine brick house, surrounded with excellent barns and other facil- 
ities which indicate the progressive manner in which jVIt. Nottingham 
carries on his farming operations. Directly across the road, only lying 
in Delaware county, he also owns eighty acres. 

On November 11, 1874, Mr. Nottingham married Miss Ida Kirstead. 
She was born June 1, 1855, near Jackson, Michigan, was reared and 
educated in Indiana, and died March 11, 1889. She was survived by 
one daughter, Florence, the wife of Walter W. Slain, and they now 
live on a farm in Jefferson township, and have two children, Virgil and 
Ormal. Mr. Nottingham, on September 10, 1891, in Jefferson township, 
married for his second wife, Mrs. Lasina Newberger, whose maiden name 
was Richards. Her father is L. G. Richards, a prominent Grant county 
citizen, whose sketch will be found on other pages of this work. jNIrs. 
Nottingham by the first marriage has one son, Clarence Newberger. 
Clarence Newberger was married in Philadelphia to Mrs. Anna Mann, 
and they now live in Richmond, Virginia, and have five children. The 
following children have been born to Mr. and j\Irs. Nottingham : Goldie, 
born November 26, 1891, and now the wife of Clj'de E. Harris, and 
living in iladison county, Indiana : Ray and May, twins, born March 
27, 1895; Ray married Pauline Lambert, and is a farmer in Washing- 
ton township of Delaware county; ]\Iay is the wife of Earl Parkerson, 
of Delaware county; Mary, born September 5, 1898, is at home and 
attending the public schools. Mr. and Mrs. Nottingahm are members 
of the Harmony Primitive Baptist church at ^Matthews. 

The politics of 'Mv. Nottingham is Republican, in which political 
faith he has acted and believed since he cast his first vote during the 
Hayes campaign. 

Elisha Overman. One of the most interesting and best known 
families in Grant county is the Overman family, several generations of 
whom have been identified with the growth and progress of this section 
of the state, and many of whom have done more than the average citizen 
toward the upbuilding and advancement of their communities. 

Elisha Overman, whose name introduces this brief family sketch, 
comes of Pennsylvania ancestry. His grandfather, one Elijah Over- 
man, came from" that state to Ohio in the early days of Clinton county, 
and there he settled upon and improved a farm. He passed the 
remainder of his life there, and when he died he was but little beyond 
middle life. He left four children — Jesse, Benjamin and two daughters 
whose names do not appear in this record. All grew to years of maturity. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 611 

all married and all reared families. All are now deceased. After the 
death of Elijah Overman, his widow married Amos Davis, and they 
came to Grant county and located in Center township. There they 
passed the remainder of their lives on the farm they settled upon, 
Amos Davis being about seventy-one when he passed away, while his 
widow survived him a few years. All were members of the Friends 
church. Mr. Davis was a Whig- and later was a Republican, and was 
always an excellent citizen in his community. He and his wife had 
two children. Henry married and lives on a farm in the vicinity of 
Sweetser, in Grant county, and is without issue. Melissa became the 
wife of Reuben Small and lives in Anthony, Kansas. They have four 
sons. 

Benjamin Overman was born in November, 1814, and died in March, 
1906. When a young- man he came to Grant county and located in 
Franklin township, but he had lived for some years prior to that with 
his mother and step-father in Center township. He was twice married. 
His first wife was a Miss Burson, who died a few years later in Franklin 
township where he settled soon after his marriage. She left him one 
daughter, Melissa, who is now married and who lives in North Marion 
and has two sons. The second wife of Benjamin Overman was Clarissa 
Marshall. She was born in this county and was here reared, for the 
most part, and she died in Franklin township while she was yet a young 
woman, death coming to her in 1857. Thus was Benjamin Overman 
widowed a second time in his young life. She was mother of three 
children — Henry, deceased; Elisha, our subject; and Rile.y. deceased. 

A third time did Benjamin Overman marry, and the woman of his 
choice was a half sister of his second wife. Her name was Rebecca 
Marshall, and she too was a Grant county girl. She died some few 
years after the passing of her husband, her death occun-ing in 1908, 
when she was about fifty-three years of age. She was the mother of the 
following children: Elizabeth, who married Albert Brown and lives 
in Mill to^vnship; they have two children, Delia and Virgil. Dora, the 
wife of Abe Gross, lives in Wabash county; they have three children. 
Mahala, the wife of George Shaw, lives in Mill township, and is the 
mother of seven children. 

Elisha Overman is the son of Benjamin and Clarissa (Marshall) 
Overman, and he was born in Franklin township. Grant county, on 
May 28, 1853. After the death of his young mother in 1857 he lived 
at the home of his Grandfather Davis, and was educated in the common 
schools of that period. When he reached young manhood he married 
in Mill township IMartha Entenninger. who was bom in IMill town- 
ship in 1856 and died at her home in this township in 1886. She was 
the mother of three children. Leland died in infancy. David E. was 
born on November 9, 1884. He now owns and operates his own farm of 
124 acres in Section 27. Mill township, the place being a well improved 
and productive one. He is unmarried and lives at home. William 
died at the age of twelve years. 

]\Ir. Overman was married a second time in White county, Indiana, 
to Miss Minnie ilcGinnis. who was born in Carroll county on December 
29, 1869, near Delphi. She is a daughter of Freeman and Hannah 
(Snethen) McGinnis, natives of Indiana who were engaged in farming 
in White, Carroll and Cass counties in later years of their lives. Late 
in life they took iip their residence in Gas City, and they died in this 
place — the father in 1906. when he was sixty-two years of age, and 
the mother in 1904, at the age of fifty-eight. They were long members 
of the Christian church, both having been baptized at the same time, 
but later in life, as a matter of convenience, they united with the 



612 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Baptist church. They had five children. Willard, a resident of Gas 
City, is married and has a family; Andrew lives in Gas City, and he 
also is married and has six children; ]\Irs. Overman was their third 
child ; Elijah, a resident of Cass county, married and has two daughters ; 
and filary, who died after her marriage as the result of a gas explosion 
at the Soldiers' Home on January 21, 1904. Her husband, Charles O. 
Beitel, was killed at the same time. The explosion caused a falling of 
the walls of the place, and both were crushed in their beds. They left 
two children. Orval C. lives in the home of his aunt, Mrs. Overman, 
and Harry R. lives with Mre. Rose, in Madison count}'. 

The second marriage of ^Ix. Overman was blessed with two children : 
Ethel C, the wife of C. D. Smith, and Roy L., who lives with his sister, 
Mrs. Smith. 

Following Mr. Overman's second marriage, they lived for ten years 
on a farm in Section 28, Mill township, the years from 1889 to 1899 being 
spent there. He then purchased a farm of 182 acres in Section 12, 
Mill township, and this place he has improved to a great extent in the 
years of his residence there. The place is now one of the finest in 
the whole county, and is noted for its bountiful crops of corn and other 
grains, Mr. Overman having demonstrated his capacity as a farmer of 
the finest merit. In 1899, when he took up his residence on the place, 
he built a fine barn, that being the crying need of the place, and in 
1906 he further improved the farm by adding a splendid residence, in 
every way suited to the character and general quality of the farm. 
Here he lived until 1910, when he rented it to his son-in-law, C. D. 
Smith, and he and his wife retired from farm life and settled in Gas 
City, where they built a home on the corner of Fifth and B streets. 

Mrs. Overman is a member of the Bible Students Association and is 
a woman of many excellent qualities of mind and heart. While Mr. 
Overman holds to no settled religious conviction as outlined by church 
doctrine and membership, be is a man of sterling character and one 
whose influence in his community has always been an excellent one. He 
is a Democrat, and at a recent election was elected Councilman-at-large 
for his community. His accomplishments have been most worthy, and 
after a busy career, in which he gained a considerable prosperity, he 
feels himself entitled to a few years of quiet life, in pursuit of those 
enterprises that appeal to his maturer wisdom and judgment. 

Monte Sylvester Dunn. Here is a name that has been identified 
"with Grant county settlement and history for three-quarters of a cen- 
tury. It has become honored and respected, through long years of 
successive industry, business integrity, and Christian and moral char- 
acter. Few Grant county families have been longer established, and 
none have borne their part in community affairs with greater credit to 
themselves and with more practical usefulness to the community than 
the Dunns. Until death laid its restraining finger upon him. the late 
Monte S. Dunn was one of the ablest farmei*s and most public-spirited 
citizens of Jefferson township. His widow, who belongs to the old 
pioneer Littler family, has taken up the burdens laid down by her hus- 
band, and has quietly and effectively performed all the offices required 
of the head of a family. Mrs. Dunn is a woman of fine culture, of the 
essential qualities of heart and mind which are associated with the 
old-fashioned t^-pe of womanhood, and possesses a keen intelligence and 
interest much beyond the usual range of people who spend their lives 
quietly in one community. 

This history of the Dunn family begins with John Dunn, grand- 
father of the late Monte S. Dunn. John Dunn was bom either in 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 613 

Pennsylvania or Virginia, in 1790, and after seventy-five years of life 
passed away at tlie liome of liis son, Tliomas, at New Cumberland in 
Grant county, on June 3, 1865. He was of Scotch-Irisli ancestry. His 
occupation was that of farming, and so far as information is obtainable 
it is believed that he married in Virginia, Miss Cassandra Knight. She 
was a Virginia girl, born in 1795, and died in 1862. For several years 
after their marriage they lived in Virginia, then moved to Ohio, and 
some years later, during the early thirties, established a home in what 
is now Washington to-miship of Delaware county, where John Dunn 
entered one hundred and sixty acres of wild land. He and his wife 
lived and labored there until old age, and were pioneers who succeeded 
in clearing ofiE a considerable part of the wilderness and establishing 
comfortable homes. They were devout members of the Primitive Bap- 
tist faith, and were active in the history of that church in the early 
days, both in Delaware and in Grant county. John Dunn and wife had 
a large family of childi-en, and these are briefly mentioned under the 
following numerical heads: 1. Thomas, who was born in 1812 in Vir- 
ginia or Ohio, in young manhood entered government land, in "Wash- 
ington township of Delaware county, where he lived many years, and 
later established a mill at New Cumberland in Grant county. His 
decLiuing years were spent in Grant county and he died at the old home 
in New Cumberland, October 17, 1881, when past sixty-nine years of 
age. His wife, whose maiden name was Sarah Reasoner, of one of the 
old families of Grant county, died on the same place, July 19, 1891, 
being seventy-six years and four months of age. The children of 
Thomas and wife were : Mrs. Anna Lewis, deceased ; John, who was a 
soldier in the Union army, and now lives in Mississippi; Mary, wife of 
Esley Stephenson, of Matthews; Benjamin R., who was killed at the 
battle of Chickamauga during the Civil war at the age of twenty-one; 
and Gehiel, who died unmarried at the age of twenty-one; Sarah J., 
wife of Richardson Watson, lives in Santa Paula, Califoimia ; Car- 
olina, wife of James Littler, both of whom died without issue; Mrs. 
Samantha, wife of ilonroe Darton, of Delaware county, and the parents 
of one son; Thomas J., who was a miller by occupation and died leav- 
ing one son. 2. James Dunn, father of the late Monte S., was born 
pi-obably in Virginia in 1814, and died in 1863. He married Cassandra 
Evans, "who was born in 1824, and died in 1903. Further details con- 
cerning these parents are given in a following paragraph. 3. William, 
who was born either in Virginia or Ohio, was married on the line be- 
tween Blackford and Grant county to Sebra R«asoner, followed farming 
in Delaware county, until his death, and had seven children. 4. Har- 
mon, who like the others adopted farming as his vocation, was also 
skilled in mechanical pursuits, and in early life followed wagonmaking. 
He spent practically all his life in Delaware county, where he had 
acquired land direct from the government, and at his death left a fam- 
ily of children. 5. Sarah, married Benjamin Lewis, a Delaware county 
farmer, and lived and died on the old place without .children. 6. Mary, 
became the wife of Benjamin Reasoner, a well known farmer of Grant 
county, and they left several children. 7. John, the youngest of the 
family, was a successful Delaware county farmer, where he died, 
leaving five children. 

James Dunn, who was born October 12, 1814, and who died at his 
home on section four of Jefferson township in Grant count.v in 1863, 
was quite young when he first came to Grant county, and was a partic- 
ipant in the early development and history of his township, where he 
started his career as a farmer. After his marriage in 1847, he entered 
land and established his home at what is known now as the Dunn Home- 



614 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

stead, and having been originally entered by his father, John Dunn, 
about 1838. Mr. Dunu was a man of vigorous personality and in the 
course of his lifetime, although he died when in the prime of his years, 
made many improvements to his farm, and made his intluence felt for 
good in the entire community. His place was improved in various 
ways, good barns were erected and a fine old frame house was the home 
in which he passed his last years. In 1817, James Dunn married Cas- 
sandra Evans, who was born in Allegany county, Pennsylvania, June 
15, 1824, and died at the homestead, February 16, 1903. Her father 
was Thomas Evans. She joined the Presbyterian church on January 
30, 1871, and died in that faith. She was a noble, whole-hearted woman, 
ever ready to assist in the troubles of her neighbors, and by her benev- 
olent activities and her kindly personal character was beloved through- 
out the entire country side. The children of James Dunn and wife 
were as follows : Randolph, who died in young manhood ; Almira Jane, 
who died also when young; Oliver Pen\y, who lives on and operates a 
large farm in Delaware county, is married, but has no children living; 
Monte S., who is next in order of the children; and Sarah P., a twin 
sister of Monte and the wife of A. T. Wright, of Marion, and the mother 
of three daughters and one son. 

The late ilonte Sylvester Dunn was born on the farm he occupied 
all his life in Jefferson township, on March 10, 1857, and died at the 
Dunn Homestead, as it is familiarly known throughout Jefferson town- 
ship, April 23, 1913. Reared on the old place he had an education like 
that supplied most farmer boys in his generation, and after growing 
up came into the possession of the farm of one hundred and tifty-six 
acres, where he and his brothers and sistei's had grown up. His was 
a very active life. He was a man of excellent judgment, and his indus- 
try- and good management resulted in the addition of many improve- 
ments, besides those introduced by his father. He left a beautiful and 
valuable home for his widow and children. The old dwelling is a com- 
fortable ten-room house, mostly of frame construction, and beyond the 
house yard are a group of outbuildings, comprising red barns and other 
structures, required for up-to-date farming. As a farmer and stock 
raiser, the late Monte S. Dunn was probably as successful and as pro- 
gressive as any man in his township. His widow and her sons are still 
keeping up the standards set by the late J\Ir. Dunn, and have been no 
less successful in making the homestead pay regular annual dividends. 

On April 26, 1888, in Hartford City, Indiana, Monte Sylvester 
Dunn and Miss Mary E. Littler were united in the holy bonds of matri- 
mony by Rev. McKean, then an old and beloved Presbyterian minister. 
She was born in Jefferson township, of Grant county, September 13, 
1858, was liberally educated in the public schools, and was well prepared 
both by native character and by her early influences for the career of 
motherhood and social beneficence, which has been hers. Her parents 
were Nathan and Katherine (Whistler) Littler. Her father was born 
in Virginia, and her mother in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania. 
They met and married in Ohio, and their companionship as man and 
wife was begun on the banks of the Mississinewa river in Jefferson 
township of Grant county. Their first home was built of logs, and in 
spite of the crudities and hardships of such existence, they had the 
courage and true wisdom of patience which made those yeare not un- 
happy. Later they established a better home, and lived quiet and useful 
lives. Mr. Littler died there during the Civil war in 1863, being then 
in the prime of Life, and his widow followed him in 1870. They were 
active Methodists in religion, and Nathan Littler took much part in 
church work, being possessed of a naturally beautiful voice, which he 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 615 

cultivated, and which he used in church and social affairs. He was also 
a great reader of religious and secular literature. ]\Irs. Dunn has one 
brother living, Joseph W. Littler, who now owns and runs the old 
Littler homestead in Jefferson township. Joseph Littler married 
Elizabeth Dunn, a daughter of Harmon Dunn, and they have four 
daughters. The two sons of Mrs. Dunn are : Phillip, born May 18, 
1890, was graduated from the Matthews high school as one of a class 
of ten in 1909, and after taking a course in animal husbandry at Purdue 
University, has applied his practical experience and scientific training 
to the management of the home farm, being a very successful young 
agriculturist. James Homer Dunn, who was born July 13, 1896, is a 
member of the class of 1915 in the Matthews high school. Mrs. Dunn 
and her two sons are members of the Epworth Methodist church at 
Matthews. 

George Frederick Slater. During the past quarter of a century 
it would not have been possible to estimate the sum total of Jefferson 
township enterprise without reference to the name of George Fred 
Slater, a man who has made farming a i-eal business. He is one of the 
large land owners of the county and has been successful through the 
same qualities which brings prosperity to residence or factory owner. 
Beside the possession of a splendid homestead in section twenty-seven 
of Jefferson county, and land in other localities, Mr. Slater is vice 
president of the Matthews State Bank, having held that office since the 
reorganization of the bank three years ago. A further evidence of his 
standing in the community as a citizen is indicated by his service of 
five yeai;s in the office of township trustee from 1896 to 1901. The 
Slater farm in Jefferson township is well within the gas and oil belt, 
and has been the scene of much productive operation. During the past, 
six gas wells and twenty -one oil holes have been sunk on the Slater farm, 
and in only a few instances did they prove dry, and some of these wells 
are still producing. 

Mr. Slater's grandfather, James Slater, was born in Guernsey 
county, Ohio, about 1800. His death occurred in Henry county, 
Illinois, in 1893 or 1894. His ancestry was about three parts of English 
to one part of German. All his active years were spent in farming, and 
he had moved to Illinois about the close of the Civil war. He was twice 
married, and his first wife having died in Ohio before 1840, and his 
second wife, who became his wife in Ohio, died in Illinois. There Avere 
children by both wives. By the first union the children were : William ; 
John ; and Benjamin, who died unmarried, while John was married and 
reared a large family of ten children, both he and his wife having 
passed away in Henry county, Illinois. 

William Slater, father of the Grant county farmer and business 
man, was born in Guernsey county, Ohio, in 1834. When a small child 
he lost his mother, and then lived on the farm with his father and step- 
mother in Ohio until he became of age. He received what was in that 
time a liberal education, and for his practical career learned the trade 
of carpenter, a vocation which he followed for several years. At the 
age of twenty-three he married Miss Mary T. Marks, who was of English 
ancestry, and a native of old Virginia. Her parents having been born 
in Loudoun county, in that state. Mrs. William Slater was born in 1834 
and accompanied her parents to Ohio in 1840, locating in Guernsey 
county, where her father died when about sixty years of age, and her 
mother at the age of seventy-six. There were twelve children in the 
Marks family, ten of whom grew up and most of them married, all 
being deceased. In 1852, William Slater and wife came to Indiana, 



616 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

where he bought an almost new farm on section twenty-seven of Jeffer- 
son township. In the meantime, however, a daughter, Hannah, had 
been born to them, but she died in infancy and another child, James 
Mason, died as a boy. On the quarter section of laud which he acquired 
in Jefferson township, he made many improvements. A large barn ap- 
peared in 1S61, and three years later was followed by the erection of a 
substantial residence, and these were only the moi-e conspicuous among 
a number of improvements which made the Slater fai'm one of the best 
in that section. "William Slater was a very prosperous man and besides 
the homestead he owned one hundi-ed and twenty acres in one place 
and two hundred and ten acres including a part of the site of the city 
of Matthews. The death of William Slater occurred on the old farm in 
January, 1875. He was a Republican in politics, and he and his wife, 
who died in December, 1879, were active members in the ilethodist 
Episcopal church. Of their six children, four are living and all are 
married. 

George Frederick Slater was born in Jefferson township August 20, 
186-1, and was reared to manhood in the locality which has always been 
his home. Like his father, he had more than ordinary advantages in 
preparation for life, and besides a public school course, he studied in 
Danville College, and later, in 1886, was a student in Bryant and Strat- 
ton's Business College, Indianapolis. A few years of bis early manhood 
were spent in teaching school, but farming has been his regular vocation 
for upwards of thirty years. 

In 1886 ilr. Slater took over the old homestead, and is now owner 
of two hundred and eighty acres of land in section twenty-seven, besides 
one hundred and twenty acres in Delaware county, that place being 
improved with fine large barns, and a very valuable estate in itself. 
General farming and stock raising have been the avenues through which 
Mr. Slater has prospered, and he has always been careful to keep up 
his grades of stock at high standard, and has profited accordingly. He 
raises and feeds a large number of hogs, cattle and fine sheep, and grows 
practically all the grain cereals. 

Mr. Slater was married in Blackford county to Miss Joanna Cora 
Atkinson, who was born in Licking township of that county in 1865, 
and had a public school education. Her parents, Addison and Har- 
riet (McVicker) Atkinson now live retired in Blackford county, where 
they were among the earlier settlers, her father being seventy years of 
age, and her mother one year older. Mr. and ilrs. Slater have the 
following children: William A., who is a farmer in Washington town- 
ship in Delaware county, married Etha Linder, and has two children, 
]\Iartha and George ; Frank is a farmer on one of his father's farms, and 
by his marriage to Hazel Wills has a daughter. Bertha; Eva M., who 
lives at home is a graduate of the local high school, as were her two 
brothers, their school advantages having also been supplemented by 
business college courses; Maiy died at the age of one year; and^^Mar- 
garet. the youngest, is now in the grade schools. Mr. and J\Irs. Slater 
and family worship in the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he is 
a trustee and steward. In politics he supports the Republican party. 

William C. Walker. A citizen who was known and esteemed for 
his many substantial virtues and his success as a fanner and carpenter 
was the" late William C. AYalker, who was born in Jefferson township 
of Grant county, October 29, 1814, and who died at his homestead in 
section thirty-four of the same township on October 7, 1907. Since his 
death Mrs. Sarah Walker, his widow, has owned and controlled the fine 
farm of seventy acres one mile north of the little city of Matthews, and 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 617 

has continued to enjoy the esteem which is paid to her both for her own 
gracious personality and for the part which her late husband played in 
this community. 

^Yilliam C. Walker was a son of John Walker, whose birth occurred 
in Rock Bridge county, Virginia, and in young manhood moved to 
Ohio, where he was a substantial young farmer at the time of his mar- 
riage to Marion Case. She was born in Ohio, and of Irish parentage, 
while the Walkers of Scotch-Irish stock. After some of their children 
were born in Ohio, John Walker and wife moved to Jefferson township 
in Grant county. They were here among the early settlers, and the 
father undertook to clear up his land in the wooded section, but died 
in ISH, when his son William was but six months old. His widow sub- 
sequently married Jesse Ballenger, and they reared a family of children 
and spent their final years apart, he dying in Grant county and she in 
Delaware county, when past seventy years of age. Of the children 
besides William, the following are given brief mention : Samuel, who 
died at Upland, Indiana, after a career as a farmer, and whose widow 
and daughter and son live in Upland ; Mary, now deceased, whose hus- 
band was William Simons, a retired farmer in Fairmont; Katherine, 
now deceased, was the wife of James Needier, also deceased, and they 
left three sons and four daughters; Slargaret is the widow of Amos 
Pugh, and lives in Jefferson township on a farm, but has no living 
children. 

The late William C. Walker was only three years old when he went 
to live with his Aunt Jane, wife of Joseph Reasoner. His home was 
with that worthy couple until he was about seventeen years old, and in 
the meantime he Avas given such advantages in the local school as most 
boys of his time receive. Soon after the outbreak of the Rebellion, he 
enlisted in the Eighth Indiana Infantry, and saw three years of hard 
military service, only excepting a few months in which he was on an 
invalid's furlough, after drinking some poisoned spring water in Mis- 
souri. He was never hit with a bullet or captured, though one ball 
passed through his hat. On his return from the Civil war he remained 
on the farm of his uncle until his marriage. 

In 1865 Mr. Walker married Mrs. Sarah Forsythe, whose maiden 
name was Graham. Mrs. Walker was born in Mercer county, Illinois, 
October 10, 1840. A year or so later her mother died in that state at 
the birth of twins, and John Graham, her father, in 1843, moved to 
Indiana, and lived in Grant county until 1846. He then took his chil- 
dren back to Illinois, and a few years later went to Wisconsin, which 
remained his home until 1860. In the meantime he had married a 
Mrs. Mary McMichael. In 1860 he once more came to Grant 
county for the purpose of securing treatment for cancer, and died at 
New Cumberland in the same year, at the age of seventy-six. He was 
three times married, and by each wife had children, he having been the 
father of sixteen. He also raised two orphans, having raised in all 
eighteen children. 

Mrs. Walker first married Elijah Forsythe who died in the prime 
of life. He had gone to the front as a soldier in Company C of the 
Eighteenth Wisconsin Regiment of Infantry as a private and served 
faithfully as a soldier up to and including the battle of Shiloh. In that 
historic conflict he fought all day long in the rain without any food, 
and as a result he was taken ill and furloughed home, liut died while 
on the way in a soldier's hospital at Keokuk, Iowa. He was buried at 
Keokuk, and his remains now rest in the soldier's cemetery at that 
city. I\Ir. Forsythe was of a good family, of Scotch stock, belonging 
to the old seceder faith, and most of the male members were men of 



€18 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

wealth or at least more thau ordinary circumstance. Elijah Forsythe 
was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, in 1849. At his death he' left 
one daughter that died in infancy. Mrs. Walker by her marriage to 
the late Mr. Walker had two daughters: Blanche, who is unmarried, 
is a young woman of splendid education and lives at home with her 
mother; Jennie, who is also well educated and was for some time a 
teacher, is the wife of Alvin Dickerson of Upland, and has two chil- 
dren, Cloyd and Geneva; Cloyd Dickerson is noAV a student in Purdue 
University, and his sister is a graduate of the Upland high school, and 
is now a student of music at IMarion. ilrs. "Walker has a foster son, 
Christian Ed. Walker, a noted tenor singer, with an established repu- 
tation in musical circles in Chicago. In April, 1913, he married Jennie 
Dancy. Mrs. Walker and family are members of the Presbvterian 
faith. 

Henry Wise comes of a sturdy old Pennsylvania family, of German 
ancestry, and one that has through many generations furnished stanch 
and true men to the affairs of the nation. The Wise family was estab- 
lished in Pennsylvania, in Center county, prior to the Revolutionary 
war, and from then down to the present day men of the name have filled 
worthy places in their proper niches in life. The names of the grand- 
parents of Henry Wise are not now known to him, but he does know 
that they were born, reared and died in Center county, and that his 
grandsire was a blacksmith of unusual ability and merit, and that in 
his day he made many of the farm implements used by the sturdy Ger- 
man farmers of his region. Mr. Wise has in his possession a pair of nail 
nippers, interesting in their appearance, showing as they do their hand 
made origin, and valuable to him as having been made by his grandfather 
at his forge. The old stock were of the German Lutheran faith, and 
stanch religionists in every generation. 

Samuel Wise, son of the blacksmith and the father of Henry Wise, 
whose name heads this review, was born in Center county in about 
1812. He grew up in his native community and early learned the trade 
of a carpenter. When a young man he determined to come west, 
believing that greater opportunities lay in store for the ambitious yomig 
adventurer, and he walked the entire distance to Canton, Ohio, where 
he secured work at his trade at fifty cents per day. Later he advanced 
to the prosperous state where he was paid seventy-five cents a day for 
his labors, and was considered a high priced man at that figure in those 
early days. After a season he returned to Pennsylvania and there 
worked at his trade in his native state. He was an expert cabinet maker, 
and he was occupied in that work and in coffin making, as well as in 
making furniture. He enjoyed a busy trade in that work, and it is a 
notable fact that certain articles of furniture that came from his hands 
are now in the possession of his son. 

]\Ir. Wise married in Center county, Pennsylvania, Miss Katherine, 
or Kate, as she was familiarly called, the daughter of a Mr. Biekel, 
a girl who was born and reared in Center county of good old Penn- 
sylvania stock. It was not until after the birth of their three sons, 
John Jacob, Henry and Samuel, that the family came to Grant county. 
That event took place in the year 1848, and they came all the long 
distance with oxteams, and in coming came in contact with only two 
railroads. They made their first settlement in Jefferson county, there 
purchasing 160" acres of wild land, whose only sign of civilization was 
presented in a deserted log cabin. Here they devoted themselves to the 
business of farming in genuine earnest, and the parents lived to see 
more than 100 acres of this wilderness well improved and in a fertile 




]\m. AND MRS. HENRY AVLSE 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 619 

and blooming condition. It was, in truth, a fine farm, and there Samuel 
Wise and his wife lived for many years, later retiring, and both died 
at the home of their son, Jacob Wise, a sketch of whom will be found 
elsewhere in this work. The father was then ninety years of age, and 
his widow died a few years afterward, she too being well advanced in 
years. They never faltered in their allegiance to the German Lutheran 
church, despite the fact that there were in those days no other churches 
of that denomination in their new home. The father was a Democrat 
and a splendid type of citizen. 

Heni-y Wise is the only surviving one of the four sons born to his 
parents. Jacob, it should be said, is referred to fully in a sketch devoted 
to him, so that further mention is not necessary here. John died in 
Jefferson township, leaving a family, all of whom have since followed 
him. Samuel, the youngest of the family, was drafted into the army 
during the Civil war, but before his company reached the front he 
fell ill and died. He was unmarried. 

Henry Wise was born in Center county, Pennsylvania, on March 
25, 1835, and he was thirteen years of age when he came with his 
parents to Grant county. He was reai'ed on his father's farm and had 
such schooling as the subscription schools of the day provided, in a log 
school house of the most primitive type. The puncheon floor, the 
rude bench, and the improvised writing desk made by resting rough 
boards on pins projecting from the log walls of the building, all were 
common to his day, and such training as went with the rough equipment 
was considered ample for the boy of that early period. 

When Mr. Wise became of age he worked for his father on the 
home farm for three years, receiving for his services $100 yearly. 
After he had taken out $25 for what he called his "Sunday" clothes, 
he loaned the remainder to his father at five per cent per annum, and 
when his brother Samuel became of age a year or so later, they joined 
forces in the purchase of a horse power threshing machine. Together 
the young men each threshing season would traverse the country there- 
about, threshing for those small farmers and others who did not feel 
able to maintain a machine of their own. The money they made in this 
way the j^oung men invested in an eighty acre farm in Jefferson town- 
ship, which they operated in connection with the home farm for some 
years. During the Civil war period they purchased and established the 
first portable saw mill in Grant county. After eighteen months of 
operation they sold the mill for $1,500 more than it had cost them. 
Later they emploj'ed substitutes to take their place in the army, the 
death of young Samuel before he reached the front having disheartened 
them for any similar service. 

It was about then that Henry Wise began to farm on his own 
account. His first operations were in Jefferson township, but in 1869 
he came to MiU to'S'STaship and here purchased 150 acres, partly improved, 
to which he later added 73 acres. Still later he purchased an additional 
30 acres, and this total of 250 acres is now well drained and improved, 
and is held to be one of the best farms in the township. A fine house, 
commodious and complete, as well as a splendid barn, are in evidence, 
and the conditions existing about the place reflect the energetic and 
progressive spirit of the man. 

Mr. Wise has raised a quantity of fine shorthorn cattle and Poland 
China hogs on the place, and his success as a breeder has been excellent. 

In 1905 his success had reached a place where he felt able to retire 
from active business, and he purchased a fine house on North A and 
Sixth streets in Gas City. Here he lives quietly after a strenuous, but 
prosperous career. 



620 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Mr. Wise was married in Jefferson township to Miss Margaret Simons, 
who was born there on April 1, 1861. She is a daughter of William 
and Mary (Walker) Simons, old settlers of Jefferson township. There 
Mrs. Simons died when past middle life and Mr. Simons resides in 
Summitville, Madison county, Indiana. Mrs. Wise is a Presbyterian 
in her religious faith. 

Three children have blessed the lives of Mr. and ilrs. Wise. Lillian, 
the wife of Walter Vance, occupies the home farm with her husband; 
they have no issue. Chestie is the wife of Chester Carter, and they now 
live in Marion, Indiana. They have two daughtei-s, Irene and Dorothy, 
Gladys married Frank j\Iorrow, and they live at Fort Wayne, Indiana, 
where he is an overseer in a large factory of that cit}\ They have 
no children. 

Leander N. j\Iillspaugh. Those who pass along the roads of Jeffer- 
son township are sure to comment with favor upon the attractive 
residence and farm of Leander N. Millspaugh, located in section six 
and on rural route No. 2 out of Gaston. The fences and the cultivation 
of the fields are an indication to the practical farmer that an energetic 
and businesslike farmer lives on that place, and the comfortable white 
dwelling house in the midst of fruit trees and the shade trees, and the 
large red barn and other buildings, also indicate thrift and prosperity. 
Prosperity has come to Mr. and Mrs. ilillspaugh as a result of hard 
labor and close management, and while prospering themselves they 
have not been unmindful of the needs of the unfortunate and have 
borne a helpful share in community activities. 

The ]\Iillspaugh family have a number of representatives in Grant 
and Delaware counties. Grandfather James Millspaugh, according 
to all information available, was born and spent all his life in New 
York state and was a farmer. Of his children one daughter was Sallie, 
who married a Mr. Clark, and their home was near Cincinnati, Ohio. 
The son Gilbert C. Millspaugh, the father of Leander N., was born in 
New York state in 1806. The ancestry of the jMillspaugh is German. 
Gilbert Millspaugh Avas reared on a farm and when a young man 
settled in Faj-ette county, Indiana, among the pioneers. In that 
county he was married to ]\Iiss Lucy Williams who was born prob- 
ably in southern Indiana, about 1812. After their marriage thejy lived 
on a farm in Fayette county where their seven sons and one daugh 
ter were all born. This family of children are described as fol- 
lows: Harvey, who was a carpenter by trade and died in Fayette 
county, leaving a family of children; Oliver II., who, after a long 
career as a carpenter and farmer is now living retired in California, 
was three times married and had children by his two wives ; William, 
who was a veteran of the Thirty-Sixth Indiana Regiment, and was 
for a time a prisoner of war, was a farmer until his death in Washington 
township of Delaware county; Peter, who was a skilled workman 
and successful carpenter and builder, lived and died in Jefferson town- 
ship of Grant county, and by two marriages left two sons and some 
daughters ; Catherine married Daniel Richards, a farmer of Delaware 
county, and there are two sons and a daughter still living of their 
union; Leander N; IMilton J., who has a large family of children by 
two marriages, now lives on his farm near ]\Iarion in North Dakota. 

The birth of Leander N. Millspaugh occurred in Fayette county, 
Indiana, January 8. 1847. There he was reared until 1860, and in 
that year the family moved to Delaware county. His father died in 
Delaware county in 1861 at the age of fifty-six, and when the mother 
was a second time married, Leander, though still but a boy in years, 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 621 

set out to make his own way, and soon afterwards came to Grant 
county. The second husband of his mother was William Hollis. Mr. 
Millspaugh's mother died in Grant county when threescore years of 
age. "With a common school education, acquired in the country school, 
Leander ilillspaugh got his practical training for life on a farm, 
and has made a pro.sperous business out of tilling the soil. Ilis beauti- 
ful farm of eighty acres is in section six of Jefferson township, and he 
and his wife have lived there since their marriage. It was inherited 
by ]\Irs. Slillspaugh from her mother. They not only have a good 
farm but a comfortable nine-room residence and good barns and other 
facilities for successful farming, and the growing of livestock is one 
of the chief industries of the Millspaugh place. 

Mr. J\Iillspaugh was married in Jeft'erson township February 16, 
1871, to jMiss Sarah E. Burgess, who Avas born in Fayette county, 
Indiana, March 28, 1850. She was partly reared and educated in her 
native county, and partly in Grant county, and she finished her educa- 
tion in the Delaware county public schools. Her father, Israel Burgess, 
was born in Indiana about 1822 and was married in Fayette county 
to Ruth Crawford, who was born in Fayette county, Jlarch 9, 1821. 
Israel Burgess was a farmer by occupation and died in Fayette county 
in 18.51. His widow was married February 17, 18.57, to John D. Kirk- 
wood, of Fayette county. Mr. Kirkwood was born October 29, 1826, 
and in 1S62 established his home in Grant count.y, locating on a farm 
of eighty acres in section six of Jefferson township. The Kirkwood 
farm was later increased by the addition of eighty acres more, and 
there on what is known as Kirkwood Creek, he and his wife passed the 
rest of their years. She died December 14, 1902. Mr. Kirkwood died 
on the old homestead in May, 1905. John Kirkwood was a Democrat 
in politics, and he and his wife held to no church creed, although they 
were excellent people, both morally and as citizens, were hard workers, 
and were charitable in all their relations. John D. Kirkwood and 
wife had two sons, Frank H. Kirkwood, whose family history is given 
elsewhere in this publication, and Brooks, who died and left one son. 

Mrs. Millspaugh was the younger of two daughters. Her sister, 
Margaret J., is the widow of William Millspaugh, a brother of Leander, 
who died in Delaware county in I\Iarch, 1903, and his widow now 
occupies the old farm in Washington township. ]\Irs. William Mills- 
paugh has a family of eight children, four sons and four daughters, 
all of whom are living and all married but one. As already stated, 
William Millspaugh was a veteran of the Civil war 

Leander N. ilillspaugh and wife had two children : Orla Corwin, who 
was boi-n in Grant county, January 9, 1874, is a carpenter by trade, his 
home being in Anderson, Indiana. He married Ola Beck, who died, 
leaving three children, Willard L., Mildred A., and Gar H. Orla C. 
Millspaugh married for his second wife, Virginia B. Scott, and their 
children are Everett and George A. Arthur Floyd Millspaugh, the 
second child was born November 15, 1882, and is a carpenter by trade, 
and resides six miles from Rennsalaer, in Jasper county, Indiana. He 
married Fleet Beck, and they have one daughter, Evelyn R. Mr. 
Millspaugh votes the Democratic ticket, and is always ready to enlist 
his services in behalf of any undertaking for the general good of 
his community. 

David Lemon Richards. Probably the most attractive and valuable 
country estate in Jefferson township is that of David L. Richards in 
section six. Prosperity, comfort, enterprise and good management 
are in evidence at every turn, and if one should wish to form a fair 



622 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

judgment as to the highest possibilities of Grant county agriculture, 
he could select no better place for his studies than the Richards farm. 
The farm comprises one hundred and sixty acres of land and has been 
known as the Richards place for two generations. The farm was 
located and owned for a number of years by ilr. L. G. Richards, father 
of David L. Richards. Mr. Richards likewise owns one hundred and 
fifty acres of land in Jefferson township of Delaware county. That 
place has fifteen acres of timber, but all the rest is in cultivation, and 
has an excellent building equipment consisting of a comfortable white 
house and a large red barn. The home farm has a residence probably 
not excelled for size and comfort in this part of Indiana. It contains 
fifteen rooms, the entire structure is modern in architecture and 
furnishings, and it is heated by a furnace, has hot and cold water on 
all floors, and an acetj'leue gas plant in the basement which furnishes 
modern lighting facilities. Outside of the house, which is surrounded 
by a grove of fruit and shade trees, there are two large red barns, 
one of them for stock purposes and the other a seed and grain barn. 
Mr. Richards has specialized both in livestock and in fruits. His home 
has been there since 1900 and though not all the improvements are to 
be credited to his management, he has introduced many changes both 
in the cultivation and in the facilities, and realizing his responsibilities 
as the son of one of the best known old settlers of Grant county, he 
has maintained the family traditions and has developed a farm which 
is creditable alike to his own enterprise and to the county in which 
it is situated. He is successful in the growing of both small and large 
grains, and he keeps a large number of hogs, sheep and cattle, and also 
twelve good horses. 

Mr. L. G. Richards, father of this substantial farmer citizen, has 
a long and interesting career of his own, and it is told in appropriate 
manner on other pages. On the old homestead in section six of Jeffer- 
son township, and in a house which is still kept standing as a land- 
mark and for its family associations, David L. Richards was born April 
16, 1870, and was reared and educated in this vicinity and has been 
known to the people from their youth up. He was one of a family of 
four children, and the others are: Rev. J. W. Richards, a farmer in 
Delaware county, and who was married and has a family ; Mrs. Ruphas 
C. Nottingham ;" and Mrs. J. W. Himelick. 

David L. Richards was married in Jefferson township to Miss Lois 
Alta Fergus, a daughter of Warren Fergus. Mrs. Richards was bom 
on the old Fergus farm in Jeft'erson township, April 10, 1869, and was 
educated in the public schools of this vicinity. To their marriage have 
been born two children, as follows : Delia, born May 15, 1892, a gradu- 
ate of the ^Matthews high school in the class of 1910, and by her mar- 
riage to AVilliam Lewis, who now operates the Richards farm in Dela- 
ware county, has one sou, Richard R., born March .31, 1913. Ada 
Gulia, the second child was born ]May 19, 1896, and is a senior in the 
Matthews high school. Among his other interests and enterprises, 
Mr. Richards was one of the organizers of the ^ilatthews State Bank, 
and is a stockholder and director in that substantial institution. He 
has always interested himself in matters of community welfare, is a 
public-spirited citizen and a supporter of moral and educational move- 
ments. 

Is.\AC Ltm.\n Carter. Five years after the organization of Grant 
county as a separate civil government of Indiana, the Carter family 
was planted in the wilderness along the Mississinewa in Jefferson town- 
ship. Nearly eighty years have elapsed since they came to this region. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 623 

and three generations, comprising many individuals have performed 
their duties and upheld their responsibilities as citizens and members 
of families, and the name has always been associated with honest worth 
and upright manhood and womanhood. 

IMore than a century and a half ago, this family had its seat in 
New Ilampshire. A few years before the Revolutionary War, Edward, 
the great-grandfather of Isaac Lyman Carter was born in Hollis, New 
Hampshire, April 22, 1770. He married Esther Powers, of the same 
place, and they lived and died there, Edward passing away September 
18, 1826. There were a number of children in the family, including 
Isaac P. Carter, who was born in New Hampshire, probably at Hollis, 
July 3, 1793. The early youth was spent in New Hampshire, but he 
was probably married in AValdo county, Maine, where it is known that 
he lived for several years. In an early day, about the year 1825, he 
emigrated west to Ohio, lauding in Muskingum county, Ohio, where 
he was a pioneer settler in the vicinity of Zanesville. There he fol- 
lowed farming, but in a few years his pioneer spirit led him to move 
on still farther west and in 1835 he arrived in Grant county, Indiana, 
locating on raw land in Jefferson township, situated on the banks of 
the Mississiuewa. A log cabin home was the first shelter of the Carter 
family in Grant county, and Grandfather Isaac made a living partly 
by farming and partly by hunting and fishing. His labors were 
steadily directed towards the clearing and improvement of his land, 
and eventually a good homestead rewarded his efforts. For the con- 
struction of the second home replacing the old log cabin, a supply of 
brick was made, and from clay taken from the farm. That old brick 
house is still standing, but is no longer occupied as a dwelling. Isaac 
P. Carter spent his last years in that home, and died January 29, 1869. 
During his residence in Ohio he married Joanna Gage, and she was 
born June 9, 1802, in Waldo county, ilaine, and died April 1, 1863. 
They were active members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
possessed the kindly and substantial qualities of the old pioneer. 
Their family consisted of ten sons, and seven of those grew up and 
were married, as follows: Ira J., Howard, Joseph, Elijah, John H., 
Lewis, and Oliver, all of whom were married and are now deceased, 
and all but Oliver had children. Farming was their vocation, and very 
few members of the Carter family in the various generations have 
followed any other vocation. 

Ira J. Carter, father of Isaac L., was born in Muskingum county, 
near Zanesville, Ohio, JMarch 15, 1822, and died near JIatthews, in 
Grant county, March 21, 1899. At the time of the family migration to 
Grant county, in 1835, he was thirteen years of age, and here his years 
were spent until manhood, and he acquired an education much better 
than most of his contemporaries. He possessed talent both in penman- 
ship and in mathematics, and for a number of years taught school. 
For two years he served as justice of the peace, and many people were 
married in his office throughout his part of the county, and some of 
those marriages have endured happily to the present time. For many 
years he also did the work of a notary, and for twenty-seven years 
was postmaster of the place locally known as Trask Post Office, an 
office which was diseontiniied in 1901 under competition from the 
rural free delivery service. While attending to the various duties 
of these offices, he conducted his farm either directly or sxipervised its 
management, and was the owner of eighty acres of fine land. Through- 
out his career he voted and supported the Democratic party. Ira J. 
Carter was married in Jeliferson township on July 25, 1844, to Eliza 
Ann Com. Her birth occurred in Rush county, Indiana, June 5, 1825, 



624 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

and she is still living a venerable woman, though quite active in body 
and mind, eighty-eight years of age, a lovely old woman whose char- 
acter has long been an asset in the community. She is a Baptist in 
religion and has been identified with church and its kindi-ed activities 
for the greater part of a lifetime. Her age was eleven years when the 
family moved to Grant county, and her parents were Joseph and 
Nancy (Said) Corn. Her father was a native of Georgia, moved in 
early life to Kentucky, where he married a native daughter of that 
state, and after two children had been born to them in Kentucky, 
Louisa and Lueinda, the family all moved to Rush county, Indiana. 
In Rush county Mrs. Carter was born and also other children as 
follows: Permelia, Martha J., Joseph and John. All these children 
are now dead, except ]\Irs. Carter, and all except Louisa were married 
and had families of their own, some of them very large houseliolds, 
Joseph having twenty-one children by two wives. 

The children born to Ira J. Carter and Avife were: Permelia J., 
who died in infancy; Harriet, also deceased in infancy; Gilbert, who 
did not survive babyhood ; J. Newton, a carpenter, who lives in Upland, 
Grant county, and has a family; Olive, who is the widow of John 
Kibby, a sketch of whom appeai-s elsewhere in this work ; Levi L., 
who is a farmer in Delaware county, and is married and has one daugh- 
ter; J\Iary B., whose first husband was Noah Hardy, and whose second 
was Elmer Pliatt, and living now in Gary, Indiana, and there were three 
children by the second marriage. Isaac L. ; Salina D., who died when 
seventeen years of age ; Jernsha, who became the wife of John Croush, 
living in Clark county, Indiana, and they have two sons and three 
daughters; Anna A., the wife of AVood Helms, a farmer in Fairmount 
township, and their family consists of three sons and two daughters. 

Isaac Lyman Carter was born in the house he still occupies, on 
October 30, 1860. That old homestead is in section twenty-one of 
Jefferson township. His home has always been in this locality and 
from boyhood he has followed farming successfully, and in a prac- 
tical, progressive manner, which marks him as a true son of the soil. 
His place of eighty acres is well stocked with graded sheep, hogs, and 
cattle, and he is one of the extensive feeders in this part of the county. 
His buildings are good and substantial, and represent prosperous 
management. 

Near the old home, Isaac L. Carter married for his first wife, Miss 
Mary N. Wilcoxon, who was born in Delaware county in 1848, and 
who died at her home in Jefiferson township, January 21, 1901. She 
was an active communicant of the Methodist church. Her six children 
are mentioned as follows : Glenn, whose home is with his father, and 
who is unmarried, is a graduate of Purdue University, and is now 
a seed and fertilizer inspector for the state of Indiana ; Alivila Blanche, 
died at the age of fifteen months; R. Emory, who lives on a farm in 
Fairmount township, married Miss Lula Goodnight, and their children 
are John and Blanche; John Burl, who is a graduate of the high 
school in the class of 1909, lives at home with his father on the farm ; 
Asa E. was graduated in the home schools, and is living with his 
father; Mary A. is a sophomore in the IMatthews high school. The 
present Mrs.' Carter was before her marriage JIargaret Ann Fitch, 
who was bom in Marion county, Indiana, February 26, 1869, was edu- 
cated in Wabash county, and is a woman of thorough culture and an 
excellent housewife and mother. Her parents were John and Sarah 
(Wiley) Fitch, who were born respectively in Kentucky and Indiana, 
were married in IMarion county of the latter state, and most of their 
lives were passed in Wabash county. Ilor father died in Huntington 




J. CLAY ROSS, M. D. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 625 

county, in 1907, at the age of sixty-four, while his widow now lives 
in Andrews, Indiana, and is seventy-one years of age. The Fitch 
family are members of the Methodist church. Mrs. Carter is the 
mother of three children : Lewis H., in the public schools ; Sarah 
Ethlyn, aged two years; and Edith M. Mr. and j\Irs. Carter belong 
to Kingsley Chapel Llethodist church, and Mr. Carter is a trustee and 
for a number of years was steward in the church. His political affilia- 
tions are with the Democratic party. 

J. Clay Ross, M. D. After graduating from the Louisville Medical 
College, at Louisville, Kentucky, with the class of 1906, Dr. Ross spent 
two years in that city as interne, in St. Anthony's Hospital, then estab- 
lished an office at Florence, Indiana, where he remained about four 
j'ears, and since April 21, 1910, has practiced at Gas City. Dr. Ross 
has already built up a large practice, both in the city and country. 
He takes his surgical cases to the Marion Hospital in conjunction with 
Dr. C. 0. Bechtol. Dr. Ross is a very genial, happy-minded gentleman 
of a very sociable nature, and has friends wherever he has gone. These 
personal characteristics combined with his thorough ability as a physi- 
cian have brought him a large business and he enjoys the confidence and 
respect of a large patronage and hosts of friends all over Grant county. 
He is a member of the Grant County and Indiana State Medical Societies 
and the American Medical Association. 

J. Clay Ross, who comes of a fine old Kentucky family, was born 
in Gallatin county, Kentucky, October 17, 1877. He was reared on a 
farm until he was eighteen years old, and his first work was as a teacher, 
after graduating in the scientific course in the National Normal Uni- 
versity at Lebanon, Ohio. Through school teaching he paid his way 
through college and university, and on March 29, 1901, graduated from 
the Commercial department of the Kentucky State University. After 
that for a short while he was bookkeeper in the First National Bank 
at Vevay, Indiana. In his ancestry and family connections were a 
number of physicians, and this was one of the influences which prompted 
him to take up medicine as his chosen calling. 

Dr. Ross comes of old Virginia stock, which was early transplanted 
into Kentucky. There is a family tradition that Betsej^ Ross who made 
the first American flag belonged to one of the earlier generations. The 
doctor's grandfather was Milton C. Ross, who was bom in Gallatin 
county, Kentucky, in 1823. He married Nancy Hopkins, who was born 
in Carroll county, Kentucky, about the same time. Both were of Vir- 
ginia stock of Scotch-Irish people, and early settlers in Kentucky. The 
father of Milton C. Ross was rich in lands, holding a graint of ten 
thousand acres in Kentucky, had a great retinue of slaves who worked 
his plantations and attended to his household, and was an influential 
and wealthy citizen. 

Grandfather Milton Ross died at the age of seventy-three years, 
while his wife passed away when seventy-nine years. They were mem- 
bers of the Christian church, and led lives of earnest Christian prin- 
ciple and usefulness. 

There were thirteen children in the family of Milton Ross and wife. 
Of these the only ones now living are : Joseph, father of Dr. Ross, and 
Dr. John J. C. Ross, of Bloomington, Indiana. One son, Thomas, was a 
soldier in the Union army during the war in the Eighteenth Kentucky 
Regiment. However, grandfather Ross was a strong Confederate in his 
sympathies and had held slaves before the war, having inherited them 
from his father. Joseph Ross, father of Dr. Ross, has been a farmer 
aU his life, and he and his wife now occupy the old Donley homestead 



626 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

near the Ohio river in Gallatin county, Kentucky. lie was bom 
January 19, 1855, and all his years have been spent in the vicinity of 
his birth place. He has been a Democrat and locally prominent. He 
was married in Gallatin county to Maiy Donley, who was bom in the 
same county. May 19, 1855. They grew up in the same neighborhood, 
attended the same school, and have always lived in companionship and 
their married life has been a particularly happy one. Joseph Ross is a 
member of the Christian church, his family religion, but Mrs. Ross is a 
Catholic, and reared her children in that faith. Her parents were 
James and Margaret (Breen) Donley, who were born in Count.v AVexford, 
Ireland, were married there, and some time during the forties embarked 
upon a sailing vessel which was three months in crossing the ocean to 
New Orleans, and from there came up the Mississippi River to Ken- 
tuckJ^ James Donley and wife died when quite old, he at the age of 
sixty-nine and she when seventy-four, and of their nine children, eight 
are still living. Dr. Ross was the oldest of three children. His brother, 
Charles, who was born November 30, 1880, lives on a farm in his native 
county, and is married and has two children, Joseph J. and Robei't L. 
The sister IMargaret, born July 27, 1895, was educated in the public 
schools and in the Villa McDonough Academy of Kentucky', and is now 
at home with her pai-ents. 

Dr. Ross was married in Hopkinsville, Christian county, Kentucky, 
to Miss l\Iamie Massie. She was bom near Houston, Texas, August 
10, 1884, grew up there and attended Texas schools and finished her 
education within six years in Washington, D. C. She is a grand- 
daughter of Dr. J. C. and Elizabeth (Sessums) Massie, the former a 
native of Virginia, and the latter of Tennessee, but they were married 
in Texas, and Grandfather ]Massie was a prominent ph.ysician at Houston 
for a number of years, but finally retired to his plantation near that city, 
and died there at the age of sixty years ; his widow died June 27, 1913, 
aged eighty-eight. Joseph Massie, father of I\Irs. Ross, was born and 
reared on his father's plantation in Texas, and married Mary Edmund- 
son, a native of Texas, a woman of many talents and of thorough educa- 
tion and culture, a graduate of HoUin's Institute of Virginia, and also 
of Vassar College. She was an accomplished musician, both vocally 
and iustrumentally, having graduated from the Boston Conservatory 
of Music and spent two years in study in Europe. She died in 1890 in 
the prime of life. Her husband now lives in New Mexico, and is serving 
as county clerk of Chavis county, with home at Roswell, the county 
seat. The Massie family are all Episcopalian in religion, and Mrs. 
Ross' cousin, Davis Sessums, is Episcopal bishop of Louisiana. Dr. 
Ross and wife have one child, Marion E., born October 10, 1906. Mrs. 
Ross has membership in the Episcopal church, while he retains his 
aflSliation with the Catholic church. 

Dr. Ross is veiy popular and active in fraternal matters, being a 
member of the Knights of Columbus Council at Marion ; the Elks Lodge 
No. 195 ; the Orioles No. 9 ; the Lodge of Moose No. 253 ; and the Nep- 
tunes, the Mother Lodge of which order is at ilarion. Dr. Ross in 
politics is a Democrat. 

B. Frank Duling. Since the pioneer settlement of Grant county, 
three generations of the Duling family have been identified with the 
industrial and social community in a way to promote the welfare and 
improvement of this locality. They assisted in the clearing of the wil- 
derness during the early daj's, and in the quieter years that have 
followed their lives have been led along the paths of industry and 
prosperity, and as farmers and good citizens they have done their full 
share for the enrichment of community life. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 627 

Representing the family in the third generation, B. Frank Dnling 
is one of the leading farmer citizens of Jefferson township. He was 
born in Fairmount township, January 11, 1869, a son of William and 
a grandson of Thomas Duling. William Duling was born in Coshocton 
county, Ohio, in 1838, and the grandfather, Thomas, a native of Vir- 
ginia, settled in Ohio at an early date, and lived there until most of 
his children were born. When William was still a boy less than nine 
years of age, the family started west and finally reached Grant county. 
The grandfather bought laud in Fairmount township, erecting a log 
cabin, started to battle with the frontier hardships in the midst of the 
green woods. The Duling family had their full share of pioueer expe- 
riences and hardships, and Thomas Duling had the satisfaction of 
replacing his old log cabin with a substantial frame house, and seeing 
his family grow up about him in peace and plenty, and as factors in the 
community. He died at the end of a long and useful life, at the age 
of eighty-four, and his wife preceded him when about seventy yeara 
of age. Her maiden name was Elizabeth JIuskimmons. They were both 
members of the Methodist Protestant church, and among the organizers 
of that faith in Fairmount township. 

William Duling was one of the following children: Oliver, John, 
William, Thomas, George, Mary, Barbara Ann, and Elizabeth, both the 
last named dying in infancy. Oliver, William and Thomas are still 
living, and Oliver is a bachelor. 

William Duling grew up on the old home farm in Fairmount town- 
ship, and subsequently bought sixty acres of laud near the old estate, 
and started out as an independent farmer. That continued to be his 
home until 1876, when he left Fairmount township and bought the 
James Nottingham farm of one hundred and six acres in Jefferson 
township. That is his home down to the present writing, and he is also 
the owner of eighty acres nearby in Fairmount township. William Du- 
ling and wife have well deserved their prosperity, since they were hard 
workers from youth up, and by thrift and good management acquired 
a property aggi'egating at one time more than six hundred acres. They 
are members of the ilethodist Protestant church. Thej' were the par- 
ents of eight children, and they are briefly mentioned as follows: 
Mary A. is the wife of Oscar Lewis, a farmer in Delaware county, 
and has two children; John lives in Fairmount township, is married 
but has no children ; Flora is the wife of Calvin Jones, and their chil- 
dren are : Myrtle, Clarence, Walter, EflSe and ilary. The fourth in the 
family is B,. Frank Duling. Nettie is the wife of Rev. C. M. Ilobbs, an 
active minister of the ]\Iethodist church, and their children are Donald, 
Sedriek and Malcolm. Elmer is the Delaware county farmer, and by 
his marriage to Emma Dunn, has one baby son. Effie is the wife of 
Frank Wright, an undertaker in the city of Washington, D. C. Glenn 
is a farmer in Fairmount to\\^^ship, and married Juanita Kuntz. 

Mr. B. Frank Duling, after growing to manhood entered upon his 
career as a successful farmer, and his prosperity has been such as 
to make him oue among the leading farmers of Grant county, and give 
him a distinctive place in affairs. At the present time he is the owner 
of two farms, each comprising eighty acres, and all the improvements 
and facilities for modern agriculture and stock raising are to be 
found there. In the little city of Matthews, Mr. Duling owns a nice 
home, and also has a stock and grain barn in the town, forty-four by 
one hundred and thirty-two feet in floor dimensions. His live stock 
comprises fourteen head of horses, and also hogs and other animals. 
Since 1909, Mr. Duling has made his home in the town of Matthews, 
and operates his farms from that point. 



628 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Mr. Duling was married in Washington township of Delaware 
county to Miss Amanda Dunn, who was born and reared and educated 
in that township. They are the parents of four children, one of whom 
died in infancy, the others being: Lloyd, aged seventeen; :\Iarjorie, 
aged thirteen; and Norwood, aged eighteen months. Mr. Duling is 
a Republican in national affairs, and always interested in good govern- 
ment as applied to his home community. 

Dr. Eli Mendenhall Whitson, who died in Jonesboro, November 
7, 1905, belonged to the pioneer Whitson family, and had lived in the 
community since 1844, when he came as a child with his parents from 
Clinton county, Ohio. There is mention of the Whitson family in the 
]\lill Township chapter. 

In June of the Centennial year. Dr. Whitson married Miss Annie 
Watson, daughter of Lorenzo D. and Elizabeth (Can-oil) Watson of 
Jefferson township. The Watson family had interests in three adjoin- 
ing counties, both Blackford and Delawai-e counties lying ad.jacent to 
their community in Grant. The four Watson daughters, Mrs. Whitson, 
]\Irs. Margaret Craw, Mrs. Minerva Lewellen, and Mrs. Virginia Beuoy, 
were all well known young women, and their acquaintance was not 
limited to their immediate community, ilrs. Whitson died in 18!*:^, 
at her home in Jonesboro, and because of an ante-nuptial agreement 
with her mother. Dr. Whitson buried her at Olive Branch, the Watson 
burial plot, near the old home in Jeft'erson. Dr. Whitson and wife had 
two daughters : ilrs. Elizabeth Mabel Hill, and Miss Georgia Gladys 
Whitson. He later married Miss Emma Coleman, who, with his 
daughters, survives him. His grave is in the Jonesboro cemetery. 

Few men live in a community and have higher tributes paid to them 
than Dr. Whitson. He was always identified with its every interest, 
and he had a wide professional acquaintance. He visited his patients 
on horseback, riding a sulk}% and finally having buggies built to his 
order. When his services were desired, he did not always investigate 
the possibilities of the family from a financial standpoint. Dr. Whitson 
acquired considerable farm land, and had business interests besides, 
but at his death, since he had no son, and his daughters and Mrs. 
Whitson did not want to live in the country, all the farm land as well 
as the home in Jonesboro was sold. He had always been very watch- 
ful of the farm interests, and knowing his reputation as a careful 
farmer, they did not want to see the property depreciate. Old Dick, 
the horse he had driven for many years was a problem, and he was 
left to end his days on the farm. 

Dr. Whitson was abreast of the times in both professional and 
social ways. As his friends gathered at the funeral, and while viewing 
the remains, a relative (Mrs. Beuoy) unconsciously paid him the 
highest tribute, saying: "It was always one cheerful place to come 
to." And what better thing can be said of any man or family? What 
higher tribute? While Dr. Whitson often reviewed his war record, 
three years of active service in the One Hundred and First Indiana 
Regiment, he did not have any more pride in it than in his citizenship 
in the community. He was a faithful member of the Jonesboro Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and his name is on the cornerstone as a member 
of the board of trustees and building committee. Wlien he died the 
church members felt their loss, and along at that time there were other 
losses in the same circle, but th(>re are always others who assume the 
responsibilities laid down by those who die or leave a community. 

Elizabeth M. Whitson, the older daughter of Dr. Whitson, was 
married in the Century year to Daniel W. Hill, a son of Nathan and 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 629 

Emaline Hill, and he had a position with the American Tin Plate Com- 
pany when it first located at Gas City. When the company's offices 
were moved to the east he went along, and he and his family have 
lived twice in New York city and twice in Pittsburg, and now occupy 
their own home on Liuwood Avenue at Bay Side, Long Island. Mr. 
Hill is with the American Can Company in New York city, aud is 
one Jonesboro young man who has made a success of business while 
living in the American metropolis. Their two little boys are Robert 
and Howard Hill. 

Thirteen years separated the birthdays of Dr. Whitson 's two daugh- 
ters, and he used to say he supposed the second one would go as far 
west as the first had gone east, and his prophecy has been fulfilled. 
While ]\Iiss Georgia Whitson always called Jonesboro her home, she 
made several trips back and forth to Pittsburg aud New York city. 
In 1911 she graduated from De Pauw University at Green Castle, and 
she was for two years teacher of Latin in the Thorntown high school, 
and in the fall of 1913 she matriculated in the Southern California 
Universitj', her purpose being to secure a degree from that institution 
and become a teacher in the western country. She spent two mouths 
with her sister on the Atlantic coast, aud crossed the continent to Los 
Angeles, bathing in the surf of the Atlantic and Pacific in the same 
season. An education would have been her father's highest ambition 
for her. When he graduated from a school of medicine, he knew the 
handicap of poverty — his best coat when he finished having been his 
second best when he entered college. But fortune favored him and 
his daughters have had the benefit of his professional success. While 
Dr. Whitson accumulated considerable propert.y at Jouesboro, it has 
all been converted into money, and his family have the advantages 
from it. The daughters still own a farm in Jet¥erson township, and 
Mrs. Emma C. Whitson still represents the household in Jonesboro. 

Concerning the earlier generations of the Whitson household, it 
is noteworthy that ten children comprised the original family, but 
smaller families have been the rule in later generations. Tradition 
has it that three Whitson brothers went west from Pennsylvania, one 
to Indiana, another to Kentucky, and the third to Tennessee. It was 
the family of John aud Sarah (Kimbrough) Whitson that located 
in 1844 at Jonesboro, where for three score and ten years their pos- 
terity has continued its existence. Some of the Whitson children were 
born at Jouesboro, and all but one died there, a record not shown by 
many pioneer families. 

John Whitsou went to the Chicago horse market in June, 1855, 
with a consignment of horses. He encountered "lampers" in the horse 
market and there being no demand for animals he left his string of 
horses, going back in September for settlement, and he was never 
seen again by his family. The wife (see Mill Township chapter) died 
at the family homestead in Jonesboro in 1892, her life having long 
been saddened by an unexplained absence. She had reared her own 
children, and some of her grandchildren had their homes with her, 
and she had a mother heart for all of them. 

For many years all the Whitson family enjoyed a dinner together, 
January 11, the anniversary of '"Grandmother's" birthday, coming 
so soon after the holidays when there were divergent family associa- 
tions, marriage with other families causing the separation at Christ- 
mastide, and all were glad to come together again on her natal day 
when she laid aside her kitchen apron and allowed the younger women 
the right of way in the household — only for the day, and then she 
was mistress again. The monument at her grave is one half of an 



630 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

octagonal block of granite, and it bears tbree inscriptions — her own, 
and two unmarried daughters, Margaret Ellen and Ann Eliza, a trio 
that had maintained an open door for all the relatives and orphan 
children in the family. For many years those two daughters conducted 
a millinery store, and had patronage from all over Grant county. 
Even now people say to Rolinda: "We used to get such pretty hats 
from the Whitson girls." Their trade in Quaker bonnets was not 
limited to Grant county. Before being milliners they had been tailors, 
sewing for Hudson Stewart, who M-as for years the most fashionable 
tailor in Grant county, attracting much patronage from JMarion. It 
was with the needle that the daughters earned the money to embark 
in the millinery trade. Of the John and Sarah Whitsou family, two 
children, Sarah and Lewis, died in infancy. The others were : ^lary 
Jane, who married Herman AVigger and is survived bj' one daughter, 
Mrs. Nora A. W. Tucker; David Miller Vore, who married Verliuda 
Jay and Asenath Wiuslow, and is survived by three sons, Rufus Alden, 
Rolland Lewis and Irviu Whitson; Ira Kimbrough, who married Sarah 
Harte, and is survived by his widow and a daughter, Mrs. Lula Agnes 
Davison, and a son, Fred Kimbrough Whitson; Martin Van Buren, 
who married Mary Esther Barnard and is survived by a son, Elvie C. 
Whitson, and a granddaughter. Miss Mary Clarissa Adams; Dr. Eli 
Mendenhall, whose family relationship has already been explained; 
James Liudley, who married Lucy Ann Amelia Hoover, and is survived 
by one sou, Dr. John Samuel Whitson. There were twelve grand- 
children and a number of great-grandchildren with the fourth and 
fifth generations represented in the Whitson family. Some of them 
are scattered far from the original threshold, and while once many 
Whitson family households were grouped about Jouesboro, the original 
circle about the hearthstone has been completely broken and its 
members have all "gone to the bourne from whence traveler do not 
return. ' ' 

Rufus Alden Whitson. Since June 22, 1913, the date of the death 
of Martin V,. Whitson, who was the last of the original Jonesboro 
Whitson family, Rufus Alden Whitson, the oldest grandchild in either 
the Whitson or Jay pioneer relationship, has been the senior member 
of both families in Grant county. His parents. David Jliller Vore and 
Verliuda (Jay) Whitson, were married November IS, 1854, at the David 
Jay family household near Jouesboro. The father was one of ten, and 
the mother one of nine children, and though only sixty years, scant 
two generations have passed since their marriage, their generation is 
extinct in both families. The deaths of il. V. Whitson already men- 
tioned, and Elisha B. Jay on April 7, 1904, marked the passing of both 
the ancestral families. Though both the families have thus disappeared 
in name, they were people of such sterling character as to leave their 
distinctive marks, and some of them were useful as long as they lived 
in the community. 

David i\r. V. Whitson, born November 3, 1832, in Clinton county, 
and Verliuda Jay, January 7, of the same year in ]Miami county. Ohio, 
met in Jonesboro when they were children, grew up together ami were 
married there. To them were born four children : Rufus A., Rolland 
L., and Irviu ; and one daughter, Sarah Jay Whitson. Verliuda Whit- 
son, the mother, died October 27, 18(i9, and the father was married 
December 30, 1870, to Asenath Winslow daughter of Daniel and 
Rebekah (Hiatt) Winslow. To this marriage Eli Allen Whitson was 
born. The father died July 10, ]87fi. The daughter, Sarah Jay, who 
was married January 7, 1885, to Joseph A. Jones, died February 8, 



BLACKFORD AiND GRANT COUNTIES 631 

1890. Eli A. Whitson, the son of the second marriage, died February 
19, 1892, and his mother, who had become Mrs. Asenath Baldwin (see 
chapter God's Acre) died March 30, 1895. It was once a happy family, 
but is now broken and scattered with divergent interests, as seems 
the common fate of all. 

Rufus A. Whitson was married September 12, 1874, to Elizabeth 
Teagle, daughter of Ornon V. and Patty Ann (Pursley) Teagle. Three 
children were born to this union: Charles Jay, who married Lena 
Crispeu; Verlinda Belle, who became the wife of Calvin Leroy John- 
ston ; and David Alonzo, who married Lulu Lind. The mother of these 
children died June 25, 1883. On January 25, 1885, Rufus A. Whitson 
married Emma Jane Carll, daughter of Jacob and Sarah (Pearson) 
Carll. Mr. and Mrs. Whitson, now that their children are gone, live in 
Jonesboro. Charles Jay W^hitson, their oldest child, had two children: 
Glen Aldeu, deceased; and IVed, and their home is ^Medicine Hat, in 
Alberta, Canada. Vei-linda (AVhitson) Johnston, the second child of 
Rufus A., became the mother of three children. Two of them, Calvin 
Rufus and Emma Madeline, preceded their mother in death, and one 
survives, Richard Keats Johnston. Verlinda Johnston died at IMor- 
gantown, West Virginia, September 17, 1908, and she lies buried at 
Jonesboro. David A. Whitson, the youngest child of Rufus A., lives 
in Prince Albert in the Province of Saskatchewan, Canada. Both the 
sons have wandered much since leaving Jonesboro, and the infrequent 
letters from them tell very little of their adventures on the frontier. 
When these two Whitson boys stai-ted out in the world, they tried the 
unbeaten paths, and they do not write many letters to tell of their expe- 
rience. They enjoyed cowboy life in the west for a while, finallj' cross- 
ing the Canada border, and they seem to have located permanently 
in the great Northwest. C. J. Whitson is fanning and drilling water 
wells, while D. A. Whitson is railroading in that part of the country. 

Of other members of the family of D. M. V. Whitson, R. L. Whitson, 
Centennial historian of Grant count}^ married Frances Henrietta Kel- 
logg, daughter of Edward Payson and Anna Maria (Nishwitz) Kellogg. 
They were married at Troy, Ohio, Jiine 16, 1886, and have one daugh- 
ter, Anna Verlinda. She is a student in Oxford College for W'omen at 
Oxford, Ohio. 

Irvin Whitson, third son of D. M. V. Whitson, married Addie Clark, 
daiighter of James and Martha (Douglas) Clark, November 29, 1894. 
They live in Lamoure county. North Dakota. Two children: Sarah 
Jeannette, and Clarence Ellsworth, were born, the boy dying at Jones- 
boro, but the daughter is with them in the Northwest. 

While David M. V. Whitson was a farmer and a member of the 
Friends church, none of his family have followed his example, and 
change of environment is the whole explanation. The family removed 
from Jonesboro to Liberty township, March 1, 1864. The father gave 
up his membership in Amana Lodge of Odd Fellows, and with his 
wife became a charter member in Bethel Friends Church, Mrs. Whitsor 
having been a birthright Friend and having made the necessarj^ con- 
fession because of having "married out of meeting." That long ago 
Friends were opposed to secret societies. The mother was clerk of 
Oak Ridge ^Monthly Meeting, of which Bethel ]\Ieeting is a part, at 
the time of her death, and she used to lay aside her Quaker bonnet 
and read the minutes, the custom of Friends years ago. 

While the pioneer Whitson family was always divided in its 
political affiliation, usually having a representative in each political 
party, the citizenship of the family has always been a matter of pride. 
There was a Revolutionary soldier in the ancestry, and four genera- 



632 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

tions from Thomas Kimbrough — Ira K., Martin V., Eli :\I. and James 
L. Whitson, all enlisted in the Civil war. Then Rufus A. Whitson of 
the nest generation put the flag floating in the Spanish-American war, 
going with the One Hiuidred and Sixtieth Indiana Regiment to Cuba. 
The present generation stands committed to the same type of citizen- 
ship that has always characterized the Whitson family. 

Thomas S. Thompson spent a good share of his life in his native 
county in Ohio, his advent into this state being marked by the year 
1880, when he settled in Jasper county. He comes of the best blood 
in the south, his family on both paternal and maternal sides being 
of sturdy old southern stock, and the Thompson family today gives 
evidence of being well born in its exhibition of many fine traits and 
qualities. In the north and west .stress is not laid, in any great degree, 
upon the facts of old and well established family lines, but the fact 
remains that the man who may view with pride the ancestry of his 
family is advantaged in many ways, and if he manifest a certain 
satisfaction in the circumstance, few wiU be found to adversely criti- 
cise him. 

Born in Madison county, Ohio, on April 1, 1837, Thomas S. Thomp- 
son is the 'son of Thomas L. and Mary (Davenport) Thompson, both 
natives of Ross county, Ohio, born of Virginia parents. Ignatius 
Thompson, grandsire of the subject, came in an early day from his 
native state, Virginia, to Ohio, and in that state purchased six hundred 
acres of land in the river bottoms of the Scioto in Ross county. He 
in later life went to Louisiaua, there contracting yellow fever and 
dying. His family was well established in Virginia and dates its 
residence there from the early days of the Virginia colony, ilary 
Davenport, mother of the subject, was a daughter of Anthouj- Simms 
Davenport, who was at one time a large plantation -owner and slave 
holder in the state of Virginia, and as a man of especially wide- 
minded characteristics, he, with the beginning of the anti-slavery 
agitation, openly took sides with the abolitiouists. While he was not 
whollj^ in sympathy with the methods and line of procedure of that 
faction, still he felt himself in the wrong in the matter of owning 
human beings, and he accordingly disposed of his interests in his 
old home and came north to Ohio, bringing his slaves with him, and 
there liberating them, it not being against the laws of the state as in 
Virginia. It should be mentioned, however, that his slaves refused 
to be separated from him, even after having gained their freedom, 
and continued to make their homes on his place until they married 
or found suitable homes elsewhere, many of them staying with him 
until death claimed them. So it was often the ease in the daj's of 
slavery, that those men who were just enough to see the injustice 
of their positions and methods, were also great enough that their 
slaves valued the affection of the master beyond mere liberty, and 
refused in many instances to accept their legal freedom with any 
degree of enthusiasm. 

Anthony Simms Davenport settled in the Scioto valley, near 
Chillicothe,'^ Ohio, at a time when there was but one log cabin in 
that vicinity. This was in the year 1800, and the fact that he liber- 
ated his slaves, some thirty-five in number, in that early date, proves 
him to have been a man of mature judgment and of many splendid 
qualities of heart and mind that placed him far in advance of his 
fellow men. His name deser^'cs a place in the memorial records of 
this state, to which he migrated in order that he might be at liberty 
to give expression to those humanitarian ideas that had but little 




THOMAS S. THOMPSON 



. BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 635 

place in this country one hundred years ago, but which in less than 
fifty years after he hrst expressed them, came to be the vital issues 
of the nation. Mr. Davenport was a kinsman of the well known Simms- 
and ilarmaduke families of the south, many of the name being found 
in the southern states today, and occupying positions of prominence 
wherever thej- are found. They are reckoned among the First Families- 
of Virginia, and as such are entitled to the high regard and considera- 
tion that is accorded to them. 

In 1800 Anthony Simms Davenport came to Ross county, Ohio, he 
being one of the first men to settle there, and in that county he became 
well-to-do and influential. He was twice married and reared a family 
of children by each marriage. They were of the Methodist Episcopal 
faith, as were also the Thompsons, and people of sturdy Christian 
character all their days, living exemplary lives in their several com- 
munities and gaining the esteem and regard of all with whom they 
came in contact. 

Thomas L. Thompson was born in Ross county, Ohio, in the year 
1804, and he was one of the six children of his parents to reach years, 
of maturity and rear families, the others having died in early years. 
He was reared on the old farm in the Scioto valley, and there he married 
Miss Marj' Davenport, whose family history has been set forth at some- 
length in previous paragraphs. After the birth of their first four chil- 
dren Mr. and Mrs. Thompson moved to Madison county, Ohio, and 
there settled on a new farm some four miles south of Loudon. This- 
place he later sold and purchased land in Jefferson township, iladison 
county, and there he passed his remaining days, death claiming him 
there in 1870 when he was in the sixty-sixth year of his age. He was a 
man of many noble traits, worthy of his parentage, and fit in every 
respect to perpetuate the family name. His many sterling qualities 
made him a man beloved of all, and if he had a fault it was nothing 
more than a virtue gone to seed — that of his too gi-eat faith in human 
nature. Over-confidence in his fellow men caused him the loss of three- 
separate fortunes, but after each loss he came up smiling, ready to begin 
work over again and mth his faith untarnished by an experience that 
would surely have embittered a less noble man. He died as he had 
lived — believing implicitly in the trustworthiness of the rank and file 
of humanity, and there were many who mourned his loss and felt 
themselves bereft of a true friend when death called him. 

He was a man who worked hard all his daj's and he was one of the 
successful agricultiu-al men of the county. He knew every detail of 
farm life, and no man could excel him in the field with reaping hook 
or cradle. He was all his days a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and an active worker therein, and in his politics was a stanch 
Republican, though a Wliig in earlier life. His widow survived him for 
some years and died in Madison county in 1877, aged seventy years. 
She, too, had been a hard working member of the Methodist church all 
her days, and her life was an exemplary one in its every detail. To them 
were born five sons and five daughters, brief mention here being made of 
certain of them who reached mature life. Mary A. died, leaving a 
family. Angoletta also married and left a family at her passing. 
Newton died five years ago in Ohio, as did also a sister, Jane. Rebecca 
is the wife of Samuel Johnson, now in Plain City, Ohio, and the mother 
of a family. Thomas S. was the next born. Nancy J. died after her 
marriage, leaving a family, and a number of others died in infancy. 

Thomas S. Thompson was reared in his native county in Ohio. His 
opportunities for education were limited, and he devoted himself to 
farm life from his early manhood to the end of his days. He came to- 



634 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Jasper county, Indiana, in 1880, purchasing a partly improved farm of 
one hundred and twenty acres, and there living quietly and busily 
until 1892. when he came to Gas City and here engaged in the whole- 
sale meat business. In this business ^Ir. Thompson accumulated suffi- 
cient of worldly wealth' that in 1908 he felt himself able to retire per- 
manently from business life, and today the extent of his business 
activities is that of giving some attention to certain realty properties 
from which he derives a modest income. Mr. Thompson is regarded as 
one of the solid and wholesome men of the community, and his reputa- 
tion among his fellow men for reliability and business acumen is one of 
which he is weU worthy as the son of his father. 

'Mr. Thompson has been a lifelong Republican and he cast his 
first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln, ever since that time voting 
the party ticket straight. He has never sought or held ofSee, giving 
his aid to the community in other ways quite as far reaching and 
effective. 

In 1881 Mr. Thompson married Miss Anna R. Lithe in Madison 
county. She was born in that county on April 8, 1858, and she died 
at her home on South East street, Gas City, on the 25th of April, 
1905. She was a daughter of Henry Lithe, who still lives in Marion, a 
retired farmer for some years past. He had a long and busy career 
in the agricultural field of labor and he was eighty years old when he 
retired from his work. Mr. Lithe was born in Germany and came to 
America when he was twenty years of age. In Franklin county, Ohio, 
he married Therese Lang, who was born in Ohio of German parents, and 
she died in Marion, Indiana, in 1910, well advanced in years. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Thompson there were born three children. Ide 
M. was born in Ohio in 1880, and she is now the wife of Thomas Pierce, 
living in Alarion. They have three children — Omar, Raymond and a 
baby daughter. Walter C, the second child of his parents, was born in 
Jasper county, Indiana, on August 15, 1882. He is a resident of Mason 
City, Iowa, where he is employed in a cement plant. He has one son, 
Max Thompson. Chester Allen, born in Jasper county, Indiana, October 
9, 1886, was, like the other two, educated in the public schools. He is 
unmarried and makes his home with his father. 

The family have been reared in the Methodist faith, both parents 
having long been members therein, and Mr. Thompson is a Prohibitionist. 
It is his boast that he has never spent a penny for intoxicating liquor 
in a saloon since he came to Indiana. He is a man of many excellent 
qualities, and he has a secure place in the confidence and esteem of the 
leading people of the community, which he well deserves by reason of his 
character and achievements. 

Andrew Jackson Lugae. Said Colton: "It is not known where 
he who invented the plow was born, or where he died : .vet he has 
effected more for the happiness of the world than the whole race of 
heroes and conquerors that drenched it with tears and saturated 
it with blood, and whose birth, parentage, and education have been 
handed down to us with a precision exactly proportionate to the mis- 
chief they have done. ' ' Farming is a noble profession and also a very 
profitable one as conducted bj^ the enterprising men of Grant county, 
among whom is Andrew Jackson Lugar who has spent all his career in 
this county, and belongs to one of the oldest of the pioneer families. 

The fine estate of Mr. Lugar is located on section six of Monroe 
township, where he is the owner of two hundred and seventy-eight 
acres of land. All of this is in cultivation, except twenty acres in 
timber. Near the roadside is his large ten-room house, painted brown, 
and erected in 1893. He has a large red barn, forty by sixty feet, 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 635 

erected in 1901, also another barn, erected in 1906, besides a sheep 
barn, thirty-six by forty feet, and other farm buildings. In 1912 ilr. 
Lugar produced from his land two thousand bushels of corn, eight 
hundred bushels of oats, cut forty tons of hay, and sold fifty head of 
hogs. In 1913 he has on his pasture fifty head of sheep, and specializes 
in this branch of the livestock industry. He has eleven horses, twenty - 
eight cattle and sixty hogs. He has been identified with farming and 
stock-raising for many years, and is one of the men M'ho have made a 
record of exceptional success. 

Andrew J. Lugar was born July 8, 1852, in Washington township 
of Grant county, a son of Joseph and Mary (AVilson) Lugar, both of 
whom were natives of Virginia. Joseph Lugar was the son of George 
Lugar, who in the late twenties settled on Lugar Creek in Grant 
county, and bj' his own efforts and also with the aid of his family took 
a very important part in making Grant county, the home of industry 
and of a high class of people. Joseph Lugar, the father, died in 1854, 
and reared a family of eleven children. The family record is given 
in more detail in a sketch of Joseph Lugar, printed elsewhere in this 
work. 

Andrew J. Lugar as a boy attended the district schools of Washing- 
ton township. He is one of the few men still living who spent a por- 
tion of their yoiith in an old log school house. He recalls that the old 
structure he attended when a boy was of the primitive type, had a 
rough floor, a poorly lighted interior, and crude furnishings, while 
the instruction was of the type usually called the Three R's. His 
father was one of the largest laud holders and most prosperous farmers 
in the county, and acquired about twelve hundred acres of land. The 
son Andrew lived at home until he was about twenty-six years of age, 
and then began for himself by farming his mother's land on shares 
for three years. In 1881 he made his first purchase of one hundred and 
seventy acres, of partially cleared land, and without any buildings on 
it. This original purchase is a portion of the estate above described, 
and has been improved in a remarkable manner since he first became 
owner of it. He paid twenty-five dollars an acre for land that is now 
worth one hundred and fifty dollars, and a large part of its value 
has been conferred by his own management and hard labor. He has 
added four additional tracts to his first purchase, making his present 
estate one of two hundred and seventy acres. 

In 1877, Mr. Lugar married Mary Emery, a daughter of John 
Emery, one of the old settlers of Grant county. Mrs. Lugar died in 
1891, leaving three children, namely : James, a farmer in ^Michigan ; 
Andrew, a telegraph operator in Chicago'; and Mrs. Isabelle Speaights, 
living on the home farm. In 1893, Mr. Lugar married for his second 
wife, Norah Moi-rison, a daughter of Joseph Morrison, of Van Buren 
township. The children of this marriage number five, namely : Joseph 
0., who is a bookkeeper in Van Buren ; Dolly, at home : William 
Hobart, a student in the high school ; Lelah, and Ruth, both at home. 
Mr. Lugar is a Republican in politics, and is affiliated with the Landess- 
ville Lodge of Odd Fellows. In November, 1912, Mr. Lugar suffered 
the loss of his right hand, which was caught in a corn shredder. 

Jordan Putrell. More than three score and ten years have been 
spent by Jordan Futrell within the limits of Grant county. A few 
years ago he retired from a successful career as a farmer and moved 
into Upland, where he now lives in peace and comfort, enjoying 
the resources accumulated by his early industry, and has a pleasant 
retrospect over the long past. Mr. Futrell is one of the men who has 



636 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

seen Gi-ant county develop from the time of log cabin homes, and 
when the only transportation was by wagon trail, through the early 
railroad age, and through all the marvelous developments of the twen- 
tieth century. 

His grandfather was Enos Futrell, who probably was a native of 
England, and early in life settled in North Carolina, where he lived 
until death, both he and his wife having attained good old age. Of 
their children Jlichael Futrell, who was born in North Carolina about 
1805, grew up there and in the course of time centered his affection 
upon a girl whose home was in the same vicinity. Subsequently her 
family moved north to Ohio, and that caused ]\Iichael Futrell to leave 
his native state, and follow her to the new country. On horseback 
he accomplished the entire journey over the mountains and across the 
valleys to Clinton county, Ohio, where he established a farm and was 
soon afterwards united in marriage with Miss ilary Rix, the North 
Carolina girl who was responsible for this change of residence. They 
lived iu Clinton county until three of their children were born, and 
then about 18-10 broke up their Ohio home and moved to Grant county, 
Indiana. They located near Lugar Creek, on a farm which had some 
improvements, and there Slichael continued his labors for a number of 
years. Later he sold his first place and bought eighty acres in Mill 
township near the county poor farm. That was the home on which 
both he and his wife spent their last years, and at his death in 1883 
he was past seventy-one years of age, while his wife attained to the 
venerable age of ninety-one, and kept her faculties until the last. 
Both were members of the New Light Christian Church, and in polities 
he was a Democrat. 

Jordan Futrell, who was the second among the children of his 
parents, and who has one brother and two sisters still living, was 
born iu Clinton county. Ohio, November 15, 1835. He was a very 
small child when he came to Grant county, and his earliest recollec- 
tions were centered about the old home on Lugar Creek, and all his 
education was supplied by the district schools of that locality. He 
reached his majority after the family had moved to ]Mill township, 
and after several years of work and experiments in different direc- 
tions he bought forty acres in IMonroe to-^'STiship. Industry and good 
judgment as a farmer, enabled him to gradually increase his holdings, 
until he had eighty acres, and though not one of the largest, this, under 
his direction became as fine a farm in the volume and quality of its 
products as any that can be found in the township-. Among the 
improvements he built two excellent barns and a fine country house. 
Mr. Futrell 's active career as a farmer continued until 1902, iu which 
year he moved to Upland, and four years later sold his farm and gave 
over the cares of an active life. He oAvns an excellent piece of property 
on Irwin Street, where he has his home. 

In ilill township in 1858, Mv.. Futrell married Miss Rebecca Bal- 
linger. She was born near Marion in 1834, and grew to womanhood in 
Grant county. The Ballinger and the Futrell farms lay side by side 
in Mill township, and this was the case of two young people growing 
up and knowing each other from childhood, and later uniting the 
destinies of their individual lives in married union. Mrs. Futrell was 
a daughter of John and Betsey (Burson) Ballinger, who were early 
settlers of Grant county, but later in life went out to Fremont county, 
Iowa where they died. The Ballingers were members of the Friends 
Church. Mr. and Mrs. Futrell have the following children: Mary 
E., wife of John Doller, a farmer in Monroe township, and has two 
children, Laura and Ruth: Nancy E. is the wife of Jasper Hobson, 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 637 

a farmer, and they have two daughters, Ethel and Zelda, also one 
son, Everd ; she first married Thomas Shannon who died, leaving a 
daughter, Rebecca, who is now living with her grandparents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Putrell; Emma died after her marriage to William Bird, and 
left three sons, James C. and Jordan L., twins, and Ralph. Mr. and 
Mrs. Futrell have four great-grandchildren living. 

"Will C. Jay. When there were but few settlers about Jonesboro 
the name Jay was placed in the Grant county directory, and the tradi- 
tions of the family center about Samuel Jay of Deep River Quaker 
stock, Deep River, North Carolina, having been an anti-slavery strong- 
hold in a country where human beings were in servitude. 

Will C. Jay of Gas City is a well known representative of this branch 
of the Jay family, there being many distinctive Jay family relation- 
ships in the county, but the Samuel Jay descent antedates all of them. 
While David Jay, who is mentioned in the Mill Township and the 
Friends' Church chapters, was the first of his immediate family to 
locate at Jonesboro, and while he came direct from iliami county, 
Ohio, his father, Samuel Jay, who left the Carolinas in the exodus of 
Quakers to the Northwest Territory early in the nineteenth century, 
was then a member of his household and he lies buried at Back Creek 
— a genuine Deep River Quaker buried a "stranger in a strange land," 
and all for conscience' sake. He was opposed to human slavery. His 
grave is among those marked with quarry stones at the instigation 
of Northern Quarterly Meeting of Friends, already mentioned in the 
chapter on County Cemeteries. 

W. C. Jay is a son of Elisha Benson and Ann (Scott) Jay, and the 
death of his father, April 7, 1904, was the final chapter in the family 
history of David and Sarah (Jones) Jay who came in 1835 in a 
wagon train from Miami county, Ohio, settling on a farm west of 
Jonesboro, living there one year before the town came into existence. 
This Jay farm is now owned by Fred Schrader. Some of the chil- 
dren were born in Ohio and some in Indiana. They were : Job, Ver- 
linda, who married D. M. V. Whitson ; Lydia ; Elisha, who married 
Ann Scott; Samuel; Thomas; William, who married Martha Ellen 
Howell ; Susannah, who married Hezekiah Miller ; and the first born, 
who died in infancy. All who married left posterity, and there are a 
number of Jays in the fourth generation of the family. Thomas and 
Samuel Jay later joined their brother and father at Jonesboro, and 
through Samuel, Sr., David and Elisha, Will C. Jay is in the fourth 
generation of Jays in Grant county. Through Mrs. Verlinda Jay 
Whitson, Charles J. Whitson and Verlinda Belle Johnston, there have 
been five children born in the sixth generation — a record not attained 
by all pioneer families, although the name Jay disappeared in the 
third generation of that branch of the family. 

Samuel Jay, the original Carolina emigrant, did not sustain active 
business relations with the community in Grant county, but his sons 
had much to do with the development and early history of Jonesboro. 
Thomas Jay was among the emigrants from Jonesboro to Kokomo, 
when the first railway entei-prise failed in Grant county. He had con- 
ducted a general store and operated a pork-packing plant there, and 
went to Kokomo to secure shipping facilities. He impressed himself 
on the Howard county metropolis, and his children are still Kokomo 
residents. Samuel Jay, who reared a family in Jonesboro, was for 
many years associated in the Jay & Bell Dry Goods store, an establish- 
ment rivaling Marion stores at the time jonesboro was bidding for 
the Grant county court house to be located there. David Jay, grand- 



638 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

father of Will C. Jay, was always an agriculturist, and a man of 
strong convictions. "You could not influence old David Jay against 
what he thought was right," and he was an active Abolitionist dining 
underground railway vicissitudes in Grant county. Old Slave Clammy 
"Wallace always told of the protection given her when she was a 
refugee by David Jay, Jonathan Hockett, and Nathan Coggeshall, a 
group of Abolitionists west of Jonesbora. While she never reached 
the "cold and dreary land" of Canada, the old woman always had 
kindly recollections of David Jay. He allied himself with Antislavery 
Friends and helped to establish Deer Creek Antislavery Meeting. 
When he died at sixty-four he had read the Bible through once for 
each year on his balance sheet of time. He enjoyed a lasting friend- 
ship with Meshingomesia and whenever the Miami chieftain was hunt- 
ing along the upper course of the Mississinewa, he always stopped 
and cooked a meal at the Jay farmstead near Jonesboro, and all the 
Indians accompanying him always slept under shelter — hospitality 
similar to that received from Samuel ^McClure in Marion. 

In war times David Jay sold his farm at Jonesboro and iiought 
the William Howell farm (the old Billy Howell place) when the 
Howell family emigrated to Iowa, and it was one of the best devel- 
oped farms with the first two-story log house ever built in Liberty 
township on Deer Creek. This farm in Liberty has not elianged 
ownership often, its succession of owners being Howell, Jay, Whitson, 
Sittton, Stiers, from the government title secured by William Hov.-ell. 
With his family David Jay had much to do with the organization of 
the Bethel church in 1864 (see sketch of Willis Cammack) and at the 
time of his death he was the recognized head of the meeting. He was 
the typical Quaker, and there was no sham in his nature. It was in 
1847 that David Jay's cousin, Denny Jay, located north of Jonesboro 
— the Jesse Jay homestead at present — and since their wives were 
sisters (Sallie and Polly [Jones] Jay), the Jay-Jones family which 
meets in annual reunion is the descendant relationship. The name Jay 
and the word Quaker were synonyms — interchangeable terms — in the 
early history of Grant county, but subsequent amalgamation has done 
much to change many family histories in this respect. 

Besides Will C. Jay, the other children of Elisha B. and Ann 
(Scott) Jay were as follows: Miss S. Alice Jay: Edgar B. and 
Charles A. Jay: Thomas F. Jay, who died after reaching manhood 
and is survived by a daughter, Miss Belle Jay; and James M., who 
died in infancy. 

On August 31, 1889, W. C. Jay married Miss Cora Hill, daughter 
of Nathan and Emaline Plill. Their children are: Fred W.. William 
A., Otis H.. and Richard H. ; James, the second in order of birth, died 
at the age of sis years; and Mary died in a beautiful young 
womanhood. 

Will C. Jay was a school teacher from 1884 to 1892, and after hav- 
ing a family "about him went to the Eastman National Business Col- 
lege at Poughkeepsie, New York, where he learned bookkeeping and 
completed the study of stenography, having taken some work in short 
hand while a student in the Valparaiso Normal School. Mr. Jay 
acquired a full knowledge of shorthand at an opportune time. The 
development of the Gas City Land Company in 1892 afforded him a 
position which he retained as long as the company was in existence, 
and he still transacts business for members of the company since the 
dissolution of partnership. The Gas City Land Company maintained 
an office in Gas City from 1892 until the Century year, and four years 
later the company dissolved and the separate shareholders in realty 



l^LACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 639 

have since employed him to look after their individual interests. 
Nearly all the stockholders in the Gas City Laud Company were Pan- 
handle Railway officials, and they thought they saw a great future 
for the town, but the story is all told in the failure of natural gas. 
Yet the work of the Land Company will always be apparent. 

ilr. Jay acquired a thorough knowledge of business methods and 
real estate transactions while representing the Land Company, and 
since then real estate and insurance have been second nature to him. 
From 1905 to 1909 Mr. Jay served as trustee of Mill township, and he 
has served the town as a member of the school board and as city 
treasurer, being alwaj-s active in community affairs. 

Singularly enough, when ilr. Jay's son Fred was ready for busi- 
ness training, after graduating from the Gas City high school, he was 
sent to Poughkeepsie. The son was a student sixteen years after his 
father was there, and a most striking coincidence was that while stu- 
dents there, father aud sou each won a dictionary as a premium in 
a spelling contest. The father received an International and the son 
a Standard Dictionary in the same kind of contests, written spelling. 
When the son graduated from business college he had one and one- 
half years' employment at New Castle, Pennsylvania, and then went 
to Gary, where he is an accountant in the office of the American Sheet 
Steel and Tin Plate "Works, beginning with the opening of the industry 
and remaining continuously. 

Charles A. Jay, a brother of Will C. Jay, also acquired a knov.l- 
edge of shorthand, and had employment with the American Window 
Glass Factory in Gas City, going with the company when its business 
was removed to Arnold, Pennsylvania, where he is now cashier and 
general superintendent of the factory. He married Jliss Blanche 
Thomas and three little girls have been born to them : Anna, Florence 
and Edith. 

While Miss Alice Jay has been principal of the ward school in 
Gas City many years, she was for five years a resident teachei' at 
White's Institute when it was a government school for Indians, and 
she made frequent trips to the different Indian reservations in the 
west in the interests of the institution. When Thomas P. Jay died, it 
was his request that his sister Alice educate his daughter, and for 
two years Miss Belle Jay has taught in the Converse public schools. 
Edgar B. Jay always lived at the family homestead until the death 
of the mother on June 18, 1913, the property having been acquired 
by Will C. Jay, and his mother having remained its mistress as long 
as she lived. 

Col. George W. Gunder. The career of Col. George W. Gunder, 
both in military and civil life has been one of strict adherence to every 
duty, and during forty-five years he has been numbered among Marion 's 
leading citizens. A veteran of two wars, in both of which he won dis- 
tinction, his record in business life is no less one of which he may well 
be proud, and although he is now retired from active affairs he still 
manifests the same interest in the affairs of his country and his com- 
munity which led him in earlier years to put aside his private interests 
and go forth to battle in defense of the flag of his native land. Colonel 
Gunder is a native of Darke county, Ohio, and was born July 6, 1840, a 
son of William and Nanc.v (Rice) Gunder. 

William Gunder was born in 1797, in Lancaster county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and about the year 1820 moved to Darke county, Ohio, as one of 
the first settlers of Port Jefferson. There he resided until 1855. in 
which year he removed to Montgomery county and there becauie a 



€40 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

major in rtie Dragoons, the old militia, and one of the foremost men of 
his community. He died in 1863, while his wife, who was born in 1800, 
in Preble county, Ohio, passed away in 1849, in Darke county. They 
were the parents of ten children, of whom four are now living : Daniel, 
who resides at JIarion; Mrs. Sarah Shepherd, an eighty-four year old 
resident of this city ; Mrs. Caroline Shepherd, living in Covington, Ohio ; 
^nd George W. 

After attending the public schools of Darke and Montgomery coun- 
ties. Ohio, George W. Gunder took a course in Lewis Academy, Lewis- 
burg, Ohio, and when seventeen years of age began to teach school. 
He had been so engaged about four years when the Civil War broke 
out, and laying aside the cap and gown he took up the sword and 
enlisted in Company B, Seventy-first Regiment, Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, with which he saw three years service. He was soon pro- 
moted to firet sergeant, and later to second lieutenant and then first 
lieutenant, and in the latter capacity commanded his company in sev- 
eral hard-fought engagements. The Seventy-first Ohio participated in 
a number of the most sanguinary battles of the great struggle, includ- 
ing Fort Henry, Fort Donelson and Shiloh, the campaign at Chatta- 
nooga, Atlanta, Nashville and Duck River. During many of these 
engagements. Colonel Gunder distinguished himself, and on receiving 
his honorable discharge, at the close of hostilities he had a record for 
travery and faithfulness to duty that gained for him the admiration 
■of his men and the respect of his superior officers. 

On his return to the pursuits of peace, in 1866, Mr. Gunder 
embarked in the mercantile business at West Baltimore, Ohio, and 
continued there until May 1, 1868, when with his partner, Mr. Samuel 
Arnold, he came to Marion, Indiana, and here for twelve years continued 
the same business, ten years of this time having their establishment on 
the present site of Barney Prince's store. In 1880 the business was 
organized as Gunder, Arnold & Company, dealers in diy goods, etc., the 
enterprise having by this time assumed large proportions, and in 1890 
the personnel of the firm was changed and the style became Gunder 
Brothers. This was conducted by Colonel Gunder and his brother until 
the Colonel's retirement in 1904, since which time he has lived a more 
or less retired life, devoting his time to looking after his extensive 
realty interests. He has been successful in a material way and has 
accumulated a large property, but while he has been a busy man, with 
large private enterprises, he has never neglected to assist in all move- 
ments for the welfare of his community, and his support and coopera- 
tion have done much to aid in the progress that has made IMariou a 
center of commercial and industrial activity. 

In 188.5 Colonel Gunder organized Company D, of the Third Regi- 
ment, Indiana National Guards. He was Captain of Company D for 
three years and was made major of that regiment under Judge IMcBride, 
now of Indianapolis, who was its colonel. In that same year. Governor 
Hovey authorized the organization of the Fourth Regiment, Indiana 
National Guards, appointing Colonel Gunder for this service, and when 
it was fully recruited, in 1890, he became its colonel. He was acting in 
this capacity when war was declared between the LTnited States and 
Spain, in 1898. and on ]May 12th the Fourth Indiana was mustered into 
service, although enrolled April 26, 1898. The regiment was mobilized 
at Chickaraauga Park, and on July 25, 1898. was ordered to Newport 
News, to embark for Porto Rico. After inspection by the Secretary of 
War, the Fourth was one of the first to be selected to go to the front, 
and subsequently saw service in Cuba and Porto Rico, and on the 
former island relieved the Spanish garrison at Mantanzas. The regi- 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 641 

ment Avas out one year, and was mustered out of the service at Savan- 
nah, Georgia, April 25, 1899. Of its one thousand three hundred and 
sixty men who left for the front, one thousand three hundred and fifty 
returned, the smallest loss of any regiment in active service, which 
was a distinct and eloquent evidence of Colonel Gunder's military skill. 
Although a strict disciplinarian, he was ever just, and was a great 
favorite with his men, who knew that he would ask them to do nothing 
that he would not himself perform. 

On May 9, 1861, Colonel Gunder was married to Miss Anna Snorf, 
who died April 17, 1896, without issue. His second marriage occurred 
May 26, 1897, when he was united with Nita Fisher, of Marion. Colonel 
Gunder has had no children of his own, but has reared two boys: 
Milton H. Snorf, whom he took when seven years of age, and was reared 
to manhood, becoming prominent in Wabash county business and politi- 
cal circles; and Vernon A. Cogwill, who was educated in Marion High 
school aiid West Point, graduating from the latter in 1890, since which 
time he has been in Alaska, the Philippines, and other United States 
possessions, and is now a major in the Twenty-fifth United States 
Infantry, located in the Hawaiian Islands. 

Colonel Gunder is a valued member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. He was made a ^Master Mason at Troy, Ohio, in November, 
1861, and has continued to enjoy the privileges of membership in this 
order to the present time, being prelate of JIarion Commandery No. 21, 
and a thirty-second degree member of the Indianapolis Consistory. 
Politically a Republican, he was chairman of the Republican County 
Central Committee in 1884, but of late years has only taken a good 
citizen's interest in public matters. He has been a life-long member of 
the Congregational temple of the Christian church, which he assisted in 
building. 

Evan Haevey Feeree. All that tradition lacks of being authentic 
history is verification, and the story has followed the fortunes of the 
Perree family in America that the name was Americanized when a 
woman and three sons came over from France, casting their lot with 
the people of the New World. All that is known of the original Ferree 
family in America is that one of the sons lived in New York, one in 
Ohio and one in North Carolina, where each has posterity, and the well 
known Grant county Ferree family is descended from the southern 
wing of this trio of Ferrees in America. 

While Daniel Ferree was of French ancestry with military blood 
in his veins, and not much given to the quiet, sedate life of Friends, he 
married Lydia Elliott, who was among the blue blooded North Caro- 
lina Quaker families, and some of her relatives were slaveholders 
according to the custom of the community. However, there was a 
revolt among orthodox Quakers against the institution of slavery, and 
knoAving they could not overthrow it they came into the Northwest 
territory to escape it. Daniel Fei-ree and his wife joined this exodus 
early in the nineteenth century, but he did not become a Friend until 
long after taking up his residence in Morgan county, Indiana. The 
Quakers had some restrictions that did not suit him — his life having 
been in decided contrast to their peace-loving attributes. 

It is reasonably inferred that the wife ruled when the Ferree family 
left the country where slavery existed, but after they came to Morgan 
county and when the environment was so different from the Southland, 
her church became his church, and their children grew up Friends. 
Evan Harvey Ferree remembers hearing his father tell of some of the 
obstacles in the way of this grandfather with Huguenot blood in his 



642 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

veins in reconciling the Quaker attitude toward slavery and his own 
early training, but in time he amalgamated with the society about him. 
It is hard for a strong nature to completely revolutionize itself, but 
that is what occurred in the life of Daniel Ferree, founder of the well 
known Grant countj^ branch of the Ferree family in America. 

In Morgan county the Ferree family lived neighbors to William 
and Ruth (Hadley) Harvey, and when the Harveys came to Grant 
county, John Ferree, a son of Daniel and Lydia (Elliott) Ferree, who 
had previously married Rebekah Harvey, came with them. This was 
the only Ferree of his generation who ever lived in Grant county. Mrs. 
Ferree was a sister to well known Grant county citizens bj- the name of 
Harvey. Her brothers — David, Eli, Mahlon, Jonathan, Jehu. Sidney 
and Alvin — and her sisters, Sarah and Mary, all have posterity here, 
some of them otherwise commemorated in the Centennial history. 
The children of John and Rebekah (Harvey) Ferree are: Alviu. who 
married Mary A. Bell; Evan H., who married Flora A. Cammack; 
Lydia, the wife of ^l. A. Hiatt; Charles A., who married Emma Dora 
Bond; "William E., who married Charlotte Annis; and John D., who 
married Ada M. Heaston. 

The Ferree family homestead was in the Little Ridge community 
in Liberty, and there all the children grew up, the father and 
mother later retiring from the farm and living in Fairmouut. They 
gave their children educational advantages, and some were students 
in Earlham College, in addition to common school training, and there 
were teachers, biisiness and professional men among them. Evan H. 
Ferree was a teacher for fourteen years, having had experience both 
in country and town schools and in a political way he has been highly 
favored by the voters of Grant count j-. (See chapter on Civil Gov- 
ernment.) He has served as postmaster at ilarion, and is at present 
connected with the Marion Light and Heating Company. 

Mr. Ferree on August 20, 1880, married Flora A. Cammack, daugh- 
ter of Willis and Sarah (Jay) Cammack. Their children are: Edna 
S., wife of Edward H. Harris, and Evan Mark Ferree. The two little 
granddaughters in the family are Virginia and Janet Harris. The 
Harrises live in Richmond, but each summer ilrs. Ferree and her chil- 
dren and grandchildren spend some time in the Ferree cottage at 
^Yinona Lake. j\Ir. Ferree has always been a useful man in the 
community, fulfilling an old saying in Quaker circles, "He is frequently 
used in the meeting." They adhere to the Friends' faith in which 
both husband and wife had their training in childhood. The religious 
intluences of his youth were from the Little Ridge and her's from 
the Bethel Friends Church in Liberty, two Quaker communities about 
four miles apart in the country. 

Willis Cammack. So closely identified with Grant county affairs 
was the late Willis Cammack that, although a native of Bartholomew 
county, he seemed to have always lived in the community. He came 
as a young boy to Fairmount with his father, James Cammack. at a 
time when there was only one house in the town. James Cammack 
set up a saw mill, and from his plant was supplied much of the mate- 
rial for the building in the early days of that village. 

Willis Cammack was a son of James and Penina (Cook) Cammack. 
In 1849 the parents located in Grant county, and afterwards moved 
to Hamilton county. There were five other sons: Calvin, William, 
Albert, Clark and Ira, and one sister, Elvira Cammack. Willis Cam- 
mack was the only one who continued to live in Grant county. 

There was a romance in the early life of Willis Cammack and Sarah 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 643 

Jay, and the outlines of the story may be properly sketched at this 
point, as part of the family records and as a matter in which subse- 
quent generations will take an interest. Nathan Morris had a son 
and daugher, Thomas and Ruth ilorris. Thomas Morris had plighted 
his troth with Sarah Jay while Ruth ilorris was promised to AVillis 
Cammaek. Both the ^lorris young j^eople were stricken with t.yphoid 
fever. Mr. Cammaek and iliss Jay went and nursed them, but the 
fever was so virulent that all care and nursing were in vain, and both 
the young man and the young woman died. The fever was a scourge 
in that part of the country in that year, and so Avidespread that there 
were often as many as two funerals in a single day from the same 
neighborhood. The death of Thomas and Ruth J\Iorris bereaved both 
Willis Cammaek and Sarah Jay, and in their grief and sorrow they 
turned to each other for sympathy and solace, and the result was 
that their lives were linked together ever afterward, and not long 
after the intimate acquaintajiee formed while in the Morris household 
in 1857 they were married. All were Quaker families and Avell known 
to each other. 

Sarah Jay was a daughter of Thomas and Eliza (Wareham) Jay, 
and her brothers and sisters were: Joseph, Denny, Mary, Rebecca, 
Angelina, Daniel and Ezra. Of this family of eight Joseph Jay was 
a resident of Richmond and all the others of Grant countj', and all 
of them well known in their generation. Thomas Jay was a well 
known Friends' minister, and after the death of his wife married 
Mrs. Elizabeth Rush, and together they went about the country a 
great deal in the service of the church. After the death of his second 
wife, Thomas Jay always lived in the home of his daughter, 
Mrs. Cammaek. 

The children born to "Willis and Sarah (Jay) Cammaek were: 
Rosalie, who married Orange Peters, and had one son, Charles Peters, 
an invalid from birth and now deceased; Bayard T., who married 
I\Iattie Osborn, and had two children, Carl and ]\Iary; Flora A., the 
wife of E. H. Perree, has two chilren, Edna S. and Evan Mark (see 
sketch of Ferree family) ; Ella is the wife of "W. E. Waggoner, and has 
two children, Sarah and William ; William T. married Emlin Cox, and 
their two children are Jerry Ward and Hazel; and Edgar mari-ied 
Catherine Harris. 

On January 4, 1883, Willis Cammaek married for his second wife 
Mrs. Elizabeth (Cornelius) Cammaek, widow of his brother, Albert 
Cammaek. She brought to her second husband a daughter, Sula, and 
to the second marriage was born another daughter, Laverne, who 
married Demetrius Howell. Their children are Kenneth and Willis. 
Four of the Cammaek grandchildren are married and live outside of 
Grant county, namely: Edna S. Ferree, wife of E. H. Harris; Jerry 
Ward Cammaek, who married Mittie C. Hurley; Carl, Avho married 
JIargaret Wright; and Mary Cammaek, who married Fred Gold- 
smith. Mrs. Ferree is the only permanent resident in Grant county 
among the children in the Willis Cammaek family. Sula Cammaek, 
the child of the second Mrs. Willis Cammaek, married R. E. Felton, 
and left a daughter, Edith Felton. 

While the family of Willis Cammaek are deceased and scattered, 
there was a time when they were well known in the Bethel Friends 
Community, and there never was a man in all Grant county who was 
more universally and highly respected than Willis Cammaek. When 
Bethel Friends ]\reeting was established in 1864, David Jay was rec- 
ognized as the official head of the meeting iintil his death four years 
later, when Willis Cammaek was honored in that way, and continued 



644 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

at the head of the meeting until his death, although for a few years 
he was an invalid and unable to occupy the pew in the meeting house. 
No one ever questioned his word or his religion, and he was a man of 
much influence in the church and the community. The biographer 
knew "Willis Cammack from childhood. He recalls one occasion of an 
otherwise '"silent meeting" of Friends at Bethel church. After the 
members had been sitting an hour in silence, and just before the 
breaking up of the meeting, which Willis Cammack always performed 
by shaking hands with the one sitting next to him, he exclaimed: 
"Be ye also ready," and the watchword suggested seemed to prevail 
and influence his own personal life — a man whose integrity no one ever 
questioned. For several years Mr. Cammack was connected with public 
improvements, associated with his neighbor, Isaac W. Carter, and 
with David Overman of Marion. Many miles of gravel road were built 
under his watchful eye, and when he died all who Imew him felt a 
distinctive commuuity loss — that a good man had been removed from 
things earthly and that he was worthy of the higher life. 

L. G. W. Richards. That farming is Big Business needs no other 
proof than a visit to one of the stock farms conducted by L. G. W. 
Richards. On the home place in section twenty-eight of Jeflierson 
township, a group of well arranged, shining Avhite buildings attract 
the visitor at the very first, and as soon as he begins to look around, 
he finds good management and efficiency written in every department 
of the farm activities. Mr. Richards has a reputation throughout this 
section of Indiana, as one of the most successful cattle growers, breed- 
ers and feeders, and it has been a matter of pride through a long period 
of years to keep up the highest standards in his fine herds of Hereford 
cattle. Mr. Richards is proprietor of three splendid farms, each one 
equipped with fine buildings. The home place comprises one hundred 
and twenty-seven acres, with a big and modern residence, and good 
barns. This is known as the Green Lawn Farm. Another farm owned 
by him is the Meadow Brook Farm, consisting of one hundred and 
twenty acres, and conducted by his son, Jacob Harvey Richards. That 
farm also has a fine equipment of buildings and facilities. Another 
farm is the old homestead, which was entered by his grandfather 
on the Mississinewa River in 1833, and is known as the Riverside Farm. 
The Riverside Farm consists of one hundred and fifty-five acres, and 
one of its improvements is a barn, forty by sixty feet in ground di- 
mensions, with a slate roof, and one of the best structures of its kind 
in the entire county. On each of these farms is a large silo, and the 
aggregate capacity of the three is two hundred and thirty-three tons. 
Mr. Richards and his sons are practical men in every particular, are 
hard workers, and yet are not slaves to their business, and are masters 
of agriculture, rather than being driven by the work as many less pros- 
perous farmers are. 

L. G. W. Richards was born in Jefferson township, September 30, 
1856. He belongs to the prominent Richards familj^ so well known 
through its different branches in this county, and more detailed infor- 
mation concerning the genealogy and family relationship will be found 
in the sketch of L. G. Richards, published elsewhere in this volume. 
L. G. W. Richards was reared and educated in the public schools, and 
since becoming of age has engaged in farming on his own account, 
and most of the property which he manages so successfully represents 
his individual accumulations and business .iudgment. Mr. Richards' 
parents were Jacob and Susan (Gillispie) Richards, his father a native 
of Guernsey county, Ohio, and his mother a native of the same state. 




ALBERT E. PUWELL, :\I. D. 




NETTIE BAIXBRIDGE-PO^YELL, U. D. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 645 

"When young people they moved to Grant county. The mother was a 
daughter of Rev. James Gillispie, a minister of the Primitive Baptist 
church, and Rev. Jacob Richards was also active as a preacher and 
worker in that denomination. They settled in Jefferson township, and 
were pioneers in this vicinity. Rev. Jacob Richards died when a little 
past eighty years of age, and his wife passed away a year later, when 
past seventy-eight. L. G. W. Richards was the third in a family of 
six children that grew up and were married. James H. and Isabell 
Harrison died recentl}', each leaving children, and those living are: 
Catherine, wife of J. F. Jones, of Jefferson township ; L. G. W. Rich- 
ards ; Hester, wife of John D. Leach, of Fowlerton ; and Lucy A., widow 
of John W. Patterson, of Jefferson township, and the mother of several 
children. 

L. G. W. Richards was married in Delaware county to Miss Clara 
M. McCormick, who was born there in 1858, and was reared and edu- 
cated in her native locality. Her parents were William and Mary 
(Corey) McCormick, both natives of Ohio, but who were married and 
spent most of their lives in Delaware county. Mr. and Mrs. Richards 
are the parents of the following children : Jacob Harvey, manager of 
the Meadow Brook Farm, married Mary Williamson, of Ohio, and 
their children are Jacob A., F. Belle, and Howard L. G. William F. 
lives on and operates the Riverside Farm, and by his marx-iage to 
Madie Jones of Ohio has one son, Mark Henry. Mark, who lives at 
home, was, like the other children, well educated and married Cleo 
Littler. Mr. and Mrs. Richards are members of the Primitive Baptist 
church, and he and his sons all vote the Democratic ticket. 

Nettie Bainbridge Powell, M. D. Identified for twenty years 
with the medical profession in Grant county. Dr. Powell is recognized 
as one of the two leading women phj'sicians in the state of Indiana, a 
physician who is accorded unstinted praise by her professional asso- 
ciates, and with a record of skillful service and large accomplishment in 
her home city. The science of medicine and surgery has made a remark- 
able progress in the last half centui*y, but aside from the technical side 
probably the greatest single feature in the progress of the profession 
has been the increasing number of women whose services have been 
enlisted in the ranks of the physicians, and who in ability and in capac- 
ity for the special work have demonstrated equal fitness with their 
brothers who have so long occupied this field. 

Nettie Bainbridge Powell is a native of Whitley county, Indiana, 
bom at Columbia City, January 5, 1868, a daughter of George Milton 
and Martha Jane (Hughes) Bainbridge. Her father was bom in Oneida 
county. New York, March 9, 1832, and the mother in Whitley county, 
Indiana, October 10, 1843. Grandfather Charles Wesley Hughes, on 
the mother's side was a Virginian by birth, came to Indiana many years 
ago, and during the war served on Governor Morton's staff, perform- 
ing a number of important commissions, both for the governor and also 
at the personal behest of President Lincoln. It is an interesting fact 
that Charles Wesley Hughes married Mary Davis, who was bom in 
Ohio, and was a first counsin of Jefferson Davis, once president of the 
Confederacy. She lived until June 13, 1912, her death occurring in the 
home of Dr. Powell at Marion, at the age of ninety-one, her birth hav- 
ing oecuiTed in 1821. 

George Milton Bainbridge came west aboiit 1862, locating at Colum- 
bia City in Whitley county, where he was married. In 1893 he moved 
to Marion, where he and his wife both died, he in 1903 and she in 1901. 
The father was for inanv years a merchant, but was not in business 



646 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

after coming to Marion. There were four children, namely: Charles 
E., a resident in Los Angeles, California ; Dr. Powell ; Hallie, deceased ; 
Gilbert M., whose home is in Chicago. 

Dr. Powell received her primary education at Columbia City. For 
her higher studies she attended Alma College at St. Thomas, Ontario, 
where she was graduated in the classical department in 1885. After 
that she was a student in the Northwestern University and took her 
final work in medicine at the University of Michigan, where she was 
graduated M. D. iu 1892. During the first years, after leaving college, 
she was engaged iu hospital work, and on September 5, 1893, located in 
Marion, where her home and field of labors have since been, and she 
has always enjoyed a liberal share of general medical practice. 

On September 5, 1893, she married Dr. Albert E. Powell, a well 
known physician of Grant county, whose death occurred September 20, 
1905. He was born August 2, 1868, at Francisco, Michigan, and met 
his future ■s^'ife while both were attending the University of Michigan. 
The late Dr. Powell for a number of j-ears served as county health 
officer of Grant county, and was also assistant coroner. He took much 
interest in politics, and was one of the influential Republicans. The 
two children of their marriage were : Emily, born February 13, 1898, 
and Edmund Bainbridge Powell, boru April 22, 1901. Mrs. Dr. Powell 
is a member of the Grant County Medical Society, the Indiana iledical 
Association and the American Medical Association. She is also by 
virtue of her colonial antecedents a member of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution, and has membership in the Eastern Star. Dr. 
Powell was appointed by Mayor Batchelor, City Health Officer of 
Marion. This makes her the first woman Health Officer in the history 
of the state of Indiana. 

Jajies F. Hults. Seventy-five years of residence in Grant county 
on the part of the Hults family, of which James P. Hults is a worthy 
representative, gives the members of the familj' a prestige in and about 
the coiuity such as is gained in no other way. He who established 
the family here in 1838 was a man of large affairs and took a leading 
place in the community where he made his home, and it is meet that 
his descendants should take active and intelligent parts in the affairs 
of their community in these later days. 

James F. Hults was born on April 10, 1838, on the home place, and 
within sight of the place he now occupies. He is a son of Thomas 
Jeft'erson and Susanna (Duckwall) Hults, both natives of Ohio. The 
father was born in 1818 and died iu 1863, on the 4th day of October, 
and the mother, who was boru in 1817, died in 1901. They were mar- 
ried in their native state and came to Grant county in 1838, where the 
father entered a piece of land in Monroe township traveling with Alex 
Smith to Fort Morgan to enter the land at the government laud office. 
He later sold his first forty acres at a price of $80 an acre. Consider- 
ing Thomas Jefferson Hults in the light of those days, he was an excep- 
tionally prosperous man, and was undeniably one of the best known 
pioneers of his time. He owned at one time as much as two hundred 
and eighty acres of land, and was prominent in his town as trustee of 
Monroe township in the early days, proving himself a capable and 
efiBcient servant of the public. Five children were born to him and his 
wife, namely: Cynthia, who married a Mr. Ferguson and is now de- 
ceased ; James F., of this review ; George W., who died iu Anderson- 
ville Prison dm-ing the Civil war; Mary Catherine and Margaret both 
died in the year 1863, as a result of fever, which also caused the 
death of the father at the same time. This triple tragedy came about 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 647 

as a result of Mr. Hults contracting the fever when on a visit to his 
son during the war, his death following soon after his return home, 
and the death of the two young girls coming shortly after that of the 
father. 

George W. Hults was a member of the Nineteenth Indiana Cavalry 
and was a famous fighter. He, too, died during the war, and thus did 
the Civil war, directly and indirectly, claim a toll of four lives from 
the Hults family. 

James P. Hults was the main support of the family during the war, 
caring for his own family as well as his parental home during those 
times of stress and strife. He had married in 1861, Jane Smith, the 
daughter of Henry Smith becoming his wife. She died in 1889, leaving 
ten children, coucerning whom brief mention is here made as fol- 
lows: George W., living near Marion; Susanna Fleming, living in 
Monroe township ; John B., now deceased ; Thomas William, living in 
Michigan; Margaret E. Fleming, of Monroe township; Benjamin F., 
of Marion, Indiana ; Charles, of Monroe township ; Mrs. Jennie Boles, 
of Marion ; Oscar and Silas, both living in Illinois. 

In 1892 Mr. Hults was married for the second time, Mrs. Melissa 
(Dickey) Lane becoming his wife. She is a daughter of Robert and 
Rachael Dickey, natives of Fayette county, Indiana, and Clinton 
county, Ohio, respectively. Her first husband, Nathan Lane, died in 
1888. Three children were born to Mrs. Hults' first marriage: Austin 
Lane, of Grant county; Ethel Runyan, of Hartford City; and Mrs. 
Lenuia Fleming, of Monroe township. 

Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hults : Goldie, who 
is a graduate of Taylor University; Clarence, Paul and Edward, all 
at home. 

The progress of Mr. Hults in his career is well worthy of considera- 
tion, and covers a long period of activity. "When he was twenty-one 
years old his father gave him forty acres of land, and the young man 
soon bought another forty to add to it. Upon the death of his brother, 
George, he bought from the heirs the eighty acres of land that young 
man had owned, and he later bought another twenty-five acres of 
another brother. This purchase was followed by the purchase of eighty 
acres from George W. Campbell, eighty acres from David "Wall, and 
twenty acres of a Mr. Johnson. His next purchase was forty acres 
from William Sheridan, and still later he bought one hundred and sixty 
acres from Blumenthal & Marks, in "Van Buren to'vvnship. With the 
arrival of mature years of his children, Mr. Hults has given to each of 
them a fair sized farm, and today he retains only one hundred and 
fifteen acres from the immense acreage he once held. 

In 1881 Mr. Hults built a fine brick house of eight rooms on his 
place, and a few years later an immense barn was built on the place. 
He still continues to crop his place, despite his advanced years and in 
1912 he harvested twelve hundred bushels of corn from his place, and 
nine hundred bushels of oats. Fifty hogs annually find their way to 
market from his pens, and he carries on his farming operations on a 
large scale. 

Mr. Hults is a Prohibitionist, and has voted that ticket consistently 
for more than forty years. He attends the New Light Christian church, 
and for many yeai's was a member of the Arcana IMasonie lodge of 
Upland, although he no longer keeps up his affiliation with that order. 
He is one of the fine old men of the township, and his friends through- 
out the county are legion. 



648 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Charles H. Hults. Successful and enterprising in his agricultural 
activities, Charles H. Hults takes a leading place among the younger 
farming men of Monroe township, where he has passed his life thus 
far and where he was born December 28, 1873. He is a sou of James 
F. and Mary J. (Smith) Hults, and concerning the parents more de- 
tailed mention is to be found on other pages of this historical and 
biographical work. 

Charles H. Hults was educated in the district schools and lived at 
home with his parents until he was nineteen years old. Thereafter he 
did farm work for hire for some six years, and when he married he 
rented a place and lived upon it for six more years. He bought his 
present place in 1904:. It is eighty-two and a half acres in extent, and 
he paid a price of sixt.v-five dollars an acre for the place, going in debt 
for more than $2,000, which he was soon able to clear away, and in 
1909 he bought an additional twenty acres at sixty doUars an acre. 
His land is estimated at one hundred and twenty-five dollars an acre, 
and is in fine shape, considered from every standpoint. In 1912 the 
place yielded eight hundred bushels of corn, four hundred bushels of 
oats, and he cut fifteen tons of fine hay. His annual sale of hogs num- 
bers about eighty. The family residence caps an eminence overlooking 
the place, and a large lawn with trees and shrubbery in abundance 
lend additional charm to an already attractive place. 

In 1898 Mr. Hults was married to Ida, the daughter of Milton 
Marshall, of Upland, and they have two children, Letha and Pearl. 
Mr. Hults is a Democrat in his politics, but not especially active. 

George W. Wilson. Many years ago, when Grant county was a wil- 
derness, the first Wilson came to this region, settled among the woods 
of Monroe township, and the people of that name were eft'ective 
workers in transforming the barren land into cultivated fields. 
George W. Wilson is a grandson of the original pioneer and occupies 
a portion of land which has been in the family ownership for more 
than a half century, a fact in itself which is an honor to the steady 
industry and citizenship of the people of this name, and the Wilsons 
have always been known for their quiet prosperity and solid in- 
tegrity. 

George W. Wilson is owner of two hundred and twenty-one acres 
of land in Monroe township, his home place comprising eighty acres. 
He and his family occupy an attractive dwelling, a large white build- 
ing erected in 1897, and standing on a knoll, well back from the road 
side in front of which is a wide sloping lawn. The large barn was 
built in 1871, and in 1910 Mr. Wilson, in line with modern progres- 
sive agricultural methods, put up a fine silo. He has recently bought 
the old home farm across the road from his place. The first eighty 
acres of his estate he bought in 1889, and for many years has been 
steadily prospering. During 1912 his crops were two thousand 
bushels of corn, one thousand bushels of oats, and twenty-five tons of 
hay. He puts off about seventy-five head of hogs each year, and is 
doing his farming on a profitable scale. 

George W. Wilson was born July 23, 1862, on the old Wilson 
homestead across the road from where he now lives. His father, 
James M. Wilson, died in 1885, and was a native of Virginia, and 
Grandfather Wilson settled in Grant county among the pioneers. The 
mother of Mr. Wilson was Martha Renbarger, who was born June 24, 
1827, and died November 25, 1912. Her name will alwa.vs figure in 
Grant county history, since she was the first white child born in this 
county, a daughter of Henry Renbarger, whose name belongs among 




MR. AND MRS. ISAAC R. WAGGONER AND THEIR H«_LME 
"PLEASANT VALLEY GARDENS" 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 649 

the first settlers in the wilderness of this region. She was born four 
years before Grant county was organized, under civil government. 
The eight children in the family are mentioned as follows: Thomas, 
of Marion ; James, a farmer of this county ; Cynthia Hults, of Marion ; 
Maria Jones, of Kansas ; Emma Stout, of Marion ; George W. ; Jasper, 
of Marion; Matilda Puckett, of Monroe township. 

George W. Wilson received his early education in the schools of 
Monroe township, and he spent the first twenty-one years of his life 
at home. He then mari-ied and began farming for himself. He built 
his first house east of his present place on eighty acres of land which 
he later sold. He then lived with his mother for a few years, and 
when the estate was divided he bought eighty acres of his present 
homestead. His next purchase was sixty acres known as the Jackson 
place. After his mother's death he bought the old homestead. All 
three of these farms have fairly good buildings, and are productive 
places under the management of Mr. Wilson. 

In 1883 Mr. Wilson married Miss Lydia Gage, of Monroe town- 
ship. They are the parents of seven children, named as follows : Mrs. 
Pearl Overman, of Marion; Dona Johnson, of Marion; Leo, Gladys, 
Lavon, and Beatrice and Bernice, twins, all the last five being at 
home. In politics Mr. Wilson is a Democrat and has served his com- 
munity in the capacity of road supervisor and pike superintendent. 
The church at which he and his family worship is the McKinuey Chris- 
tian church. 

Isaac R. Waggoner. To those who love the soil and the fruits thereof. 
Pleasant Valley Gardens is an attractive, luring title, suggesting good 
things for those who have appetite for two or three meals each day — 
and that means about everybody. In Grant county Pleasant Valley 
Gardens also suggests their founder and enterprising owner, Isaac R. 
Waggoner. 

Mr. Waggoner is a native of Wabash county, Indiana, born near 
Lineolnville, June 23, 1866. But as soon as he reached his majority 
he located in Marion, and is now well known to the business com- 
munity. His wife, Mrs. Waggoner was Miss Lizzie Nixon, from the 
same community in Wabash county. They were married May 26, 1888, 
while he was in the employ of Frank Carlson as a market gardener. 
The children born to i\Ir. and Mrs. Waggoner are: Miss Anna Wag- 
goner; Miriam who is the Avife of William Bodkins and they have one 
child, Robert William; Georgia, who is the wife of Virgil Bodkins; 
Harry Bryan Waggoner and twin sisters, Ruth and Ruby Waggoner. 
Some of Mr. Waggoner's relatives have been with him as gardeners, 
but as a family, they all belong to Wabash county. 

Mr. Waggoner worked only one year for Mr. Carlson, when he 
acquired a knowledge of and liking for the business, and his career 
as a gardener on his own account was begun at the old Boots Mill-site 
— bottom land along the Mississinewa, and then he moved to Wabash 
county, where he gardened for two years, still supplying his Marion 
wholesale vegetable trade. But the distance was against him and he 
returned to Grant count.v. At this time he located at the Barley ilill, 
a short distance below the old Boot Mill site. Pleasant Valley was the 
sign on that old mill, since torn down and rebuilt on the J. L. Barley 
farm in Franklin to^Aniship as a barn. He appropriated the name, 
the garden land being on both sides of the river, and when he later 
bought the present Pleasant Valley, part of it had been operated by 
him as a garden for several years. When l\Ir. Waggoner first located 
there he hauled all the garden products through the river and there 



650 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

was always danger connected with delivery, but he prospered and 
acquired his present home up the hill from the first bottoms along the 
Mississinewa where he has developed one of the best garden spots in 
Indiana. The Washington-Pleasant range line passes through the gar- 
den, but at that point the ilississinewa is the boundary and the property 
is taxed in Washington and Mr. Waggoner is a Washington township 
voter. He has 64 acres in high and low lands, and the high land is 
adapted to small fruits, as the lowlands to vegetables. 

The Mississinewa is both his friend and his enem.y, and alhivial soil 
is the nature of the garden. Mr. Waggoner has installed the Skinner 
irrigation system, utilizing electric power from the Marion Light and 
Heating Company direct, and each year he will add to his system of pipe 
lines until he will no longer be dependent upon the weatherman — sun- 
shine being as frequent as showers in Pleasant Valley. 

While Mr. Waggoner is an all-around gardener he has two special- 
ties, strawberries and canteloupes, and the Waggoner canteloupe is 
very much in demand on the Chicago mai-ket. While he has always sup- 
plied wholesale trade — ilarion dealers — Mr. Waggoner \vas friendly 
toward the new-market house proposition and engaged a stand there, 
but the first season found him still supplying dealers, with neither time 
nor stock for a stall on the city market. He has always made a spe- 
eialtj- of green corn, but the telephone orders from ^Marion grocers 
more than consume his product. In short, the man who started market 
gardening without a dollar and wath debt confronting him, has suc- 
ceeded in business, and he is now a factor in the commercial world of 
Marion — controls the situation from the standpoint of fruit and vege- 
tables. There are two small green houses and extensive cold frames for 
propagation purposes, and cement has served an excellent purpose in 
their construction. The home is lighted with electricity, and the irriga- 
tion is accomplished that way, and in lime other use will be made of 
the power. There is a wind pump, and a water system had been installed 
before the electricity was utilized at Pleasant Valley. 

It is only a short walk from Pleasant Valley to the interurban car, 
but for seven months of the year while there is produce to market the 
Pleasant Valley wagons are seen about the streets — though in wduter 
the family use the eai'S. There is rugged scenery — Mississinewa hills, 
and a winding road from the house to the garden, and picturesque is 
the word that describes the place, and ]\Ir. and Mrs. Waggoner fully 
understand how their present comfortable situation has been attained, 
and they are still laboring as hard as when it was more incumbent upon 
them. The telephone orders are received from the house or from an 
extension phone in one of the vegetable packing sheds in the garden. 
and Pleasant Valley is one of the most profitable farm investments 
in Grant county — the profit coming from strict attention to all the 
details of the fruit and vegetable trade — a business that requires care- 
ful and sensible management. Mr. Waggoner has made an eminent 
success of it. 

Samuel Wise. Material prosperity has long been in the possession of 
Samuel Wise. Mr. Wise has earned all that he has ever acquired, 
and few men have performed a more skillful and industrious part in 
the life and activities of Jefi'erson township during the last thirty or 
forty years than this citizen, who combines a large industry as a 
farmer with practice of his trade as a blacksmith and machinist, his 
home being in section seventeen. A large dwelling house and barn 
are features of his place which attract attention first of all, and about 
these buildings his well cultivated fields, his high grade and well kept 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 651 

stock all indicate the thrifty and efficient character of the proprietor. 
Mr. Wise started out with very little more than the average young 
man of his time had on arriving at manhood, has made a remarkable 
record of increasing his possessions, and all his accumulations repre- 
sent his industry and honorable dealing. 

Samuel Wise comes from an old Pennsylvania family of Dutch 
ancestry, and some of its connections were the Viglers and Shaeffers 
of Center county, Pennsylvania. Samuel Wise, grandfather of Samuel, 
was born in Center county, Pennsylvania, about one hundred years 
ago. His early life was spent in his native vicinity, and as a trade he 
choose woodworking and became a skilled carpenter and joiner. 
After he came to Indiana, he made practically all the furniture for 
his home, and it was much superior in design and stability to the 
average furnishings of Grant county homes in those days. In Center 
county he married a Miss Shaffer, and all their four sons were born 
in that coimty, namely: John, Jacob, Henry, and Samuel. In 1847, 
the family came to Pennsylvania, and with one horse and a wagon 
journeyed slowly overland to Indiana, until they reached Grant 
county. There Daniel Wise first located on a rugged farm in Mill 
township, and a few years later bought one hundred and sixty acres 
of land in Jefferson township. This purchase was in section five of 
that township, and there he applied himself vigorously to the clearing 
and improvement and cultivation of his land, until Avith the aid of 
his wife he had made an excellent farm. The four sons grew up on 
that place, and the parents fkially retired and spent their declining 
years in the home of their son Jacob. Both were in the fullness of 
years when death came to them. They were of the fine old type rep- 
resented by the pioneer, kindly neighbors, upright in all their actions, 
and left behind them the heritage of a good name. Only one of their 
sons, Henry, is still living, a well known farmer at Gas City. Samuel 
died unmarried when twenty-six years of age, and John died some 
years ago, leaving a family. 

Jacob Wise, father of Samuel, was born in Center county, Penn- 
sylvania, iu 1833, and was fourteen years old when the family migra- 
tion was accomplished to Grant county. On reaching manhood he 
started out to make his own way, and chose farming as his vocation. 
He was always regarded as one of the most substantial and success- 
ful men in his locality, and eventually acquired a large property. 
After giving all his children a good start he still had two hundred 
acres, which is now owned and occupied by his widow. Her maiden 
name was Elizabeth Marine, a sister of Daniel Marine, prominent fam- 
ily in Grant county, whose history is given in greater detail on other 
pages. Mrs. Jacob Wise is now seventy-eight years of age. Jacob 
Wise died on the old homestead in section four of Jefferson township, 
in the fall of 1909. 

Samuel Wise was born on his father's farm in Jefferson township, 
December 8, 1856. As a boy he attended the public schools when 
school was in session, and in the holidays and vacation pui-sued a quite 
rigid course of duty about the home. On growing up, and after his 
marriage, he bought eighty acres of land in section seventeen, and 
there made his start, and that place has been the scene of his most 
successful achievements. Farming and stock raising were the busi- 
nesses to which he gave all his attention for a number of years, and as 
he acquired a little surplus he reinvested iu land, increased his estate 
to one hundred and sixty acres. At the present time his farm has 
four different sets of buildings, is well provided and equipped for 
tenant farming. Probably no land in Jefferson township is graded 



652 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

to a higher degree of productiveness, and yet with better care for its 
future fertility, than the Wise farm. His own home has a good 
dwelling house and excellent barns. A number of years ago. after 
getting well started as a farmer. jMr. "Wise set up on his own land a 
little shop in order to pei'form his o^\ti blacksmithing. In that trade 
he had had a little experience, and possessing a natural aptitude for 
mechanical work, he soon proved himself adept. From doing work 
for his own convenience, there soon same a demand from his neighbors 
for help in this way. Thus his trade grew as a matter of personal 
accommodation, until it became necessary for him to devote practically 
his entire time and attention, and he set up a shop twenty-five by thirty 
feet and equipped it with all the appliances for high-grade custom 
blacksmithing. Since tlien i\Ir. Wise has been a blacksmith, first of 
all, though in the background he has his large farm, and keeps an eye 
on iti cultivation and the raising of his stock, although the actual work 
is necessarily performed by outside labor. Mr. Wise many years ago 
made a reputation for his skill in the mending of boilers and tubes, 
and as his reliability in repairing that very delicate class of machinery 
became better known he was sent for frequently to use his services in 
different sections of the county and even beyond the limits of Grant 
county. Mr. Wise was married in May, 1882, to iliss Sarah Ellen 
Bole. Mrs. Wise, who has well dignified her place as a wife, and 
whose many acts of kindliness and charity have given her a place of 
affection in the community, was born in Jefferson township in 1853, 
a daughter of George Bole, and of one of the old and well known fam- 
ilies of Grant county. George Bole was born in Ohio, came to Grant 
county at an early day, was a farmer in Jeft'erson township, where he 
passed away when more than sixty years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Wise 
have no children, and are members of the Christian church, while in 
political faith he is a Democrat. 

George Haines. Grant county has its many beautiful and valua- 
ble farm estates, some of which have been under one name since the 
pioneer era of this region. George Haines occupies a portion of the 
land which was settled by his father nearly seventy years ago, and 
has himself been closely identified with ^Monroe township for over forty 
years. As a farmer and stockman he has made a fine record and he 
bears a name which has always been associated Avith honest industn,' 
and unimpeachable integrity, in this county. 

George Haines was born on the Haines farm in section eight of 
Monroe tomiship, April 15, 1850, a son of James and Nancy W. (Smith) 
Haines, both of whom were natives of Fayette county. Ohio, where 
they were reared and married. The father, who was born ]\Iarch 14, 
ISIS, and died in :March. 188-4. came to Grant county in 1844. and filed 
a claim on one hundred and sixty acres of government land. He did 
not settle on that place because of its low situation and the water 
wliicli stood in gi-eat lakes over its surface at the time. He bought 
forty acres on a higher level, cleared off the woods, and erected a cabin 
of round logs, which furnished the first home of the Haines family in 
Grant county. At the time of his settlement there were no roads in the 
vicinity, and he and his family had to contend with many pioneer 
conditions and hardships. Despite his hard beginning. James Haines 
prospered and at one time was owner of aliout nine hundred acres of 
land. As his children became of age he gave to each one a farm, and 
provided liberally for those dependent upon him. and always exercised 
a wholesome influence in the life of the community. He was a IMason 
from the time he became of age, and was also a communicant of the 



BLACKP^ORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 653 

Methodist church. The seven children in his family were named as 
follows : Mrs. Susanna Boiler, a widow residing in Monroe township ; 
Mrs. Rebecca E. Kelley, now deceased, who lived in Blackford county; 
Milton, deceased; George; Samuel, of Van Bureu; Alfred, on the old 
homestead in Monroe township; and Constantine, of Alhambra, Cali- 
fornia. 

George Haines was educated in the district schools of Monroe town- 
ship, and as his father was in more than ordinary circumstances, he 
also enjoyed the advantages of the town schools, attending the insti- 
tution at Marion taught by William and Bina Russell, during 1868-69 
and 1870. After that he served a period as school teacher for three 
terms, teaching in the number one school in Jefferson township, in 
number two in Pleasant township, and number one in Monroe town- 
ship. "When he became of age his father gave him one hundred and 
twenty acres of land, and the sou afterwards paid a part of the value 
of this to his father. Since that original acquisition he has added four 
hundred and forty acres, making his estate now a farm of five hun- 
dred and sixty acres, lying in sections four, five, eight and nine of Mon- 
roe to\niship. His home is situated on section five. About 1876 he 
added eighty acres adjoining his first place and then bought seventy 
acres nearby. In 1885 he purchased the interests of some of the heirs 
in the home farm, and in 1888 bought one hundred and sixty acres of 
land. He personally manages and farms all but one hundred and sixty 
acres on section four, which is conducted under a tenant. His home 
dwelling is a large white frame house, a very attractive home, compris- 
ing eleven rooms and erected in 1885. Back of it is situated a large 
red barn, forty by seventy-five feet and built in 1885. The farm in 
section four also has good barns and a dwelling house. Mr. Haines 
is one of the large crop raisers of Monroe township, and in 1912 his 
record for production was two thousand bushels of corn, two thousand 
bushels of oats, and sixty tons of hay. On his farm Mr. Haines has 
about forty head of cattle, and one hundred hogs, using eight horses 
for the farm work. He markets each year about one hundred and 
twenty-five hogs. 

In the spring of 1885, Mr. Haines married Miss Margaret Benbow, 
a daughter of Thomas Benbow. Six children were born to their mar- 
riage, four of whom are now living, namely: Lena J., at home; Benja- 
min, deceased; Willis W., at home; Wilmont, in school, at Muncie; one 
that died in infancy; and Geneva Beatrice. Mr. Haines is a Republi- 
can in politics, and he and his family worship in the Christian church. 

Btron L. Bunker. How farming pays under the direction of an 
energetic and able agriculturist is well illustrated in the activities of 
Byron L. Bunker of Monroe to^\'nship. Mr. Bunker, though reared 
and in early life following farming was for many years engaged in con- 
tracting and a few years ago invested his means and resumed the work 
which constituted his first love in his vocations of life. At the present 
time he has almost a model estate in Monroe township, situated in sec- 
tion eleven. It is on the Arcana gravel road, where he is the owner 
of one hundred and sixty acres of land, all in cultivation except a tim- 
ber lot of eight acres. During 1912 he produced three thousand bush- 
els of corn which at the prevailing price was worth a good deal of 
money, though he sold none of his grain, feeding it all to his stock. 
He also had a crop of thirty tons of hay during that year. In 1912 
he sent one hundred and eighty swine to market, and from this source 
alone it is not difficult to estimate that the income of the Bunker farm 
is a very large one. In 1913 his crops comprised seventy acres of corn, 



654 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

sixty acres of oats, and other smaller crops. At this writing he has 
one hundred and thiry hogs on his farm, and he raises aU the grain 
needed to grow and fatten them for the market. During this year he 
is also renting eighty acres besides his own place. Mr. Bunker and 
family reside in a comfortable brick house of eight rooms and it is in 
many respects as comfortable as the average city home and is heated 
by steam and has all the facilities for family life on a modern and 
attractive Ijasis. 

Byron L. Bunker was born February 1, 1862, in "Wa^•ne county, 
Indiana, a sou of Francis F. Bunker, who was born in 1840 and died 
in 1890. He was a native of North Carolina, and his father Thomas 
Bunker came from North Carolina and settled in Wayne county, dur- 
ing the pioneer period. During the Civil war Francis F. Bunker was 
for four years a Union soldier, having enlisted from Wayne county, 
and going through the war as a valiant defender of the integrity of 
the state. After the war he moved to Jay county, where he bought 
the farm, on which he spent the balance of his life. The maiden name 
of his wife M-as Lorena Hunt of Wayne county, who died in 1873 at 
the age of thirty-two years. By this marriage there were four chil- 
dren, namely : Alpha Retta, deceased ; Byron L., Thomas Sheridan, 
of Jay county; Ira. who died at the age of seventeen, and one that 
died in infanc.y. The father for his second wife married Angelina 
Johnson, whose six children were Alice, May, deceased, Evi, Myrtle, 
Orvall. and Garfield. The second wife died when thirty years old, and 
Francis F. Bunker then married Alvira Votaw, who died in the spring 
of 1911. 

Byron L. Bunker grew up in Jay countj', where he attended the 
local schools, and when twentj^-one years of age left home, married and 
for two years operated a farm belonging to his father. In 1885 he 
moved out to Kansas during the boom period in that state, but re- 
mained as a contender against the adversities of the west for only 
two years, and in 1887 returned to his home state. For several years 
he was engaged in contract work of grading roads and highways. 
Then for about eight years he was employed by the ilarion Gas Com- 
pany. In 1902 he began taking contracts for the laying of pipe lines, 
and laid one line from Marion to LaFontain, another from Marion to 
near Fairmount and relaid the line at Jefferson, Ohio. He then went 
to Canada, where he was engaged in laying one hundred miles of pipe 
line. Returning to Indiana in 1907, he bought sixty acres of land 
near Sweetser. In the same year he bought twenty-four acres near 
Hanfield, and soon afterwards bought thirty-two acres adjoining. All 
of this land he sold in 1911, and then came to Monroe township, where 
he bought his present estate of one hundred and sixty acres. Mr. 
Bunker has won his success by his own efforts, and has demonstrated 
that it is possible to pay a high price for agricultural land and still 
prosper as a result of its energetic management. For the land near 
Sweetser he paid one hundred and forty-three dollars an acre. He 
broke the record of land sales in Grant county, when he sold this for 
two hundred and five dollars per acre. He also sold part of his land 
near Hanfield, 47 acres, making a thousand dollars on the deal. For 
his present farm in Monroe to\Miship he paid one hundred and twenty- 
five dollars an acre, and as a result of his various improvements, it 
is now worth considerably more. 

By his first marriage which occurred in 1883. IMr. Bunker had four 
children, namely: Charles Arthur, of Kansas City; Walter B.. of 
Kansas City; Fred B., who is with the Marion Gas Company; and ilrs. 
Flossie Harper, of Portland, Indiana. April 16, 1904. Mr. Bunker 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 655 

married Lillian St. Clair, of Marion, a daughter of "William St. Clair. 
Mr. Bunker has seven grandchildren, six living. James Byron died 
when an infant; Kearney Richardson and Maxine are children of 
Charles Bunker; Raymond Earl and Anna Louise are children of Fred 
Bunker; Palmer Byron and Helen Louise are children of Mrs. Flos- 
sie Harper. In politics Mr. Bunker is a Republican, affiliated with the 
Marion Lodge of the Fraternal Order of Eagles. In religion his par- 
ents were members of the Quaker church. Mrs. Bunker is a communi- 
cant of the Marion Christian church. 

OzRO Geoce Fankboner. It was in the days of the covered wagon 
emigrant train that George Kline Fankboner, from whom 0. G. Fank- 
boner of Fairmouut is lineally descended, came from Tuscarawas county, 
Ohio, and located along the ilississiuewa across from Jonesboro. He 
was not the first "Boner" to locate in Grant county, and to this day 
people have difficulty with the name, and it is as often called "Frank- 
boner" and abridged to "Boner" as it is coi-rectly spoken, although 
there are several Fankboner families in the community. 

G. K. Fankboner sold his Tuscarawas county farm at forty dollars 
an acre, thinking it well sold. But when it developed that all that 
country was underlaid with iron ore, with melting furnaces springing 
up all over it, and that it sold again at two hundred dollars, he saw his 
mistake, but he had found good land — better farming land in Indiana. 

The Faukboners who were already located at Jonesboro when 
George K. and Sarah (Moore) Fankboner arrived, were his brothers, 
and most of G. K. Fankboner and wife's children were grown, some 
of them married, but not all of them came to Grant county. The chil- 
dren of George K. and wife were: John, who married Mary Gaskell; 
Levi Lewis, who married Rachel Jane Moreland, through whom 0. G. 
Fankboner belongs to the Fankboner family; Elizabeth, who became the 
wife of John Kilgore ; Morris, who married Elizabeth Naber ; Margaret 
Jane, who married Abram Carr (see sketch of A. W. Carr) ; George 
"W., who married Mary E. Stallard ; and Sarah, who married George 
Eckfield. Upon the death of his wife, George K. Fankboner married 
Matilda Webb, and two sons were born — ^Webster and Joseph, the 
former marrying Retta Fairbanks and the latter Minnie Havens. Mrs. 
Carr and Joseph Fankboner are still living in Grant county; some of 
the others are living in Ohio. Morris Fankboner was one time sheriff 
of the county. 

Levi L. Fankboner married Rachel Jane, daughter of David and 
Mary M. (Jones) Moreland, August 20, 1852. They always had their 
home in the vicinity of Fairmount. Mrs. Fankboner was descended 
from Methodist ministers on both sides of the house, and they have 
always been identified with the Methodist church, attending services 
in Jonesboro and Fairmount. She had a brother, Ellis J. Moreland 
(married Luvenia Winans), who recently died in Newcastle, and her sis- 
ters are : Melinda, who married George Thorn ; Mahala, who married D. 
D. Ward; Sarah Elizabeth, who married William Winans. The sisters 
are all living at Fairmount. 

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Levi L. Fankboner are : Morris 
Kilgore, who died in infancy ; Sedora Jane, who married E. L. McDonnell 
and died in Michigan ; Mary Martinette, who died in childhood ; Sarah 
Romain, who married first Sanford McKinstry and second Eugene Mul- 
len, and has one son, Terry Lewis McKinstry, who married Luella Tenny ; 
Lucy Adelaide married Charles E. Sisson and has one daughter, Dora 
Alice Sisson; Lura Belle, who married twice, first William Smith and 
after his death M. F. Tackett, and has one son, Ara R. Smith, by her 



656 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

first marriage, and by her second husband three sons, William, ilarvin 
and Walker Tackett; and Ozi-o Groce. 

Never having known his brother Morris, the oldest of the children. 
Ozro G. Fankbouer, the youngest, is the son who pei-petuates the fam- 
ily name, and sometimes it is "Boner" they call him. ]Mr. Fankboner 
was married April 2, 1891, to Effie Howell* and they have one daugh- 
ter, Lois Ozro Fankboner. While Mr. Fankboner still has his mother, 
Mrs. Fankboner 's only living ancestor is Mrs. Elizabeth Howell. In 
their years of married life JMr. and Mrs. Fankboner have had a varied 
experience, living both in town and in the counti-y, and he has been 
employed on the railroad as well as on the farm, and two or three times 
has been established in the baker trade. In the present year 1913 Fair- 
mount people are supplied with Fankboner 's bread and pastry. The 
Fankboners occupy their own brick building. 

ilr. Fankboner does any part of the bakery business or drives the 
wagon in the sale of the product, and IMrs. Fankboner can wrap more 
bread and send away more pleased customers than any one he could 
secure at the counter. There is demand for Fankboner pastry spe- 
cialties, and few men work more hours out of every twenty-four than 
0. G. Fankboner. He will go on the wagon or take a turn at baking, 
and the farm will never again tempt him. 

ilrs. Rachel Jane Fankboner, his mother, by terms of the will of 
her husband, who died May 10, 1910, is sole owner of the Fankboner 
farm on Back creek (see Omnibus chapter), which her husband owned 
many years, and it was always one of the inviting countrysides, an 
attractive house overlooking Back creek. Recently it was burned, a 
misfortune to the whole community, for it was always a beauty spot. 
Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Fankboner have not lived on the farm for several 
years, and she occupies a commodious home in Fainnount. 

The Fankboner farm ad.ioins Back creek, and while the family were 
not Friends, in the old days of the Northern Quarterl.v meeting of 
Friends, Mr. Fankboner was forced to patrol his fences as there were 
so many horses hitched along them and sometimes whole panels of the 
fence were .jerked down, so that it was a wise precaution for him to 
watch them. In this occupation he would visit with fanners from all 
over the country in attendance at the meetings who sought places to 
tie their horses, and Mr. Fankboner was really glad when the June 
meeting there was a thing of the past. The story is elsewhere told about 
him hanging venison in a tree on the meeting-house the first 
time he ever attended Quaker meeting at Back creek. John and Daniel 
Fankboner were the two brothers living in Grant county when George 
K. Fankboner arrived, and thus he did not come into the wilderness 
absolutely among strangers, although he came early into the new coun- 
try. Mrs. Carr is now the oracle of the Fankboner family in Grant 
county. 

David L. II. Pearson. Five miles southeast of the City Square of 
Marion, on the Soldiers' Home pike, in Center township, is located 
Cedars Farm, a property that has been brought to a high state of ciilti- 
vation through the industry, enterprise and good management of its 
owner. David L. H. Pearson, one of Grant county's old and honored 
residents. Although not a native of Grant county, he has lived here 
since infancy, and his long and honorable career has been one made 
conspicuous by upright dealing and fidelity to the duties of citizenship. 
He was born in Clinton county. Ohio, February 7, 1836, and is a son 
of Jonathan aiid Violet fllaugha") Pear.sou. 

The parents of Mr. Pearson were born in the mountain country of 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 657 

Virginia, and were both taken from the Old Dominion State as children 
to Clinton county, Ohio. There they were reared and educated, grow- 
ing up in the same vicinity, and were eventually married. In Sep- 
tember, 1836, the same year as that in which occurred the birth of their 
son David L. H., they came to Grant county, Indiana, and settled in 
Center township, settling down in pioneer style to clear a farm from 
the wilderness. They became highly respected people of their com- 
munity, succeeded in developing a good property, and reared a family 
of twelve children, as follows: William H., Thomas, David L. H., Isaac, 
who died in army during Civil war, John, Matilda, Polly A., Rebecca J., 
Susan, Elizabeth, Bvaline and Sarah. Of these three are living at 
this time — David L. H., John, and Thomas, who is now 84 years of age. 

David L. H. Pearson was reared on the home farm in Center town- 
ship, and secured his early education in the primitive subscription schools 
of his day. subsequently supplementing this by 45 days' attendance at 
the first public school lin Center township, which was held in a log school- 
house. During this time his agricultural training was not neglected, 
for when he was not engaged at his studies in the short winter terms, 
he was assisting his father in farm work. He was married at the age of 
twenty-one years, and at that time began to farm on his own account, 
and so continued throughout his active career. His present property, 
a well-cultivated tract of 187 acres, is one of the most valuable in the 
township, having been improved with good buildings and equipment. 
As his children have grown to manhood and womanhood, he has pre- 
sented them with land and financial assistance, enabling them to start 
their careers under favoring circumstances. An honorable man of busi- 
ness, his transactions have ever been of legitimate character, and he has 
never been engaged in a lawsuit of any kind. As one of the men who 
are worthily representing the best type of Grant county citizenship, he 
is worthy of the high esteem and regard in which he is universally held. 

^Ir. Pearson was married in September, 1857, to Miss Susanna 
Griffin, who was bom and reared in Center township, and three chil- 
dren were born to this union. Of these one died at the age of two years ; 
Martin R. was given a common school education and is now a farmer in 
Center township; and Louisa is the wife of James B. Wilson of this 
touTiship. Mrs. Pearson died in September, 1880, and on Jlarch 13, 
1883, 'Sir. Pearson was married to Mrs. Mary E. (Carter) Brad- 
ford, the widow of Benjamin Bradford. She was born in Washington 
township. Grant county, Indiana, August 21, 1853, was educated in the 
district schools there, and married Benjamin Bi-adford. They had two 
sons : Lewis E., who is engaged in farming in Washington township ; 
and Jay B., a resident of Laporte, Indiana. Mr. and ilrs. Pearson have 
one son: Burr W., a graduate of the district schools and of Marion 
Normal College, who was educated in telegraphy and followed that voca- 
tion for some time, but is now a merchant at Adrian, Michigan. He 
married Eda Sangster, of Wauseon, Ohio, and they have a son and a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pearson are members of Griffin Chapel of the Meth- 
odist church, and Mrs. Pearson also holds membership in the Women's 
Christian Temperance Union, her husband also being an ardent sup- 
porter of prohibition. He was a charter member of Necessity Grange, 
and for a number of years served as an overseer of that order. In 
political matters he is independent, although other things being equal 
he gives his support to the prohibition candidate. 

William Penn Bradford. A preface is hardly needed for the fol- 
lowing article concerning one of the ablest of Grant county farmer cit- 
izens, and a family which properly belongs among both the first and the 



658 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

best. As will be seen three generations have lived on Grant county soil, 
not including the children of William P. Bradford, so that Grant county 
really spells home to a large number of Bradfords. Theirs have been 
lives of fruitful toil, of unselfish sharing of burdens, and mutual help- 
fulness and esteem. 

William, Penn Bradford of Centennial Place in Washington town- 
ship — the farm having been his since 1876 — was bom October 11, 1853, 
within a short distance of his present home, and his life has been spent 
in one neighborhood. He was married in 1875 to Miss Ida Alice Arm- 
strong, who died ^lay 6, 1886. The children born to them are ilrs. 
Nora May Beekman, Mrs. Louella Burris, Charles J. Bradford, Albert 
E. Bradford, Mrs. Carrie Dell JMaynard, Earl Blaine Bradford and 
Vernon Eber Bradford. i\Irs. Bradford, the mother of these children, 
was born after the death of her father, although James C. Stallings, 
who married her mother, Mrs. Jane Armstrong, was always as a father 
to her, and as a grandfather to her children. There was a wide-spread 
belief that there was virtue in the breath of a woman who had never 
seen her father, and before and after marriage Sirs. Bradford was fre- 
quentl.v importuned to blow her breath in the mouths of children 
afflicted with thrush — an idea kindred to another about measuring 
children for small growth, which prevailed in the country. While she 
never had a fee for such service, she performed the office for many who 
came to her with afflicted children. 

Mr. Bradford was left with a family of small children, and the 
following year he was married to Miss Nancy Jane Moore, and their 
children are: Mrs. Rosa Ethel King. Mrs. Lily Esta Weaver, Wilbur 
Arthur Bradford, Mrs. Hazel Ann White, Homer Leroy, Nellie Marie, 
Minnie Belle, Merlie Gladys and Belva Bernice. Thus there were seven 
children in the older familj^, and nine in the younger, seven sons and 
nine daughters. 

In the family of Mr. Bradford's grandfather, George Bradford, 
who had come into Grant county soon after it was organized, were four 
sons and twelve daughters, all having the same mother, and all of whom 
lived to bring up families, and as all of the children of his family are 
living, and in the next generation are seventeen grandchildren, it is 
a large family circle when all are gathered at Centennial Place. While 
the seven older children had a different mother, Mrs. Bradford came 
into the home when they were small, and to them she is mother. All 
the children were given a common school education, the girls learn- 
ing domestic science at home, and the boys learning up-to-date farm- 
ing methods at Centennial Place — one of the best managed farmsteads 
in Grant county. 

Wlien Jlr. Bradford went into debt for his farm in the Centennial 
year, he was young and determined to win and while he has reared a 
large family and has had sickness and its attendant expenses, his ambi- 
tion has been to make breadwinners of all his children, and they were 
thrown on their own resources early, and like the older generation of 
sixteen Bradford children, those who have taken up the struggle for 
themselves are winning the same success. 

AVilliam Penn Bradford is a son of William R. Bradford and Eliza- 
beth (Gaines) Bradford, and his father who died in 1895, had reached 
seventy-nine years, while his mother who died in 1911, has been an 
octogenarian for four years. The old home of the family adjoins Cen- 
tennial Place and is owned by H. L. Bradford. There are Bradford 
farms all around, and J\lr. Bradford recently commented on the size of 
them. Only a few years ago they were all large farms, but in the process 
of settlement of estates, the shares of heirs causing the smaller farm 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 659 

areas, gi'adually Grant county is shifting into conditions surrounding 
older countries — broken farms on account of the division of property. 

Mrs. Bradford is a daughter of Patterson and Amanda (Forest) 
Moore, and both are of pioneer Washington township stock. While the 
name "William Penn" suggests Quaker parentage, many of the Brad- 
fords are in fact Friends, but the W. P. Bradford family are members 
of the Methodist congregation at Morris Chapel, although Fairview Wes- 
leyau church overlooks Centennial Place. Fairview is the original Brad- 
ford farm — the farm now owned by Mrs. Nancy Bradford having been 
named from the church, and the Bradford family burying ground where 
all the family pioneers lie buried is near Fairview church and in plain 
view from Centennial Place. There has never been a family in Grant 
county of stronger personal characteristics than the original Bradford 
family, and for years they have met in annual reunions, commemorating 
their ancestry and having pride in the Bradford family coat-of-arms m 
early American history. 

There are many practical farmers in Grant county, but none have 
better understood the soil requirements and capabilities than Mr. Brad- 
ford who has always been a "farm agent" on his own acount. His crop 
rotation always includes oats which he thinks places the gi-ound in better 
condition for a meadow instead of following com with wheat, and in 
feeding out stock he finds oats worth as much as corn or any other grain, 
therefore, his meadow land is always level. Centennial Place is undu- 
lating and well adapted to meadow farming, and the stock kept there 
renders plenty of pasture a necessity. While Mr. Bradford is a con- 
servative citizen and has no political ambition, he is abreast of the times 
and in favor of good road advantages. The farm is well supplied with 
buildings, and the modern house built in 1910 is one of the best arranged 
farm houses in the country. The daily mail and telephone keeps the 
family in touch with things, and water — soft and hard and warm and 
cold — only a faucet to turn, and natural gas in abundance with acetylene 
lights all over the house — why should the Bradfords move to town? All 
the improved machinery has been installed on the farm and all the 
conveniences are in evidence in the house, and as yet the domestic service 
or farm labor problems have not touched Centennial Place. The dinner- 
time guest will always find the table well spread, and with young children 
in the home the future will take care of itself for many years. 

Rev. J. William Richards. A representative in a younger genera- 
tion of the prominent Richards family so long identified with Grant 
county. Rev. J. William Richards, has for a number of years been one of 
the leading farmers in both Grant and Delaware counties, his home 
being in Washington township of Delaware county, and close to the 
Grant county line. On December 6, 1902, he was licensed and ordained 
b}' the Harmony Primitive Baptist church at Matthews, and has been 
an active local preacher of his church for the past ten yeai's, having 
been pastor of the Harmony church since 1904. His Washington town- 
ship homestead comprises one hundred and sixty acres of land, and he 
also owns one hundred and eighty acres in Jefferson township of Grant 
county. Mr. Richards is very progressive in matters of agi-iculture, 
does what is known as mixed farming, raises good crops and feeds them 
all to his live stock, and the substantia] improvements about his places 
indicate the style of thrift and industry employed by him. His home 
farm has a splendid barn, painted in a tasteful color, and nearby is the 
comfortable white house of ten rooms. His Jefferson township farm is 
improved with a large stock and grain barn. All his land is under 
cultivation, and is well cultivated and well stocked. 



660 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

J. W. Richards was born in Jefferson township of Grant county, 
December 1, 1860, and is the first son and second child of Mr. L. G. 
Richards, whose career as one of the pioneers of Grant county is sketched 
at length on other pages of this publication. 

Rev. Richards grew up on his father's farm, was educated in the 
public schools, and from early manhood has given most of his time to 
farming. An interested student of the bible, and of religious problems 
and having shown much talent as a church worker, he devoted himself 
diligently to the preparation for work as a local minister, and since 
his ordination has been one of the spiritual leaders in his community. 

ilr. Richards was married in Delaware county, in 1883, to Emma 
Z. Harris, who was born in Washington township of Delaware county, 
January 11, 1866. Her parents, John M. and Margaret (Broyles) Harris 
were also natives of Delaware county, and their respective parents 
probably came from Virginia in the early pioneer times. Mr. and Mrs. 
Harris grew up and were married in Washington to■s^'nship, started life 
as farmers, and Mrs. Harris died on the old liomestead when a little 
past sixty j-ears of age. Mr. Harris is still living on his fine farm of 
about two hundred acres, and though more than seventy years of age, is 
still active and gives personal supervision to his affairs. His wife was 
a devoted Methodist, but he has held to no church creed. He is a Repub- 
lican in politics. There were six sons and three daughters in the Harris 
family, of whom one son and one daughter died after marriage, each 
leaving children, and all those now living are married and have families. 
Mrs. Richards grew up in Delaware county, had a common school educa- 
tion, and since her marriage has proved herself a capable housewife and 
devoted mother. To their marriage have been born four children : Orpha, 
died at the age of two and a half years. T. Clayton, born in September, 
1884, now occupies a part of his father's Delaware county farm, and by 
his marriage to Esta Whiteneck, a Grant county girl, has two sons, John 
L. G. Richards, now eight years old and Forrest Charles Richards, one 
month old. Gladys is living at home and a graduate of the Matthews 
high school in the class of 1911. Dilver W., is attending the high 
school at home. Mr. Richards and the children are also members and 
workers in the Harmony church, and Mr. Richards in politics is a 
Democrat. 

John Shields, one of the old and honored residents of Franklin 
township. Grant county, Indiana, now retired from active pursuits, is 
a member of the good old Irish family of that name, always well known 
as devout Presbyterians in their native land. A little more than a 
century and a half ago, there lived at Coot Hill, one William Shields. 
The elder of two brothers, he sold his birthright to the younger, and 
when still little more than a lad bid farewell to his friends and relatives 
and embarked on a sailing vessel for America, arriving at Philadelphia 
some years prior to the Revolutionary war. There he met and married 
a Pennsylvania girl, and began his married life as a farmer in the Key- 
stone state, where his industrious habits soon earned him prosperity. 
He reared a family of seven sons and two daughters, and later all of 
the family moved "to Augusta county, Virginia, where William Shields 
and his wife passed their last days, dying in the faith of the Presby- 
terian church. Their children all grew to maturity and were married, 
establishing homes and becoming substantial people of their several 
communities, and the sons enlisted in the Colonial army, assisting their 
country in its successful fight for independence. 

Of the nine children born to William Shields, William Shields, 
Jr., the gi-andfather of John Shields, was born in Philadelphia, Penn- 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 661 

sylvania, about 1750. He early learned the trade of tailor, and aceom- 
pauied the family in 1770 to Augusta county, Virginia, where, with his 
six brothers, he enlisted in Washington's army as a member of a Vir- 
ginia regiment. He continued to serve throughout the war, at the 
close of which he returned to Virginia and resumed the trade of tailor, 
going from house to house and measuring, cutting and sewing the 
clothes for the families of his vicinity, as was the custom in those days. 
He continued to follow his trade until his death, which occurred either 
in Virginia or Pennsylvania, when he was not yet seventy years of 
age. He married a Miss Frame, a Virginia girl, and it is thought that 
she died in her native state. Both Mr. and Mrs. Shields were probably 
Presbyterians. They were the parents of five children, namely: Wil- 
liam (III) ; Joseph and Preston, who served in the War of 1812; Ann 
and Margaret. . All lived to advanced ages, and all were married and 
reared families except Joseph. 

Preston Shields, son of William Shields, Jr., and father of John 
Shields, was born in Augusta couut.y, Virginia, about the year 1790, 
and as a young man enlisted from that county in the War of 1812, 
becoming an orderly sergeant in a division of Scott's army, under 
Colonel McDowell. In early life he had been engaged in teaming 
between Augusta county and Richmond, Virginia, and it may be that 
he drove a team during his army service. At the close of the war he 
returned to his home, and in 1815 migrated to Green county, Ohio, 
where he began life as a farmer in the wilds, also driving a team to 
Cincinnati. He was there married to Delila Fulkerson, who was born, 
reared and educated in Frederick county, Virginia, and who had gone 
to Green county, Ohio, about 1810 or 1812 with her parents, Richard- 
son and Clara (Moore) Fulkerson. lu 1848 Mr. and Mrs. Shields 
migrated to Indiana, purchasing slightly improved land in Richland 
township, Jay county, where they spent the remainder of their lives. 
Mr. Shields jjassed away, aged eighty years, while his widow 
away seven years later, being seventy-nine years old. Mr. Shields 
a Whig and later a Republican, but took no active part in party 
They reared a fine family of stalwart children, as follows: WiUiam 
( IV ) , who was twice married and was a farmer in Jay county, Indiana ; 
James, who was married, and died in Franklin township, Grant 
county, when seventy-nine years of age ; John, of this review ; David, 
who died at the age of eighteen years; Joseph, who died when two and 
one-half years of age; Benjamin, who was a soldier in the 19tli Volun- 
teer Infantry, and died during the war, in Washington, D. C. ; Clara, 
who is the wife of William Wright, of Dunkirk, Indiana ; Hannah, who 
died after her marriage to Siras Bargdol; and Richard, the youngest, 
who is single and lives in the South. 

John Shields was born in Green county, Ohio, July 21, 1826, and 
was there reared to agricultural pursiiits and also engaged in sawmill- 
ing. He was married December 6, 1849, to Araminta Jane Wroe, who 
was born in Frederick county, Virginia, in 1829, and came to Ohio with 
her parents, Benjamin and Elizabeth (Pagett) Wroe. They had come 
to Somerset, Ohio, as early as 1831 and in 1836 settled in Green county, 
Ohio, where they spent the remainder of their lives. 

In 1851, John Shields, with his young bride, came to Grant county, 
Indiana, on a visit and they were so favorably impressed with the coun- 
try that in February, 1852, they returned, to make this their perma- 
nent home. They located at what is now Roseburg, Franklin township, 
where Mr. Shields secured a one-fourth interest in a sawmill, the coun- 
try at that time being almost entirely covered with good timber. A 
man of industry and energy, he accumulated some small capital, and 



662 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

in 1855 made his first investment in farming land, purchasing a tract 
of seventy-four acres of partly improved property. This he later 
sold, with his milling interest and some land he owned in Jay county, 
and bought eighty acres of land in another part of Franklin township. 
Subsequently, in 1866 he bought a better tract of eighty acres, in sec- 
tion 16, on which he settled after the war, and which he made one of 
the best farms in Grant county. For forty years Mr. Shields made this 
farm his home, erecting handsome buildings, and installing improve- 
ments and equipments, and at the time of his retirement was consid- 
ered one of the most substantial men of his community. Although now 
eighty-seven years of age, he is alert and active, and, having lived a 
life of temperance and probity, still weighs 165 pounds. He is a pleas- 
ing conversationalist, and his memory is testified by his entertaining 
reminiscences of early days. 

air. Shields is a veteran of the Civil war. On August 10, 1862, 
he enlisted for a sex-vice of three years in Company C, Twelfth Regi- 
ment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, being attached to Sherman's Corps. 
He participated in every battle, skirmish and march from Missionar.y 
Ridge to Bentouville, North Carolina, his record including twenty-one 
battles. Although always a brave and valiant soldier, to be found in 
the thickest of the fight, he escaped with a slight wound on the side 
of his nose, this being caused by a ball which glanced from a limb 
of an oak tree. As he remembers it, his hardest fought battle was that 
at Atlanta, July 28, 1864, when the men stood face to face and fought 
it out until the enemy were driven from the field. Mr. Shields never 
yielded to the temptations of whisky while in the sei^vice, and, in fact, 
has not touched a drop since 1855. He was honorably discharged June 
8, 1865, with a record which compares favorably with that of any sol- 
dier who participated in the great war between the North and the 
South. 

On December 5, 1849, in Green county, Ohio, Mr. Shields was mar- 
ried to a boyhood sweetheart, whom he met when but twelve years old, 
Araminta Jane Wroe. She proved a valued and loving helpmeet, and 
in her death, which occurred in 1909, at the age of eighty years, the 
community lost a kindly Christian woman, a devout Quakeress, and 
one who was widely known for her many charities. Mr. and Mrs. 
Shields became the parents of the following children: Clarinda, who 
died at the age of eighteen years, a young woman of much promise; 
Araminta, wife of Allen J. Overman, a grocer of Marion, who has four 
children, all married except one: Sarah M., the wife of Dr. N. Pierce 
Haines, of Marion, a physician, at the Insane Hospital, and has a fam- 
ily ; Maggie, the wife of Harry Hoadley, living at Spokane, Washing- 
ton, wlio has four sons and one daughter: Prestina, the wife of Wil- 
liam Howe, a farmer of near Landessville, Indiana, and has two daugh- 
ters; and Benjamin W., twin of Prestina, one of the best-known horse 
buyers and dealers of Grant county, who married Clara Parks, and has 
had three sons and two daughters, of wh^m two sons and one daughter 
survive. Mr. Shields has eleven grandsons, ten granddaughters, and 
twentj'-one great-grandchildren. Mr. Shields is a Prohibitionist in his 
political views. He is public-spirited and progressive, and at all times 
is ready to support measures for the good of his community. 

Ollin Gordon. Barring a brief two years' time in which he was 
engaged with his father in the grocery business, Ollin Gordon has, dur- 
ing his entire active career of something more than twenty years, been 
identified with the enterprise in which he is now occupied — the furni- 
ture and house-furnishing business. In April, 1895, Mr. Gordon estab- 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 663 

lished himself in Gas City, opening a small shop in association with 
Mr. J. E. Ward at the corner of Second and Main sti'eets. Since that 
time his advance in the conmiercial circles of the city has been rapid 
and today he has a leading position among the most prominent and 
prosperous business men of the communitj^: Shrewd, careful and con- 
servative in all his business dealings, he has conducted his affairs in a 
manner conducive to the best results, and his standing in the city 
today is one that he has undeniably earned, and of which he may well 
be proud. 

Ollin Gordon was born in Grant county, Mills township, August 8, 
1869, and he is the son of Seth and Sarah (Jay) Gordon. Seth Gordon 
was a native son of Henry county, Indiana, boi-n there in the year 1831 
on the 14th day of July. He was for years engaged in farming in Grant 
county, later interesting himself actively in the grocery business, and 
was connected with a prosperous grocery business in Gas City, Grant 
county, until a short time before his death, on his sixty-seventh birth- 
day anniversary, in 1898. The mother was born on what is now the 
Infirmai-y Farm in JMills township, on January 23, 1843, and she is now 
living in the home of her son, Ollin Gordon of this review. She and 
her husband were both birthright Quakers and both had served as 
elders and overseei*s in the church for many years. The mother is yet 
active in the work of the church, and still continues an influence for 
good in her community. Mrs. Gordon was a daughter of James and 
Lydia (Hollingsworth) Jay, early settlers in Grant county, whither 
they came from their native state, South Carolina, in early life. They 
were of the old pioneer stock of the county, and they lived in a time 
when primitive civilization was at its height in Grant county. In about 
the year 1807 they settled in Vermillion county, Ohio, there residing 
until they settled in Grant county. They, too, were birthright Quakers 
and passed their lives in the church of their fathers. 

Ollin Gordon is the youngest child but one of his parents, and he is 
today the sole surviving member. The other died young, and he alone 
was left to cheer them in their declining years, his mother making 
her present home with him. 

Mr. Gordon had his education in the district schools, such as were 
provided in his boyhood in Grant county, and when the Marion Normal 
College was opened he became one of the first students enrolled there, 
graduating from its commercial department among the first with the 
class of 1892. Since that time Mr. Gordon has been steadily engaged 
in business. 

The first enterprise with which Mr. Gordon identified himself was 
his father's grocery business, as has been stated already. For two 
years he continued with the elder Gordon, and while he was a deal of 
assistance to his father, it is also true that he acquired much in the 
way of practical knowledge of business management that stood him in 
excellent stead in the years of his earlier private business experience. 

It was in 1895 that Mr. Gordon became established in the house fur- 
nishing business with J. E. Ward. The two were practically mthout 
capital, but they were young and courageous, possessing a deal of energy 
and ambition, and fortified with Mr. Gordon's business training, both in 
college and in his father's establishment, they were better equipped than 
many who start in with more of money at their command and less of 
these other assets. After a year of business activity, Mr. Gordon bought 
out his associate, Mr. Ward, and since that time has operated, inde- 
pendently. He remained at the old stand on Second and Main streets 
for a year, then moved to one room in the Peele building on Main street. 
Here "he has continued, and from time to time additions of one room 



664 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

have been made to the place, as the business expanded and demanded 
more space for its proper management. Mr. Gordon has not hesitated 
to branch out whenever he saw an opportunity for it, and he has from 
lirst to last carried on an advertising campaign that has resulted in a 
continued growth of the business, making necessary additions to floor 
space, warehouse room and all the appurtenances necessary in the con- 
duct of a thriving fui-niture and house furnishing enterprise. In the 
past six years his advancement has been particularly rapid and substan- 
tial, and his place today devotes one entire room to carpets and rugs, one 
to upholstered goods, one to china and other household wares, and another 
in which staples in house furnishings are to be found in plenty. He 
carries a fine class of goods, his trade being of a conservative and dis- 
criminating character, and his place is considered the acme of complete- 
ness in his especial line in Gas City. The place itself is a building of 
two stories, with sixty-six bj' seventy foot frontage, all of which is occu- 
pied by the business. An overflow wareroom also adds to the floor space 
required b.y the business, this being located at the corner of First and 
JMain streets. 

As a business man, it will not be gainsaid that Mr. Gordon has been 
a very successful man. His progress has been steady and consistent with 
the most conservative and business like advancement, so that he is 
properly regarded as one of the safe and altogether reliable business 
men of the city. 

ilr. Gordon was married in Jonesboro, Indiana, to Miss Elizabeth 
Eaton, a native daughter of the state of Illinois, where she was reared 
and educated. Her parents are both deceased, ilr. and JMrs. Gordon 
have no children of their own, but they have an adopted son, C. Fred- 
erick, born April 5, 1910. 

As members of the Friends church of Jonesboro, Mr. and Mrs. Gor- 
don have carried on the church relations of their parents and grand- 
parents, and they are among the most useful and active people in that 
church today. 

A Republican in his politics, Mr. Gordon has served his fellow men 
well in Gas City, for ten years having been a member of the City Coun- 
cil. He is a citizen of splendid t.vpe, and has borne his full share of the 
civic burdens of the community in all the years of his residence here. He 
is a member of the Gas City lodge of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and has filled all chairs in the local order, while he has also 
represented his lodge in the Grand Lodge of the Order. 

John B. King. The late John B. King was born in Washington 
township. Grant county, Indiana, on ]May 29, 1843, and he died at his 
farm home in Mill township on August 4. 1913, when little past seventy 
years of age. AH his life had been spent in Grant county, with but 
slight exception, and he was one of the best known and esteemed men of 
the county during his life time. He is remembered, and long will be, 
as one of" the substantial and worthy citizens of the community. 

Mr. King was a son of John and Elizabeth (Bloxliam) King, natives 
of Virginia, where the father was born in 1805 and the mother in 1800. 
The father' was a son of John and Sarah King, who passed their 
lives in Virginia, and who were birthright Quakers and exemplary 
citizens all their davs. John King, the father of the late John B. King, 
was a small boy when his parents died in Virginia, and he was early 
bound out as an apprentice to learn the trade of a tanner. He com- 
pleted his apprenticeship and in early manhood married, coming to 
Ohio after the birth of the two eldest children in his family. That 
state did not long claim his attention, and he soon found himself estab- 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 665 

lished in Grant county. This was in the early thirties, and in Wash- 
ington township he entered eighty acres of what seemed desirable land. 
He made a good deal of improvements in the place and then sold advan- 
tageously, intending at the time to go to Iowa to live. Their plan was 
altered, however, through the protracted illness of their son John, the 
subject of this review, and they settled in Marion, Grant county, Indi- 
ana, instead, the father once more resuming his work as a tanner, which 
he had discontinued when he settled on his Washington township farm. 
In about 1850 he went to Arcana and established a tannery which he 
operated successfully until war times, even continuing it through a part 
of the war period, when he sold it and retired to a small farm in Alill 
township. Here he died on October 5, 1867, when he was sixty-two 
years of age. His widow later went to make her home with a daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Sarah Nelson, and she died there on December 18, 1874, when 
she lacked twenty days of having reached her seventy-tifth birthday 
anniversary. She was a daughter of William and Mary Bloxham, who 
were native Virginians, living all their lives as farming people in that 
state. They, too, were Quakers. John King and his wife were birthright 
Quakers, though in later life they became associated with the Methodist 
Episcopal church. In this body they were active and prominent, 
Mr. King becoming a class leader and holding that place for some years 
prior to his death. His devoted wife was in perfect accord with him 
in all the issues of life, and they lived happily and to excellent purpose, 
being Christian people of many lovable qualities. Of their three sons 
and three daughters, two died young, and the names of the six were as 
follows: Jonathan, William S., Ruth, Mary, Sarah, John B., of this 
review. Ruth and Mary died in girlhood, but the other four reached 
mature years and reared families of their own. All are now deceased. 

John B. King gi'ew up on the home farm in Grant county and he 
found his early employment in work on the farm and in his father 's tan- 
nery until the outbreak of the war caused the discontinuing of the 
tannery activities. On October 10, 1862, he was mustered in as a 
private in Company M, Fifth Indiana Cavalry, and with his command 
went to the front, and so continued until the close of the war, being hon- 
orably discharged in September, 1865. All through that period he 
proved in many ways his gallantry and devotion to the cause in which 
he had enlisted, and he participated in practically every engagement of 
importance in which his regiment was active. Exposure and the gen- 
eral hardships of war on several occasions caused his disability and con- 
finement in hospitals, though he was never wounded in action. For 
years he was a member of the Jonesboro Post of the G. A. R. 

After the war Mr. King settled down to farm life on the farm of 
his wife in Mill to^^Tiship, continuing there until 1897, when the family 
removed to Jonesboro, three years later coming to Gas City, but retiring 
to the old farm home some few months prior to his death, it being his 
wish that his last days might be spent there. 

Mr. King was a Republican and a member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. A good citizen all his days, he had his full share in the 
civic activities of whatever community he lived in, and he enjoyed the 
esteem and high regard of his contemporaries and is still remembered 
with genuine affection by those who knew him in the various relations 
of life. 

On March 17, 1867, Mr. King was married to Miss Elizabeth Over- 
man, born in Mill township on the old Overman homestead on Septem- 
ber IS, 1840, and there reared and educated. She was the eldest child 
of Jesse and Jane (Griffin) Overman, an account of which family will 
be found elsewhere in this work. Since the death of Mr. King, Mrs. 



666 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

King has maintained her residence in the Gas City home, where she took 
up her abode after the passing of her husband on the okl home place in 
Mill township, and she is still active and energetic at the age of seventy- 
two. She still has ownership of the Mill township property, which 
is a fine place of eighty acres, and some desirable property in Jones- 
boro as well as the Gas City property, make her independent. She is 
the mother of the following children : 

Ida J. is the wife of Lincoln Lamb. They live on the mother's 
farm iu Mill township and their children are Charles, Earl and Flor- 
ence, the latter the ^^'ife of Benjamin Stoelnvell. She is the oldest of 
the three children. She has one child, Chelsey James. Charles King is 
married and has one son, Charles II. James, the second son, of John 
and Elizabeth King, died after his second marriage, at the age of 
thirty-seven .years. His first wife was Elizabeth Brewer, and this 
marriage was without issue. Two children blessed the second union. 
Rea, the fii'st born, died young, and Harry B. now resides with his 
paternal grandmother, Mrs. King, and is attending the city schools. 
Jesse Albert King died aged fifteen years. 

Mrs. King is a stanch member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and still retains her membership in the Griffin M. E. Chapel of Center 
township, where she united with the church many years ago. She is 
a woman of many virtues and is one whose life has been a shining 
example in the community all her days. 

Lee C. Frank. When Gas City was beginning its development as a 
commercial center, Lee C. Frank identified himself with the new com- 
munity, and set up in a business way there. For twenty years, since 
January, 1893, he has been a citizen of that community, and in that 
time a number of distinctions have come to him as a business man and 
factor in local affairs. The official records of the city will always give 
him a place as the first treasurer after the incorporation under a city 
charter. His chief business has been as a funeral director and em- 
balmer, and he keeps a first-class establishment with perfect facilities 
for giving service to his patients. His establishment contains two hearses, 
he has a complete line of caskets, and for eleven years, from 1893, at 
the beginning of his career here, until 1904, conducted a furniture store 
in connection with his undertaking business. For five years Mr. Frank 
was vice president of the First State Bank of Gas City. His election to 
the office of city treasurer, after the incorporation, occurred in 189-4, 
and he continued to hold the office by successive reelection without any 
opposition candidates until January, 1912, resigning before the conclu- 
sion of his last term. He was elected on the Republican ticket, of which 
he has always been a stanch supporter, though as a matter of fact his 
choice for this office was one based upon personal fitness rather than 
on account of party considerations. 

Lee C. Frank was born in Troy, Miama county, Ohio, September 30, 
1867. He grew up in his native town and county, was reared on a farm, 
and after getting his schooling was employed in an undertaking estalilish- 
ment, an experience which gave him a thorough preparation for his 
chosen vocation. Mr. Frank is a son of Samuel and Charlotte Frank, 
who were born in the state of Ohio, and were married in Troy, where the 
father still lives. Samuel Frank, during his active career, was one of 
the very prominent men, not only in his home locality, but in the state, 
especiailv in Republican politics. As a young man he enlisted during 
the Civil war and went to the front with the One Hundred and Tenth 
Ohio Volunteer Infantrv. His regiment was in the Army of the Potomac. 
and he fought iu many of the great battles of the war, mainly in Yir- 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 667 

ginia, being out about three years. In a small skirmish in Virginia he 
was shot, a minie-ball passing through his left elbow, and the wound 
was of such a nature that he was discharged on account of disability and 
returned home. The vetei-au soldier soon became prominent in public 
affairs. He was elected sheriff of Miami county, then promoted to the 
office of county treasurer, and for ten years was in the United States 
Revenue service. In the meantime in a business way he had bought land 
and taken up farming. He served as postmaster at Troy during McKin- 
ley's administration, and for a number of years held the office of county 
commissioner. He was one of the leading and iuHuential Republicans 
for many years, a personal friend of President McKinley and of Gen- 
eral J. P. Warren Keiffer, the latter one of Ohio's notable public men. 
The elder Frank served as delegate to many state conventions, went 
through the national convention as a delegate on several occasions, and 
was twice a pi-esideutial elector. He has been long identified with Grand 
Army affairs and has attended nearly all the national reunions. He and 
his wife now live in a comfortable home at Troy. In that city he has 
served as alderman, and in other local offices, and has been township 
trustee. He and his wife are devout Methodists. Mr. Lee C. Frank was 
the only son and his three sisters are : Mabelle, wite of J. H. Scott, of 
Troy, and the mother of four children; Maude, wife of Rev. E. M. Kerr, 
a minister of the Christian church and they have one son and a daugh- 
ter; Florence, who lives at home in Troy, is a fine instrumental musi- 
cian, on the piano and pipe organ, and is a teacher of music and a 
leader in musical affairs in her home locality. 

Lee C. Frank was married in Gas City to Miss Bell "West, a daughter 
of James R. and Lucy T. West. The West family came from Ohio to 
Gas City during the early history of the latter locality, and her father 
was a hardware merchant for a number of years. He and his wife now 
live at Cleveland, Ohio. Mr. West was born in England. Mrs. Frank 
was bom in Elyria, Ohio, and was educated partly there and partly in 
the high school at Marion, Indiana. To their marriage the following chil- 
dren have been born: Margaret, who is now a sophomore in the high 
school; Richard, in the grade schools; Dorothy, also in school; William, 
in the second grade; and Robert, the youngest of the family. Mrs. 
Frank is a regular attendant of the Methodist church, and her husband 
is affiliated with the IMasonic Order, the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Improved Order of Red Men, and 
the Loyal Order of Moose. 

Isaiah Wall. Nearly three-fourths of a century ago the parents 
of this honored citizen established their residence in Grant county, 
and he is now one of the most venerable of the native sons of the county 
residing in Marion. He gave virtually his entire active career to agri- 
cultural pursuits, and is still the owner of a well improved and valu- 
able landed estate in his native township, besides his attractive resi- 
dence property in the city of Marion. His life has been replete with 
earnest and productive endeavor, he is known as a man of high ideals, 
broad views and impregnable integrity, and none has more secure 
vantage ground in popular confidence and esteem. He served as a 
member of the board of county commissioners for three years, retiring 
therefrom on the 1st of Janiiary, 1914, and this fact in itself vouches 
for his high standing in the county that has ever represented his 
home, and to the development and progress of which he has contributed 
with all of loyalty and liberality as an enterprising and appreciative 
citizen. 

On the old family homestead in Monroe township, this county, Mr. 



668 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Wall was born on the 24th of December, 1844, and thus he became a 
welcome Christmas arrival in the pioneer home of his parents, David 
and Sarah (Dwiggins) Wall, both of whom were born and reared in 
Clinton county, Ohio, where the respective families were founded in 
the pioneer epoch of the history of the state. The paternal grand- 
parents of the subject of this review were John and Mary (Mills) Wall, 
and both were natives of Peunsjdvania, where their marriage was sol- 
emnized and whence they finally removed to Ohio and numbered them- 
selves among the early settlers of Clinton county, where they passed 
the remainder of their lives. The maternal grandparents. Robert and 
Sarah (Starbuck) Dwiggins, were born and reared in North Carolina 
and were representatives of stanch Colonial stock. They likewise 
became pioneers of Clinton county, Ohio, which continued to be their 
home until death. 

David Wall came from Ohio to Indiana in the year 1837, making 
the trip on horseback. His object was to select a location for a home, 
and he made Grant county his destination. Here he entered claim to 
a tract of government land in Monroe township, and in 1840 he and 
his wife came to this pioneer homestead, which he reclaimed from the 
virgin wilds and developed into a productive farm. Both he and his 
wife passed practically the entire remaining period of their lives on 
this fine old homestead, and the names of both find enduring place 
on the roll of the honored pioneers of Grant county, where they lived 
and labored to goodly ends and where popular confidence and regard 
came to them with naught of qualification — a just tribute to their ster- 
ling worth of character. David Wall was born on the 1st of i\Iay, 1815, 
and thus was eight.y-eight years of age at the time of his death, which 
occurred in 1903. His wife, who was born on the 7th of June, 1817, 
was .summoned to eternal rest on the 7th of May, 1894, exactly one 
month prior ta the seventy-seventh anniversary of her birth. Of their 
three children, the eldest was Mills Wall, who sacrificed his life while 
serving as a gallant soldier of the Union in the Civil war. He was 
a member of Company M, Fifth Indiana Cavalry, was captured by the 
enemy in connection with the battle of Resaca, was held at Anderson- 
ville prison for some months, and died while confined as a pi'isouer of 
war at Florence, South Carolina. Isaiah Wall, of this review, was the 
second in order of birth of the three children. The youngest is Dr. 
Mahlon M. Wall, of Marion, a representative physician and surgeon 
of Grant county. The father was influential in his home township, and 
served at one time as its triistee. In polities he was first a Wliig and 
later a Republican. He and his wife were reared in the Quaker faith, 
but on coming to Indiana they adopted the United Brethren as the 
church of their choice, and while they did not become members they 
were regular attendants and took a deep interest in the welfare of the 
church and the cause of Christianity in general. 

Isaiah Wall continued to be actively identified with agricultural 
pursuits from his boyhood days until he had attained the age of sixty 
years. lie assisted in the reclamation and other work of the farm 
which his father obtained from the government, and his early educa- 
tional advantages were those afforded in the common schools of the 
pioneer days,— a discipline later to be rounded out through the medium 
of self application and through close association with practical duties 
and responsibilities of life. He continued to be associated with his 
father in the work and management of the home farm until he had 
attained to the age of twenty-two years, when he initiated his inde- 
pendent career on an adjoining farm. Energy', experience and close 
application gave results, and the years brought to him definite pros- 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 669 

perity, indicated in the development of one of the fine farms of Monroe 
township. He continued to purchase additional land as circumstances 
justified, and his home place, on which he resided for more than forty 
years and which he still o^vns, comprises three hundred and forty acres. 
He made the best of improvements on the place and gained reputation 
as one of the most progressive and broad-minded farmers of his native 
township. He has, at all times given evidence of his liberality, loyalty 
and public spirit by supporting enterprises and measures projected 
for the general good of the community, and his attitude in this respect, 
combined ^vith his invincible integrity in all of the relations of life, 
have given him high vantage place in the confidence and esteem of 
the people of his native county. In the autumn of 1906 Mr. Wall 
removed from his farm to Marion, and in this city he has an attractive 
modern home on West Third street, the same being a favored rendez- 
vous for the wide circle of friends who wish by this means to pay trib- 
ute to him and his devoted wife. After years of earnest toil and 
endeavor he is enjoying the well earned repose and comfort that are 
his due, and he and his gracious wife find themselves compassed by 
most pleasing associations and environment. 

jMr. Wall has by no means abated his energy and his vital interest 
in affairs. He takes a lively concern in public matters of a local order, 
and is a stalwart supporter of the cause of the Republican party. In 
1910 he was elected to represent the second district of his county on 
the board of county commissioners and he served in this important office 
until January 1, 1914, with characteristic loyalty and effectiveness. 
Within his incumbency of this office there occurred a vigorous contest 
between the liciuor and Prohibition elements in Grant county, and, 
as may naturally be inferred, his influence has been cast unequivocally 
in support of the local option policy and in favor of all things which 
make for morality and civic righteousness. Both he and his wife are 
devout members of the United Brethren church, and they still retain 
their active membership in Oak Chapel of this denomination, the same 
being situated near their old homestead farm. Of this church he served 
as a trustee for a number of years prior to his removal to Marion. 

On the 8th of November, 1866, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Wall to Miss Catherine Strange, who has been a resident of Grant 
county from the time of her birth and who is a daughter of George 
and Lydia Strange, both now deceased. Her father was a representa- 
tive agriculturist of Monroe township, and there her birth occurred. 
Of the seven children of ]\Ir. and Mrs. Wall two died in infancy. 
Carrie E. is the wife of Frank F. Seegar, of Greentown, Howard county; 
Clinton M. remains at the parental home, as does also Ada L. and Delia, 
the latter of whom is a successful and popular teacher in the high 
school in the city of Vincennes ; Claude D. is engaged in the drug busi- 
ness in the beautiful city of Spokane, Washington. 

Peter Solms. One of the well established business men of Gas City 
is Peter Solms, who at the corner of E and Third streets has for a num- 
ber of years conducted a grocery store and a butcher shop. His opera- 
tions have been carried on with a generous measure of success as a result 
therefrom, and he has come to be a property owner of considerable scope 
in the place. The entire block from D to E streets on Third street is his 
property, and in addition to the butcher shop and meat market he oper- 
ates a grocery and bakery-. Eighteen years ago he first opened a little 
shop in this vicinity, and the progress that he has made has been worthy 
of the quantity and quality of the interest he has put into his labors. 
Each year has witnessed the addition of something to his realty accumu- 



670 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

lations, and progressive ideas have been the mainspring of his business 
success. Mr. Solms does his own killing, so that the product of his 
market is second to none in the land, and the equipment of his shop is 
undeniably good. 

ilr. Solms is a native of Germany, born in Hesse Darmstadt, on No- 
vember 24, 1842, and he comes of old Hesse stock. He is a son of Adam 
Solms, who was thrice married. The mother of Mr. Solms was the first 
wife of Adam Solms, and she died when he was a small boy. The second 
wife of his father was Christina Howard and they lived and died in their 
native province, I\Ir. Solms being sixty-five j-ears of age when he passed 
away. His wife preceded him, and was at about middle life when her 
death came. The familj' was one of the Roman Catholic faith, and Mr. 
Solms is likewise a member of the church of his fathers. 

Peter Solms was the third child born to his parents. He has two 
sisters. One of them, Mrs. ^Margaret Straub, is now a resident of New 
York City, and Gertrude Sieben, the widow of Michael Sieben, is without 
issue, and is a resident of Gas City. Mr. Solms grew up in his native 
province and learned his trade there. All his life has been devoted to 
the butcher business. It was in the j-car 1863 that he took passage on 
a steamer and came to America. A short stay in New York sufficed him 
and he then came on to Grant county, where he had a married sister, 
Mrs. Gertrude Sieben, living in Monroe township. From that time to 
the present he has been in business at his present location, with what 
success has alreadj- been set forth. 

]\Ir. Solms was married in 1865 to Miss Lena Bower, in New York 
City. She was born in Prussia on May 1, 1843, and came to America 
when she was about six years old, settling in New York City with her 
parents, where she was reared. Her father was a merchant tailor and 
followed that line in New York all his days. Both parents died there 
in advanced age. They were members of the Roman Catholic church, 
and their daughter was also reared in the same faith. 

Mr. Solms has been twice married. His first wife died in New York 
City before ]\Ir. Solm moved to Gas City, the mother of nine children, 
but only three are now living. Peter, Jr., is engaged as a bookkeeper. 
He is married but without issue. Lillie married Ancel Fatter, and they 
live in New York City. They have two children. George is living in 
Brooklyn, New York. He is a coal, wood and lumber dealer, and a suc- 
cessful" business man. He is married and has three children. 

The second marriage of Mr. Solms took place in New York when iliss 
Barbara Raimer became his wife. She was born in Wurtemburg, Ger- 
many, on November 30, 1859, and was there reared and educated, com- 
ing to the United States in 1889. She continued a resident of New York 
City until her marriage. 

Jlr. Solms is one of the live men of the community, and is one of the 
leading citizens of the place. He is up and doing in all matters that 
have any bearing iipon the advancement of the town. Though he has 
never been an office seeker, he was named to represent the Fourth ward 
on the City Council, and though running far ahead of his ticket at the 
polls, he lost the election by three votes. His influence, however, has 
been quite as efficient and far reaching as it could be in an official 
capacity, and his citizenship is a credit to himself and the community. 

]\IiCHAEL Sieben. At Gas City one of the fine homes, on ample and 
attractive grounds, is occupied by i\Irs. Gertrude Sieben. widow of 
the late Michael Sieben, who for many years was prominent as a fa_rmer, 
land owner and business man, and at his death in November, 1897, left 
the memory of an upright man, a ,iust and kindly gentleman, and one 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 671 

whose good deeds in life follow him. Mr. and Mrs. Sieben came to 
Grant county more than forty years ago, and it was as a result of their 
united efforts, in constant co-operation that they accumulated a sub- 
stantial competence. Having no children of their own Mr. and Mrs. 
Sieben extended the comforts of their home to several children, to whom 
they stood in the place of father and mother, and their charity is not 
measured entirely by their kindness to those under their own roof, 
since they were people who constantly exhibited the spirit of community 
helpfulness and accepted almost countless opportunities to do good to 
humanity. 

The late Michael Sieben was born near the River Rhine, in the vicin- 
ity of Berlin, Germany, in 1840, being fifty-seven years of age when he 
died. He was of good' old German stock, land owners and farmers, and 
the family were faithful German Catholics. Michael Sieben grew up 
in his native town of Niederolm, came to America when a young man 
in 1861, and having served a thorough apprenticeship at the carpenter's 
trade, he followed that occupation on locating in the city of Chicago. 
From his trade he some years later drifted into the business of team- 
ing, and got together a considerable equipment and employed several 
men in the business, at which he prospered. He was living in Chicago 
at the time of the great fire of 1871. 

He had by that time established himself securely in a business way, 
and then sent back to Germany for a girl whom he had chosen to bestow 
his affections upon, and Gertrude Solms soon afterwards came to Amer- 
ica, and they were happily married. She was born in the same locality 
of Germany as her husband, they grew up and went to school together, 
plighted their troth while young, and continued faithful to each other 
during their long separation, one on one side of the Atlantic and the 
other on the other side. She was born November 8, 1843. Mrs. Sie- 
ben is a sister of Peter Solms, an account of whose career and family 
will be found elsewhere in this publication. She was one of her father's 
twenty-one children by two wives, and was next to the youngest of the 
seven children born to the second wife. When she was two years old 
her mother died, and she had to bear her share of the burdens of earn- 
ing her living from an early age. She, as well as her husband, was 
reared in the faith of the Catholic religion. 

In 1873, Mr. and Mrs. Sieben came to Upland, in Grant county, where 
he at once took a leading part in business aflEairs. He owned the grain 
elevators at Upland, also operated a saw mill, and a stave factory, and 
his business prospered and it was while there that he laid the founda- 
tion for the handsome estate which is now owned by his widow. Among 
business men, Michael Seiben's word was as good as a bond, and no man 
in Grant county enjoyed a better reputation for probit3' and substan- 
tial ability. Some years later he invested a portion of his money in one 
hundred and eighty acres of land in Monroe township. Later he bought 
thirty acres, and another tract of fifty-two acres in Jefferson township. 
Each place he improved and made into attractive and valuable farms. 
His Monroe township farm was and is one of the best homesteads in that 
locality, and it was there he lived until his death in 1897. There are sev- 
eral men now well on the way to fortune, who were the beneficiaries of 
Michael Sieben 's assistance and practical training and counsel during 
their younger days. He never refused charity, and in every relation 
was noted for his generosity, as for his excellent business judgment and 
energy-. He was in polities a Republican. 

jMrs. Sieben, as already stated, has been a worthy helper to her hus- 
band, in every issue of life, and continues the same fine ideals of service 
which they manifested when Mr. Sieben was alive. In 1900 she moved 



672 BLACKFOED AND GRANT COUNTIES 

to Gas City, and bought a fine nine-room modern home, situated on half 
a block of land, comprising six lots, and she also owns a good residence 
on a lot adjoining her home place, using this for rent. Seventy years 
of age she is still active, and one of the most lovable vs-omen of Gas City. 

John E. Ward. When business enterprise decided to convert the 
old country village of Harrisburg into a thriving industrial metropolis 
and thus gave inception to the present Gas City, many new lines of 
business were thus attracted to the locality. One of the first of this new 
set of business men to locate there was John E. Ward, who for more 
than twenty years has been successfully identified Mith Gas City as a 
merchant and as a funeral director. Mr. Ward located in Gas City in 
January, 1893. For seventeen years he did business at one location, 
and then moved to his present store on Main Street, where he carries 
a complete stock of furniture, funeral supplies, and has all the facili- 
ties for high grade service, including two funeral cars, an ambulance 
automobile and truck. His merchandise occupies two floors in a build- 
ing, twenty-two by one hundred and twenty-five feet, and he also has 
a wareroom for his surplus stock. 

Mr. Ward has reason to be proud of his family, since his ancestry is 
of very old American stock, and includes several members in the direct 
line who gave service to their country in difi'erent wars of this nation. 
John E. Ward is a native of Jefferson county, Indiana, born near Mad- 
ison, in 1855. He was reared and educated in that locality, fii-st entered 
business in the grocery trade at Areola, Illinois, where he remained six 
years and then returned to Jefferson county, and became interested in 
his present vocation. Mr. Ward when he secured his first embalming 
license on July 1, 1901, was number seventeen in tlie list, and at the 
present time there are more than two thousand similar licenses extant 
in the state. His son Clyde, associated with him in business, was li- 
censed in 1911 and at that time was the youngest man in the state to 
get official permission to practice his profession. He was at the time of 
the license's issue, twenty-one years and one month of age. 

Grandfather Jonathan Ward was a son of Daniel and Daniel in 
turn was a son of Joseph Ward. Joseph Ward came to America with 
two brothers, Wesley and Benjamin. Their arrival in this country 
antedated the Revolutionary war. Joseph Ward settled at Morris, 
New Jersey, where he lived until death. His son Daniel, born in New 
Jersey, served as a soldier through the war of the Revolution on the 
American side, and later bore arms with the American troops in the 
war of 1812. Daniel had two brothers, Luther and Calvin, also in the 
American army. Daniel Ward's children were as follows: Calvin, 
Luther, Joseph, Amos and Jonathan. The last, grandfather of the 
Gas City business man, was born in New Jersey about 1800 and married 
Mary Hamel. From the east he moved to the state of Ohio, settling at 
Madisonville, where their son Willis was born about 1830. Some years 
later the family settled in Jeft'erson county, Indiana, bought a home 
in Madison township, and there Jonathan spent his years as a farmer 
and died when si.xty-five years old, followed. some five or six years later 
by his wife, who at her death was a little older than her husband. They 
were Baptists in religion, and Jonathan Ward was one of the early 
Republican voters. / 

Willis Ward, father of John E. Ward, was fifteen years old when 
his parents moved to Indiana, he grew up on the farm in Jefferson 
county, and married Sarah E. Moncrief. She represented one of the 
very early families established in southern Indiana, and was herself 
bom in Jefferson county in 1832. The ancestry was Scotch, and her 




HON. JAMES O. BATCHELOR 



BLACKFOKD AND GRANT COUNTIES 673 

parents, Abner and Ann (Yawter) JMoucrief settled in Jefferson county 
before the tide of white settlement had made much impression on the 
wilderness, and they had their full share of experience as pioneers. 
Abner Monerief died in that county at the age of sixty-five, while his 
wife attained the remarkable age of ninety-nine years. Willis Wai'd 
and wife after their marriage lived on a farm, and were quiet and 
industrious people, and remained citizens of Jefferson county the rest 
of their lives. He died in 1891 and she in 1869, when thirty years of 
age. For six consecutive terms Willis Ward served as county commis- 
sioner, and on account of ill health declined nomination for a seventh 
term. He was a Eepublicau, and both he and his wife worshiped in 
the Baptist faith. 

Jolin E. Ward has a brother, Charles Ward, who is a sand contractor 
of Indianapolis, and has three children named Josephine, Raymond and 
Catherine; and a sister Emma, wife of Ira Montgomery, of JIadison, 
Indiana, a feed and produce merchant, and they have two children, 
Mattie and Alvin. 

ilr. John E. Ward was first married at Areola, Illinois, to Josephine 
Walkup, a native of Kentucky. At her death she left children : Mae, 
wife of J. A. Carnige, of Chicago, Illinois, and their children are: 
Clarence, Josephine and Helen ; Charles, who died at the age of twenty 
years; and Everett, who died when three months old. The second 
wife of Mr. Ward was Miss Lamora 0. Lee, and was born in Jefferson 
county, Indiana, in 1863, and finished her education in the North Madi- 
son high schools. Mr. and Mrs. Ward have three children: Ethel died 
at the age of seven years. Clyde W., who finished his preliminary edu- 
cation in the Gas City high school and the Marion Business College, pre- 
pared for his profession in the Worsham Embalming College, and has 
since been in business with his father. He married Miss ^lae Coyne 
December 7, 1913. Newell J., who is twelve years old, is attending the 
public schools. Mr. and Mrs. Ward are members of the Christian 
church, and he affiliates with the Knights of Pythias, the Improved Order 
of Red Men and the Haymakers, the Knights of the Maccabees and has 
taken much part in fraternal affairs, having passed all the chairs in the 
various lodges, and having represented his orders in the Grand Lodges. 
While he gives close attention to business, he does not neglect his public 
responsibility, and for a time served as assessor of Mill township. In 
politics he is a Republican. 

James Otterbein Batchelor. Now a commercial salesman with 
home and business headquarters at Marion, J. 0. Batchelor has for a 
number of years been identified with educational work in Indiana, and 
is also known in the field of authorship, being an intelligent student of 
history and a writer of special ability. 

James 0. Batchelor was born in Randolph county, Indiana, Novem- 
ber 18, 1876. and belongs to a family which has been in Indiana for eighty 
years or more. His parents wei-e Joseph W. and Nancy (Davis) Batch- 
elor. Grandfather Caswell Batchelor brought his family from North 
Carolina to Randolph county, Indiana, where he located among the first 
settlers about 1830. The Batchelors are of Scotch Irish stock. The 
grandfather was a substantial farmer. 

Joseph W. Batchelor. father of James 0., was born in Nash county, 
North Carolina, was a very small child when the family came to Indiana, 
and in this state spent all his active career at Bloomingsport, in Ran- 
dolph county, where he died at the age of seventy-five in 1905. By trade 
he was a cabinet maker, and he was also a local minister in the Methodist 
church. The maiden name of his first wife was Anna Vandergrift, who 



674 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

was the mother of three children, namely : William 6., who is a rural 
mail carrier at Winchester, Indiana; Ezra V., who is a machinist at 
Indianapolis; and Josephine, now deceased. Nancy C. Davis, the second 
wife of Joseph W. Batchelor, was boru at Martinsville, in West Vir- 
ginia, and is now living at the age of sixty-three in Richmond, Indiana. 
She became the mother of seven children, all living but one, namely: 
Mrs. Emma Burton of Richmond, Indiana ; Sevilla Phillips of Fountain 
City, Indiana ; Byron, who lives on the old home place at Bloomings- 
port; John L., who owns the Consolidated Dairies at Richmond, Indiana; 
and George AV., who is a butcher and baker in Canyon City, Colorado. 

James 0. Batchelor was reared in his native village of Bloomingsport, 
attended the public schools of Randolph county, and with an ambition 
for learning and liis aim being to teach school, he continued to study 
and work until he eventually graduated from the highest in.stitution of 
learning in the state. He attended the Central Normal school at Dan- 
ville, Indiana, for three years, and in 1899 first matriculated in the 
Indiana State University, where he remained a student until 1902. He 
then left in order to take up teaching, and finally completed his studies 
there in 1908 when he was graduated with the A. B. degree. For four 
years Mr. Batchelor was a teacher of the district schools in Randolph 
county, and for five years was superintendent of schools in Farmland. 
At the same time he owned and published the Farmland Enterprise. 
During 1903-04, Mr. Batchelor was an American teacher in the Philip- 
pine Islands, and in 1906-07 he w^as principal of the Ward school in 
Fort W'ayne and was principal of the Union City high school in 1907-08. 
Mr. Batchelor came to Jlarion as assistant superintendent, a position 
which he held from 1908 to 1912. Since leaving school work he has 
been on the road as special representative of the Osborn Paper Company 
of Marion. 

While in college, on November 17, 1900, Mr. Batchelor married Alice 
Mae Engle of W^iuehester, Indiana, a daughter of Calvin Engle, who at 
the time of the marriage held the office of auditor in Randolph county. 
Mr. Batchelor 's mother was Helen Greeley, who was a cousin of Horace 
Greeley, the famous editor. Mrs. Batchelor died on May, 1901, with- 
out children. On September 9, 1906, Mr. Batchelor married Leota M. 
Schultz, daughter of William E. and Cora (Alexander) Sehultz of Har- 
risville, Indiana. They have one son, Joseph Alexander Batchelor, born 
August 2, 1909. j\Iiss Leola Schultz, younger sister of Mrs. Batchelor, 
has her home with ilr. and Mrs. Batchelor. Mr. Batchelor has been 
affiliated with the Masonic Order since he was twenty-one years of age, 
and since the same date has been a member of the Knights of Pythias. 
He and his family worship in the First ]\Iethodist church at Marion. 
In politics he is Independent. Mr. Batchelor is a member of the Amer- 
ican Historical Association, and his interests and studies in history 
have been the source of his authorsliip. He is the author of a text- 
book on the history of Europe, now in the hands of New York publishers. 

On November 5, 1913, Mr. Batchelor was elected mayor of the city 
of Marion on a law enforcement proposition. W^hen asked to represent 
the people he declined to make it a party issue, maintaining his inde- 
pendence in politics, but saying he would accept such office as a popular 
law and order candidate, receiving support from law-abiding citizens of 
all political affiliations. Mr. Batchelor became mayor with a council 
representing all parties, and in making his appointments he recognized 
all of them, and thus the city government is without definite political 
stamp, but offenders against the law have discovered that law enforce- 
ment is the progi-am of the administration. While the "fly -bob" may 
be necessary in detecting violations, detection has been part of the show 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 675 

and the law-abiding citizens of Marion are standing behind the adminis- 
tration. The election of I\Iayor Batehelor is discussed in the chapter on 
politics in the history section. 

Thomas M. Couch. The name of Couch with its attendant family 
relationship is one of the best known in Grant county, especially in Jef- 
ferson township. Thomas M. Couch, of a younger generation, has made 
a splendid reputation as a farmer and stockman, and the Walnut Level 
stock farm in section six of Jeifersou township, his home for the past 
twenty years is one of the best in its improvements and facilities, and 
value in Grant county, ilr. Couch in everything he has undertaken 
has made a success by reason of his good judgment and vigorous indus- 
try, and is a man who well deserves his influential position in the com- 
munity. 

His father, Samuel Couch, was born not farm from Cincinnati, Ohio, 
about 1825, and was a child when he lost his father. His mother then 
took him to the home of her father, whose name was Todd, and they all 
at an early day came to Indiana, and settled in Jefferson township of 
Grant county. Samuel Couch was a boy at that time, grew up on the 
farm, in pioneer environment, and was trained to practical pursuits, 
but with little advantages from schools. 

In this county Samuel Couch married Nancy Furnish, whose fam- 
ily name is one of the oldest and most distinguished in Grant county. 
She was born in Franklin county, Indiana, a daughter of Judge Ben- 
jamin Furnish, one of the early settlers in Grant county, who made 
entry to large tracts of laud, and a portion of that property is now 
owned and occupied by his grandson Thomas M. Couch. 

Judge Furnish was not only a land owner and extensive farmer, but a 
man of prominence in local and county politics, was elected to the office 
of county judge and served for a number of years in that capacity. 
His death occurred when he was fiftj'-six years of age and he is buried 
in the Harmony cemetery at Matthews, ilr. Furnish married Tamer 
Corn, who survived him and died when above ninety-three years of 
age, and they are buried side by side in the Harmony Cemetery, ilr. 
Furnish and wife were among the organizers of the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Matthews, and were leaders in church affairs, and in local soci- 
eties and benevolent activities. The Judge was a Democrat, and one of 
the best known members of that party during his lifetime. 

After their marriage Samuel Couch and wife began life on a farm 
in section six of Jefferson township, and there developed a splendid 
estate. Samuel Couch died on the old homestead, December 2, 1891, 
and his wife survived him just a decade, passing away in the old home 
December 26, 1901. She was born in Franklin count.y September 5, 
1831, came to Grant county with her parents in 1837. and was married 
to Mr. Couch January 26, 1854. She was likewise for many years an 
active member of the Baptist church. Samuel Couch and wife had five 
sons and two daughters, and all are living except Nettie V. who died 
February 13, 1888. The others are : Sallie, wife of William H. Lind- 
sey, of Fairmount; Benjamin W., who is a farmer in Washington town- 
ship of Delaware county and has several children : Thomas M. ; Joseph 
W., who is a carpenter living in ^latthews, and has a family of one 
son and a daughter: Absolom G., who owns and occupies the old home- 
stead where his parents and his grandparents lived and died and who 
has seven children of his own; Orlando H., who is a prosperous agri- 
culturist in Jefferson township and has a family of four sons and two 
daughters. 

Thomas M. Couch was born on the old homestead above described, 



676 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

on August 13, 1860. His youth was passed during the decades of the 
sixties and seventies, and his advantages were supplied by the public 
school of the country. On reaching manhood he chose farming as his 
vocation, and there has seldom been a year when he has not prospered 
and added a little bit to his store. His farm of seventy-nine acres ad- 
joins the old home place, his property is excellently improved and has 
a substantial barn, a comfortable white house of nine rooms, and good 
water and other comforts and facilities are supplied on every hand. 
Mr. Couch grows a great deal of fruit and feeds all his crops to his 
high grade live stock. He raises hogs, and is perhaps best known as a 
breeder of Belgian horses. His young stallion Mack is one of the finest 
horses in the state. 

Mr. Couch was married in Henry county to Miss Emma A. John- 
son, who was born, reared and educated, near Springport in that county, 
a daughter of Jesse F. and Zilpha (Covalt) Johnson. The Johnsons 
were among the early settlers of Henry county, and also the Covalts. 
Mrs. Johnson died on the old homestead in Henry count.y in 1905, when 
nearly seventy years of age, and her husband passed away at the home 
of his daughter, Mrs. Couch, in September, 1910, lieiug then seventy- 
nine years of age. They were active members and workers in the Prim- 
itive Baptist church, and Mr. Johnson was a Democrat. Of the two 
children born to Mr. and Mrs. Couch one died in infancy and the other 
is Ora. Ora Couch was born April 26, 1891, was educated in the high 
school, graduating with the class of 1911, and now lives at Marion. 
Mr. and Mrs. Couch are working members in the ^Matthews Harmony 
Baptist church, of which he has been church clerk since April, 1909. 
In politics he supports the Democratic candidate and believes in the 
basic principles of that party. 

BuRTNET R. Jones. Among the most respected residents of Grant 
county, Indiana, is Burtney R. Jones. He was bom in this section of 
the state and has lived here all of his life, being a member of a family 
that is well known throughout the northern part of Indiana. He has 
spent the greater part of his life as a farmer and has opened up and 
developed much valuable property in Grant county, not only farming 
lands but also city realty, and although he has now retired from busi- 
ness he is still keenly interested in the life of the community and his 
advice is frequently asked in matters of public concern. 

Burtney R. Jones is the only surviving member of the family of 
Joseph and Catharine (McCormick) Jones. His father was born on 
the 15th of April, 1816, and grew up in his native state of Ohio. When 
he was a young man he removed from Preble county, Ohio, to Grant 
county, Indiana, this being in 1833. In 1839, on the 15th of Novem- 
ber, Joseph Jones was married to Catharine McCormick. His wife was 
a daughter of Robert and Anna McCormick, who had been the first set- 
tlers in Fairmount township. Grant county, Indiana, settling here on 
August 15, 1829, and coming from Fayette county, Indiana. Joseph 
Jones died as a comparatively young man, on the 16th of September, 
1856, and his wife died on the 4th of December, 1889. They were both 
prominent members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and took an 
active part in these early pioneer days of northern Indiana. 

Five sons were born to Joseph and Catharine Jones, Burtney R. 
Jones being the third in order of birth. The eldest son, George W. 
Jones was born on the 25th of September, 1841, and served in the Fifty- 
fourth Indiana Regiment during the Civil war. He was taken prisoner 
at Vieksburg, Mississippi, in tihe spring of 1863 l)ut was paroled the 
following June. His parole was of little moment to him, however, for 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 677 

he died at Annapolis, Maryland, July 25, 1863. He married Sarah J. 
Seerist, October 17, 1861. Hiram A. Jones, the second son, was bom 
October 17, 1843. He also served in the Civil war, being a soldier in 
the Eighty-ninth Indiana Regiment from August, 1862, until August, 
1865. He had his right eye shot out in the battle of Pleasant Hill, 
Louisiana, on April 9, 1864, but continued to serve until the end of the 
war. He was married on April 21, 1867, to Anna Hardy and died on 
March 31, 1908. Robert L. Jones, the fourth son, was born September 
1, 1849. He became sheriff of Grant county in November, 1888, and 
on December 9, of the same year, after successfully capturing an escaped 
horse thief, he was shot and died from the wounds, on the 11th of 
December. He was away from home at the time and died at Jerome 
in Howard county, Indiana. He married Louisa C. Jadden, on the 
25th of September, 1870, and left two sons, Sanford C, of Marion, In- 
diana, and Robert P.', of Whitefish, Montana. Joseph A. Joues, the 
youngest son, was born on March 5, 1852. He was married to Sarah J. 
Whitson on the 7th of January, 1885, and she died February 8, 1890. 
He died on April 25, 1893, at the home of his brother, Burtney R. Jones, 
in Mariou. 

Burtney R. Jones was born on the 2nd of October, 1846, at the old 
Robert McCormiek Hotel, which stood at the crossing of the Fort Wayne, 
Muncie and Indianapolis state roads. This was the first house to be 
built in Fairmount township and was erected by his maternal grand- 
father. His mother entered eighty acres of land from the government 
on August 5, 1837, and Burtney Jones grew up on the farm. He was 
married to Eliza J. Duling, a daughter of Solomon and Jane Duling, 
on the 9th of December, 1869, and after his marriage settled on eighty 
acres of timber land in section twenty-four in Fairmount township. 
Here he built a house of hew-ed logs and there lived until the death of 
his wife on April 12, 1872. She left one child, Minnie A., who was 
born on November 7, 1871, but the baby died on August 31, 1872. Mr. 
Jones continued as a fanner and made a decided success of it. He 
lived on the farm which his mother had horaesteaded and to which he 
had added until 1881 when he came to Marion and here he has resided 
ever since. 

He married Siua M. Duling, who was also a daughter of Solomon 
and Jane Duling, on September 1, 1887, and to this union have been 
born two children, namely, Edith D. Jones, who was born on the 31st 
of July, 1890, and Burtney Ralph, whose birth took place on September 
1, 1899. Mr. and Mrs. Jones together own two hundred and sixty acres 
of valuable farming land in Grant county, located in Fairmount, Jef- 
ferson and Center townships. Mr. Jones has himself cleared and 
brought into cultivation one hundred and twenty-five acres of Grant 
county laud. They also own three valuable pieces of residence prop- 
erty in the city of Marion which they have developed and improved, 
and which is considered some of the best paying property in the city. 



Johnson. As owners of large landed estates, as substantial 
farmers who have broiight the latent resources of the soil to productive- 
ness, perhaps no one family in Grant county has operated so exten- 
sively as that of Johnson, one of the best known members of which is 
]\Ir. Jesse Johnson of Mill township. 

Mr. Johnson's early ancestors in America are thought to have been 
of Scotch origin, but they had lived in Pennsylvania since before the 
Revolution, and little is known concerning the founders of the name 
in that state. His grandfather was John Johnson, a native of Penn- 
sylvania, who died there when an old man. He was a farmer by occu- 



678 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

patiou, and among his children was John Jr. John Johnson Jr. grew 
up in Pennsylvania, was married there and with his bride set out to 
become a pioneer in Ohio. They located iu what was then Guernsey 
county, but on laud now included in Noble county. He was like many 
of the pioneers skilled iu the use of his rifle, and with that he killed 
a great many deer, and by selling the skins and the hindquarters accu- 
mulated enough money to buy his first forty acres of wild land, paying 
cash for it. In that way may he be said to have laid the fouudatiou of 
the large Johnson fortune as land holders. In Ohio he worked out his 
destiny as an early settler, and one of the shrewdest business men of 
his time. His hardship and experiences would make a fascinating story, 
if told in detail, and he was one of the strong men of his generation. 
He planned and planted one of the first orchards in Noble county, and 
that orchard was famous for miles around during his lifetime. In the 
meantime his children had been growing up about him, and as popula- 
tion was getting close in that part of Ohio he looked westward iu plan- 
ning homes for the younger members of the family. With this in 
view, in 1835, he came to Grant county, and entered half a section of 
land in Jefferson township, it being his intention that this should be a 
place for his sons to test the quality of their characters as home builders 
in much the same manner as had been done some years before in Ohio. 
He also secured some government land in Delaware county, and as the 
years followed, he gradually sent one son after the other to Indiana, 
affording each one an opportunity to prosper. In securing large tracts 
of land in Indiana he was actuated not by desire for speculation, and 
he was never a speculator in the sense in which many were in those times, 
his sole ambition being to provide an outlet for the energies of his 
growing family. After getting land iu this section of Indiana, he re- 
turned to Ohio, and he and his wife continued to live and labor in that 
state until they died in Noble county. Both were then at a good old 
age, and they lie buried side by side in Noble count}'. His wife 's maiden 
name was Mary Burns, of Scotch-Irish ancestry. Of their eleven chil- 
dren, some died young, but most of them came to Grant or Delaware 
county, Indiana. Of these James Johnson, a brother of Jesse, became 
one of the largest land holders in Grant county, owning about three 
thousand acres here. He is now deceased, and more complete infor- 
mation regarding him will be found in the sketch of his son Noah John- 
son, elsewhere in this volume. 

Mr. Jesse Johnson was bom in Noble county, Ohio, August 8, 1824. 
He grew up there, had a common school education, and when a young 
man came to Grant county, where he has applied his efforts so success- 
fully as to accumulate a splendid estate. Mr. Johnson has not confined 
his investments all in one locality, and is the owner of property in sev- 
eral states. His home farm comprises one hundred and forty acres in 
section twenty-five of Mill township. In the state of Missouri, he has 
two hundred and eighty acres, in one tract near Carrollton, and a place 
of one hundred and forty-six acres near Xorburn, both in Carroll county. 
He owns one hundred and seventy -five acres on the Mississinewa River, 
in Jefferson township, and its improvements include a splendid barn 
and a good house. Another farm on which he pays taxes, embraces three 
hundred and ninety-six acres, all well improved and valuable property, 
in Monroe township of Grant county. Near Fox station in this county 
he has three hundred and forty acres, and owns one hundred and sixty 
acres near North Judson, in Pulaski county. While he was attending 
the World's Fair in Chicago in 1893, he acquired by purchase, seventy- 
three acres in DuPage county, Illinois, and still owns that tract. Mr. 
Johnson has never invested in land haphazard, but always judiciously, 




CLARKSON AVILLC'UTS HANNAH DRUCKEINIILLER WILLCUTS 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 679 

and has selected only the most productive soil, and his chief industry 
has been the raising of the cereal crops and live stock, especially sheep. 
There are few men in the middle west who have made a more complete 
success as farmers and stockmen than Jesse Johnson and his name is 
well known among men in many localities. What he has accomplished 
represents a fine natural ability and a long continued application of 
the industry and judgment which may be said to be native in the 
family stock. 

Mr. Johnson has never married, and is spending his last .years at 
the home place above mentioned, in the household of Mr. John Ludlow 
and wife. Mr. Ludlow operates this farm, and has been in charge for 
the last four years, having come here from Madison countj', Indiana, 
where he was born and reared. He was married in Madison county to 
Miss Alta Worley, of the same eountj'. They are the parents of four 
children: Eva, Edna, Wilbur and Howard. 

Clarkson Willcuts, whose death, on the 27th of January, 1912, 
deprived his home city and county of one of their best beloved and 
noblest citizens, was a life-long resident of Grant county, Indiana. A 
man of prominence in every phase of the life of the community, his 
wisdom and the experience of years made him a leader in business, 
religious and civic affairs. He lived what might be called a quiet life, 
and it was only after his death that people realized how greatly they 
had depended on his judgment and firm strength of character. On the 
occasion of his funeral the text of the sei-mon was "Know ye not that 
there is a prince and a great man fallen this day in Israel." This 
expressed most truly the feeling of his fellow citizens. 

The son of Clark and Eunice (Hall) Willcuts, Clarkson Willcuts 
was born near the old Isaac Jay homestead, southeast of the city of 
Marion, on the 2d of August, 1840. His parents were early settlers in 
this county, and the lad grew up on his father's farm. He received his 
education in Grant county, and upon its completion he entered upon his 
life as a farmer. All of his years were spent in farming and stock rais- 
ing and in a number of business pursuits, he being at one time engaged 
in the lumber and grain business. 

Mr. Willcuts married Hannah Druckemiller on the 2d of September, 
1860. She was born in Carroll county, Ohio, October 6, 1842, a daughter 
of Jacob and Sarah (Cutshall) Druckemiller. In about 1850 or 1851 
the Druckemiller family made the journey in wagons from Carroll 
county, Ohio, to Grant county, Indiana, settling on a farm in Franklin 
township, two and a half miles west of Marion, where the head of the 
family purchased a farm. He continued to increase his acreage until 
the boundaries of his farm included about eight hundred acres, and he 
then gave a farm to each of his seven children, retaining for himself only 
the forty acres on which his death occurred on the 2d of January, 1888. 
His wife survived him until the 2d of April, 1894. Mrs. Willcuts was 
about ten years of age when she came with her parents to Grant county. 
She now resides at 1702 South Washington street, Marion, and living 
with her is her sister, Mrs. Margaret Ann Mills. Mrs. Mills was bom 
in Carroll county, Ohio. April 11, 1834, and was a young lady at the 
time of the removal of the family to Grant county. She married Jona- 
than Mills, also a native of Ohio, who came to Wayne county, Indiana, 
when a boy, and as a young man located in Grant county. After their 
marriage Mr. and Mrs. ilills resided for many years in Franklin town- 
ship. Grant county, later moving to West Marion, where Mr. Mills died 
on the 1st of September. 1899. Of the five children which were given 
to their marriage four are now living. Four children were bom to 



680 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Mr. and Mrs. Willcuts, all of whom are living in Grant county : W. E. 
Willeuts, Mrs. Flora B. Fenstemaker, Mrs. Lucy D. ilodlin and Calvin 
Willcuts. There are three grandchildren : Mrs. Feru IMorrisou. Lois 
G. Modlin and Walter "\V. ilodlin; also two foster grandchildren, the 
foster son and daughter of W. E. Willeuts, Frank Loriug, formerly an 
instructor in the University of Illinois, but now residing in Marion, and 
Miss Mabel Willcuts, also of ^Marion. 

Clarkson Willcuts was a strong and active man up to the day of his 
death, the 27th of January. 1912, when he met his end at the hand of an 
assassin, one of the most unaccountable crimes ever committed, for 
Clarkson Willcuts was a man without enemies. Perhaps the best way 
to give some idea of the worth of this man would be to quote from the 
address made on the occasion of his funeral, Januarj' 30, 1912. The 
services were held at the Friends church and conducted by the Rev. Mr. 
Hiatt and the Rev. "Sir. Sweet, both of whom were personal friends of 
]\Ir. Willcuts. 

The Rev. Mr. Hiatt said : ' ' Clarkson Willeuts was a man of sterling 
worth, both in matters pertaining to his individual pursuits aud also in 
those things which have to do with the best interests of the community 
in which he lived. He never was in haste to express a conviction upon 
questions relating to the public welfare, whether political, educational 
or religious, but when he had settled in his own mind what seemed to 
him the part of wisdom he was firm and strong in his advocacy of the 
right This rare precaution and care made him a safe counselor and 
guide to those less experienced in the affairs of life. 

"As stated by one who knew him most intimately and who had 
profited largely by his wise counsel, his advice was always based upon 
actual experience or the most careful investigation of the question 
involved. 

"The deceased was a life-long member of the Friends church, and in 
his taking away the church loses one of its safest counselors and most 
liberal and willing supporters. As he grew older he seemed to feel more 
and more the care of the church and to desire more deeply her truest 
success. 

" 'A great man is fallen this day in our midst.' 

"I want to say some things in reference to the greatness of this man, 
and as I say them you will understand me to speak not out of a sense 
of superficial sentiment, hut to speak out of a heart that feels deeply the 
facts which I shall in some measure attempt to express. I want to sug- 
gest to you at the outset as we think of him that he was a great man in 
his home. A man who is great at his own hearthstone, a man who is 
great in the midst of the family circle, a man who is great in the sacred 
precincts of the home is very likely to be great anywhere. Numbers of 
you have known the wide open hospitality and charity of that house, its 
love and comforts, and the encouragement and friendship, if needed, of 
a warm Christian heart. 

"May I not suggest to you, for I am speaking to the church member, 
the man of business interests in this city and county, may I not suggest 
to you the fact of his greatness in the world of business? In the world 
of business a man of practical experience, ripened out of years of actual 
contact with men moving in the midst of business affairs. Some of you 
have known him better than I have known him. You have lived beside 
him, and how you have leaned upon him for counsel. How you have 
gone to him for advice. And you have never been disappointed. You 
have never been disappointed because if he were not certain that he 
could advise you along a safe and sane line, he was frank enough to tell 
you so. But if he knew that thing for sure which would be to your best 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 681 

interest, no one was more ready and free to give forth that counsel which 
might help a fellow business man to a higher degree of successful busi- 
ness life than was he. I am sure that the truth of this situation was 
expressed to me b.y one of his friends and neighbors. He said he never 
went out on a mere peradventure ; if he didn't know by reason of the 
painstaking study and examination of the things which were put before 
him he would not venture into it himself or send any one out along the 
line e.xperimenting in his behalf. He was frank and honorable in all 
these things. So in the business affairs of life here was a man whose 
greatness was certainly unquestioned. A man whose business integrity 
and fairness and honor is unquestioned, and you who know him best 
and dealt with him more largely will sustain this sentiment most 
heartily. ' ' 

The speaker then goes on to mention his love for the church. He 
says, "He was not a man of many words in the public assembly or con- 
gregation, but his interest in the church was unfailing, unflagging. It 
was manifested every day and week of the year. His face was an inspira- 
tion to any preacher of religion who, looking into that open countenance, 
.would see the light of welcome to the message the minister might bring. 
The church was on his heart and mind, and just before coming here this 
word was spoken to me with respect to moving from the farm to the 
city, that he had made the expression like this: 'I have moved to the 
church.' What a mark of greatness. Out here on a splendid old farm 
with every needful comfort and every needful sustenance, he was going 
to move to the city, but not to the city only, not to the city chiefly, but 
'to the church.' " 

And so passed one of those men who have made America the great 
nation that she is, not a great statesman or public man, but a man of 
strong and noble character who molded and influenced the lives of all 
with whom he came in contact. 

Alvin J. Thom.\s. It will not be necessary in a volume pertaining 
to Grant county's representative men to expatiate in cant phraseologj' 
upon the well known reputation of Quakers for honesty, integrity and 
reliability ; we may be justified in stating, however, that the mental 
and moral constitution of the gentleman ^^■hose name heads this review 
is such as to account for his success in the world of agriculture and 
business and for his high reputation in the confidence of the people of 
his community. Mr. Thomas comes from an old family of North Car- 
olina, of Welsh descent, his grandfather, Jesse Thomas, being a native 
of the Old North state. He came very early to Wayne county, Indiana, 
and while living there, Eli Thomas, the father of Alvin J., was born 
August 31, 1825. Jesse Thomas married Mary Cox, a native of North 
Cai'olina, and they were probably married just before coming to Wayne 
county or soon afterwards, as all of their children Avere born in the 
Hoosier state. Jeremiah and Enoch were the eldest children, became 
well educated, and the former was widely kno^\^l as a penman, keeping 
the accounts for some years of the old Quaker church, to which all the 
old stock of this family belong. He died in middle life, while Enoch 
attained the age of eighty-eight years. The next child in order of birth 
was Hulda, who died in early life, although she married and left chil- 
dren as did her elder brothers. Eli. the fourth in order of birth, is still 
Jiving, and is one of the alert and intelligent old men of Marion, he now 
being eighty-eight years of age. Mary il. Thomas married, left a fam- 
ily, and died when seventy-eight or seventy-nine years of age. John 
Thomas located in Kansas late in life and died there, leaving a widow 
and family. Robert, who died in 1880, at the age of fifty years, left a 



€82 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

family, and three sons are still living. Hannah Thomas married Sam- 
uel Satterthwaite, and lives in Huntington county, being the mother 
of two sons and two daughters. Noah Thomas, the youngest of his par- 
ents' children, is a married man of Tennessee and has a family. 

Eli Thomas, father of Alvin J. Thomas, was four years of age when 
the family came to Grant county in 1829. this being before the incor- 
poration of the county and before the tinie tliat the city of ]\Iarion was 
laid out. Here Jesse Thomas entered land in what is now North Clarion, 
and all of his laud is within the limits of the city at this time. About 
two years later he sold out and moved to what is now South Marion, 
and continued to follow agi-ieultural pursuits throughout the remainder 
of his life, dying in 1861 or 1862, when past sixty years of age, while 
his wife died in 1868, she being about sixty-eight years old. They 
were birthright Quakers and were connected with the first meeting 
house of that faith here, the IMississinewa Quarterly Meeting. 

Ell Thomas was reared at Marion, received a good education, 
adopted farming as his field of endeavor, and now resides at No. 2012 
South Washington street. He married at ilarion, ]\Iiss ]\Iillie Will- 
cutts, daughter of Clarkson Willcutts, who came as an early pioneer to 
what is now ilarion, Indiana, and owned land which is now located as 
north of Fourteenth street and east of Adams street in this city. He 
lived to be past middle age, and died in the faith of the Friends church. 
Jlrs. ^lillie Thomas died in 1876, at her home in Marion, aged fifty-one 
years. She and Mr. Thomas were the parents of the following children : 
Jesse, a farmer of South Marion, who is married and has two children; 
Alvin J., of this review; Lucy, the wife of J. L. ^Massena, an assistant 
teacher in the ilarion high school, who has two children. By a former 
marriage, \yith Anna Schoolie, Eli Thomas had these children: Syl- 
vanus of Marion, who died November 25, 1913. He married, but has 
no children living. Marcus, a farmer of Franklin township, is married 
and has two children. By a third marriage, with Jlinerva Thomas, Mr. 
Thomas has had no children. 

Alvin J. Thomas was born in the city of Marion, Indiana. October 9. 
1864. He was reared in that city and secured excellent educational 
advantages, attending the public .schools and the old Mississiuewa graded 
school, and then spending two years in the agricultural department of 
Purdue University. Thus prepared, he entered upon his career as a 
tiller of the soil, and continued to work on the homestead farm until 
1892, in that year coming to :Mill township and buying 200 acres of 
land in section 25, which he operates successfully as a general farmer 
and breeder of stock. He makes a specialty of Guernsey cattle, and at 
the head of his herd has a registered individual of that breed. His home 
is located on a beautiful part of the property and is fitted with modern 
comforts and conveniences; his bam, painted red and white, is commo- 
dious and substantial, and his other buildings for the shelter of his 
grain and utensils are well built and in good repair. Altogether it is 
apparent that good management is present and that the owner is a prac- 
tical man of affairs. About 150 of the 200 acres are under cultivation, 
and yield handsome crops in response to the intelligent efforts of Mr. 
Thomas. 

At Amboy. Indiana, in 1890. ]\Ir. Thomas was married to :Miss Elva 
Moorman, who was born, reared and educated there. Her family, of 
Welsh descent, lived for many years in North Carolina, were all Friends, 
and came at an early date to Indiana, settling in Wayne county, ilrs. 
Thomas' great-grandfather was John Smith, the founder of Richmond, 
Indiana. Her parents, John and Lucia (Simons) :Moorman, were na- 
tives of Wayne county, but moved early in life to :Miami county, where 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 683 

Mr. Moorman entered land which is still the property of the family. 
He died in 1877, aged sixty-three years, while the mother, who still 
makes her home at Amboy, was ninety years of age June 21, 1913, and 
is still alert in mind and body. She was formerly a member of the 
Quaker church, but was turned out of that faith under the former 
stringent rules. Mrs. Thomas has one uncle living, Jesse Moorman, who 
is now in the Soldiers' National Home, at Marion, and ninety-five years 
of age. He served in the Union army throughout the Civil War. The 
brothers and sisters of Mrs. Thomas are: Emma and Etta, who are 
unmarried and live with their aged mother at Amboy; Ben,iamin, living 
on the old Miami county homestead, who is married and has a family; 
and Flora, deceased, who was the wife of Samuel Heston, formerly of 
Amboy and now a resident of Canada. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas have three children : Eli, born in 1892. edu- 
cated in the public schools and now residing on the home place ; Flora, 
born in 1896, a member of the graduating class of 1914, at the Gas City 
high school ; and Lillian, born in 1908, the baby. ilr. and Mrs. Thomas 
are devout members of the Quaker church. His political faith is that 
of the Republican party. 

John T. Barnett, M. D. Among the most successful physicians and 
surgeons of the medical fraternity of Grant county, is John T. Barnett, 
M. D., of Jonesboro. Although his residence in this community covers 
a period of scarcely three years, he has already won a truly enviable 
reputation for skill and general ability, and has succeeded in gaining a 
large and representative practice and a firm place in the confidence of 
the people. He stands high also in the estimation of his professional 
brethren, and his opinion has great weight in their councils. Doctor 
Barnett 's success has come as a result of his own eft'orts, for he worked 
his own way through college, and from early manhood his life has been 
one of the greatest activity. 

Doctor Barnett was bom at Hardensburg, Indiana, December 29, 
1857. He was given an ordinary education in the public schools of that 
place, following which he paid his own way through Marengo Academy 
and adopted the profession of teacher. Having decided upon a pro- 
fessional career, he devoted what time could be spared from his school- 
room duties to the study of medicine, and eventually entered the Ken- 
tucky School of Medicine, where he was graduated with his degree in 
1882. He at once entered upon the practice of his profession at Har- 
densburg, and his reputation as a skillful surgeon grew so rapidly that 
his services were in constant demand over four counties. His complete 
and self-sacrificing devotion to his work, however, endangered his health, 
and accordingly, in 1909, he came to Jonesboro to recuperate, as well 
as to give his daughter the benefit of better educational advantages. 
Always a great student, and determined not to retrograde, he has kept 
fully abreast of all modern discoveries in science pertaining to his pro- 
fession, especially along the lines of surgery, which comprises his fa- 
vorite branch of practice, and in which he has been remarkably success- 
ful. He is a member of the Mississippi Valley Medical Association, 
the Grant County Medical Society, the Indiana State Medical Society 
and the American Medical Association, and has been the representative 
and examining physician for a number of insurance companies. For a 
long period he has served in the capacity of member of the board of 
health, and in numerous ways has contributed to the welfare of his 
community. His offices are maintained in his pleasant residence at the 
end of Eleventh street, overlooking the river, and he likewise has a well- 
equipped suite in the Citizens Bank building. Doctor Barnett is a Re- 



684 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

publican in political matters and has been more or less active in local 
matters, although not to the neglect of his practice. His fraternal con- 
nections include membership in the subordinate lodges of the ^lasons 
and Odd Fellows, belonging to Solomon Lodge No. 71, A. F. & A. M.. of 
Hardeusburg, Encampment No. 206, I. 0. O. F., and Lodge No. 501, 
of the latter, and in this latter connection has passed through all the 
chairs and represented his lodge in the Grand Lodge of the state. 

Doctor Baniett was married in Ohio to Miss Lida Osborn, who was 
born in Clinton county, Ohio, in 1856, and was for ten years a school- 
teacher before her marriage. Two daughters have been boi-n to this 
union: Ethel M., a graduate of Hardeusburg High school and Marion 
College, where she took a classical and scientific course and graduated 
in 1912, and now a teacher in the public schools of Grant county; and 
Margaret, who received the same advantages and graduated from Ma- 
rion College in the class of 1914. Doctor Baruett is a IMethodist, while 
his wife is a member of the Society of Friends. 

Henry Keller "Willman. For many years Henry Keller Will- 
man, of Jonesboro, has been numbered among Grant county's progres- 
sive business men. The success which he has achieved in life is the re- 
sult of well applied energy, industry and strict attention to business 
in all its details. He owes his high standing in the commercial and 
social world to himself alone, for he started out to make his own liveli- 
hood when but a lad, and, undaunted by the many obstacles which he 
encountered, steadily pressed forward to the goal which he had set be- 
fore him. 

Mr. Willman comes of good old German stock, his grandfather, Wil- 
liam Willman, and his father, Louis Willman. being natives of Long- 
stad, Hesse-Darmstadt, where the former was born about 1780 and the 
mother in 1805. William Willman was married in Germany, and his 
wife died there, leaving two sons : Peter, born in 1803, who passed his 
life in farming in the Fatherland and there reared a large family; and 
Louis. Louis Willman grew up to sturdy manhood, and as a large and 
well-built man was called upon for military sei-vice. He retained too 
keen a remembrance of the appearance of Napoleon's army on its re- 
turn from the disastrous Russian invasion in 1815. however, to desire 
the life of a soldier, and managed to secure a substitute, subsequently 
returning to his home to resume the trade of wagon-maker, which he 
had learned as an apprentice. He was there married to ]Miss Christina 
Keller, and in Germany they became the parents of two children : Eliza- 
beth and Peter. In 1830, deciding to try his fortunes in the United 
States, Mr. Willman, with his father, his wife and his two children, 
embarked at Hamburg on a sailing vessel bound for this country. A 
voyage of six months followed, during which the ship encountered ter- 
rific storms, and at one time was reported lost, but after the passengers 
and crew had nearlv died of starvation the vessel finally made port at 
Baltimore, Maryland. Shortly thereafter the little party of emigrants 
went to Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, where Louis Willman secured 
employment on a railroad, but his refusal to vote the Whig ticket caused 
him to become unpopular among his fellow-employes and he accord- 
ingly removed with his family to Germantown, Wayne county, Indiana, 
where for a few years he worked at his trade. In 1840 he came to 
Blackford eounty,"and located in Washington township, near the center 
of the county, where he secured a small farm, on which the grandfather, 
William Willman, passed away about 1842 when about seventy years 
of age. He died in the faith "of the Evangelical Lutheran church, of 
which all the familv were members. About 1846, Louis Willman moved 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 685 

with his family to Hartford City, Indiana, where he resumed the wagou- 
making business, for a time, and then again took up farming on a prop- 
erty east of that city. This continued to be his home during the re- 
mainder of his life, his death occurring thereon in January, 1875. 
Mrs. Willman had died in Hartford City in 18-49, when about forty 
years of age. The children were brought up in the faith of the Evan- 
gelical Lutheran church and were confirmed therein. Louis Willman 
was a Democrat in his political views, although he never entered actively 
into public affairs save as a good citizen with the interest of his com- 
munitj- at heart. The children born in America to Louis and Christina 
(Keller) Willman were as follows: Christina, wife of James E. Ervin, 
who left a family at her death ; Catherine, also deceased ; Anna, who is 
the wife of George Gable and resides at Hartford City ; Louis, who at his 
death left three sons and one daughter; Henry Keller, of this review: 
Margaret, who was married and the mother of one son and three daugh- 
ters at the time of her death ; and Mary Ann, deceased) who was married 
and had two daughters. By a second marriage Louis Willman had one 
son, Albert, who died at the age of six months. 

Henry Keller Willman was born in Blackford county, Indiana, Oc- 
tober 7, 1841. He received only an ordinary education in the public 
schools, but since his j^outh has done much reading, and through study 
and observation has become a very well-informed man on numerous sub- 
jects. Although not a strong lad, he received a good start in life, and 
as a youth learned the trade of custom shoemaker, serving an appren- 
ticeship of three years, during the first year receiving a salary of twen- 
ty-five dollars, in the second year forty dollars and in the third year 
seventy-five dollars. During the next quarter of a century he was ac- 
tively identified ^ath the shoe business, both as a manufacturer and a 
dealer. He came to Jonesboro in ilarch, 1868, and a few years later 
formed a partnership with Calvin Evans, but soon disposed of his in- 
terest to Mr. Evans and embarked in a separate enterprise of his own, 
successfully conducting his business until 1891. In that year he sold 
out to a Mr. Ruley, and in 1892 accepted the appointment to the post- 
mastership of Jonesboro, during President Cleveland's administration. 
He was the first third-class postmaster of the place, on a salary, and 
continued to efficiently perform the duties of his office for four years 
and six months. When his term of office expired he resumed operations 
in the shoe business, and continued therein until 1908, since which time 
he has been living a quiet, retired life in his handsome residence at 
Sixth and Main streets, a modern eight-room home which he erected in 
1908. Mr. Willman is a Democrat in politics, but has been honored by 
the Republican party by election to the city council, on which he served 
eight years. For a long period he has been prominent in promoting the 
educational interests of Jonesboro as a member of the school board. He 
was four .years Chairman of the Council. 

Mr. Willman was married in Jonesboro to Miss Hannah Margaret 
Ruley, who was born in Grant county, Indiana, in 1840, was here reared, 
and was educated in the public schools of Marion. Her fathei-. Burton 
W. Ruley, was an early settler and prominent farmer of this county, 
and seiwed as county assessor for several terms and as county treasurer 
for nine years. He died in 1874, at the age of sixty-eight years. Mr. 
Ruley was a native of Virginia, and was married in Miami county, In- 
diana, to Miss Mahala Jones, who was born in Kentucky, and who died 
at the age of eighty-six years in Grant county. They came to this county 
as pioneers and settled on wild land in ilill township, where their four 
children were born, namel.v : Joseph J. ; ^Mrs. Hannah Margaret Willman : 
Maria E. ; and Mary S., who is now the widow of Nathan Weddington and 



686 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

lives in Indianapolis with her children. The oldest child, Sarah Jane, 
deceased, was boru in Miami couuty. 

Mr. Willman is a member of the Presb.yteriau church, while his wife 
belongs to the Methodist Episcopal faith, and both have been active in 
church work. Thej" have numerous friends in Jonesboro, who esteem 
them for their sterling qualities of mind and heart and for the honor- 
able and upright lives which they have led. Mr. Willman is a valued 
and popular member of the i\Iasonic Blue Lodge, No. 109, of Jonesboro, 
of which he is treasurer ; and of Subordinate Lodge, No. 82, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of this place, whicli has been in existence for sixty- 
four years and of which he is secretary. 

William Edgar Willcuts. For many years the name of Willeuts 
has been associated with the history of Grant county, and the head of 
the house to-day, William Edgar Willcuts, is ably upholding the repu- 
tation built by his father and grandfather for honesty, integrity and true 
worth. William E. WiUcuts has been engaged in farming for many 
years, and he is also a well known contractor of Marion, having done 
some of the best work in that line which has ever been performed in 
Grant county. 

William Edgar Willcuts was born in Franklin township, Grant 
county, Indiana, on the 4th of January, 1862. He is a son of the late 
Clarkson Willcuts and Hannah (Druckemiller) Willcuts. Clarkson 
Willcuts was born on the 2d of August, 1840, in Grant county, Indiana, 
the son of Clark and Eunice (Hall) Willcuts. Clark Willcuts was a 
native of the state of North Carolina, and he was one of the first settlers 
of Grant county when he migrated to this state in 1834. He settled one 
mile south of Marion, where he lived until 1843, when he removed to 
Franklin township. He was born in 1792, and died November 27, 1862. 
He was the first man to build a fence in Grant county, and at one time 
he built five miles of fence. He owned at one time nearly all of the 
land from Tenth street in Marion to the top of the hill, and most of the 
abstracts iii the county records show his name. He was a strong char- 
acter, a staunch anti-slavery man and aided in the operation of the 
underground railroad. The Willcuts family were all Quakers, and Clark 
Willcuts was a charter member of the first Quaker meeting which was 
held in Grant county. He was three times married, and Clarkson Will- 
cuts and a sister were the only children by his marriage to Eunice Hall. 

Clarkson Willcuts. who is given more extended mention elsewhere in 
this volume, was a farmer and a stockraiser, as well as being interested 
in the grain and lumber business. He spent his entire life in Grant 
county, and was one of the most beloved men this entire section. His 
sudden death on January 27, 1912, was a great loss to the community, 
deeply felt by everyone. His wife, who was born in Carroll county, 
Ohio, October S* 1862, is still living. Clarkson Willcuts took an active 
part in the affairs of the church and in the civic life of the community. 
He was twice elected and once appointed a trustee of Franklin township. 
Four children were born to Clarkson and Hannah Willeuts, all of whom 
reside in Grant county. 

William E. Willeuts was born on his father's farm, and he received 
his early education in the grammar and high schools of Grant county. 
He was" one of the first two students who" received diplomas from the 
Grant county schools. After leaving high school he attended Earlham 
College at Richmond, Indiana, and then became a student at Purdue 
University ■ at Lafayette, Indiana. After leaving the university he 
became engaged in farming, and has been interested in that vocation 
more or less since that time. For the past twenty-five years, however, 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 687 

he lias been actively interested in the contracting business, and has done 
much work in the line of bridge and sewer construction and in concrete 
work. He has built manj' bridges in Grant and adjoining counties, and 
he and the various men with whom he has been associated from time to 
time have tilled a number of contracts in Georgia, Ohio, Michigan and 
Indiana. He has built up a reputation for thorough and careful work- 
work that will last — and his services are in gi-eat demand. He was also 
engaged in the coal business for a time. He owns one farm in Franklin 
township, consisting of about two hundred acres, and has a half section 
of land in Van Buren township, he overseeing their management. 

Mr. Willcuts was married on the 24th of September, 1885, to Margaret 
M. Johnson of Sims towTiship. She died on the 18th of March, 1911, 
after nearly twenty-six years of an ideally happy married life. Mr. and 
Mrs. Willcuts were inseparable, traveling together a good deal. They 
had visited practically every part of the western hemisphere, and had 
also traveled abroad. They had no children, but adopted and reared 
with loving care a boj' and a girl, who have been an honor to them. 

Frank Carlton Loring was a babe of four years when he came to the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Willcuts, and he is now a brilliant and successful 
electrical engineer. He attended the grammar schools of Grant county, 
and was later graduated from the Marion high school. He then entered 
Purdue University, from which he was graduated in 1904, having taken 
the course in electrical engineering. He next spent eighteen months in 
the east, from June, 1904. until September, 1906, in telephone work in 
Rochester and New York CitJ^ New York. In the fall of 1906 he 
entered Columbia University in New York, and during that year 
completed the work of his Master's degree. He then accepted a position 
as instructor in Coimell University, spending one year there. In 1909 
he entered the employ of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company of 
New York City, remaining with them until Januarj^, 1912. After nine 
months spent at home resting he went back to University work once 
more, and has been an instructor in electrical engineering at the Univer- 
sity of Illinois since September, 1912. 

The daughter of the family, Miss Mabel Willcuts, was taken from 
the orphans ' home at the age of six years. She received her early educa- 
tion in the grammar and high schools of Grant county, being a graduate 
of the Marion high school. She then entered the Mechanics Institute in 
Rochester, New York, from which she was graduated from the domestic 
science course in 1910. She has spent two years of the time since leaving 
school as a demonstrator in the New England states. In that capacity 
she is in great demand by large corporations engaged in the manufacture 
of domestic utilities, especially gas. 

On the 12th of June, 1913, William E. Willcuts was married to Mrs. 
Luella Hier IMosure. Mrs. Willcuts has a daughter, Lola Mosure, by her 
former marriage. Mr. Willcuts' household consists of himself and wife, 
his two foster children, Frank G. Loring and Miss Mabel Willcuts, and 
his stepdaughter. Miss Lola Mosure. 

Bennett B. Coleman. In early life accustomed to the hard work 
which sharpens the mind and develops the body, Bennett B. Coleman 
grew up in an agricultural neighborhood, and when he came to the time 
to make a decision regarding his life work, finally selected that of till- 
ing the soil. In the years that followed he had no reason to regret of 
his choice, for he arose to a substantial position among the farmers of 
Grant county, and now, in the evening of life, is able to enjoy the com- 
forts of a handsome home and congenial surroundings, content in the- 
knowledge of a well-spent and useful life. 



688 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Bennett B. Coleman was born in Wayne county, North Carolina, 
December 11, 1827, and is a son of Elias and Sallie (Peelle) Coleman, 
natives of that state, who came as pioneers to Indiana. The grandpar- 
ents on both sides were born in the Old North state, were of English 
descent and Quakers, a faith to which the family has always belonged. 
Elias Coleman was born November 25, 1798, and was a youth of 
eighteen years when with another young man he came on a single horse, 
the lads taking turns in riding and walking, and thus covering the dis- 
tance from North Carolina to the Arle.y Quaker settlement, the newly 
opened region of the wilds of Randolph county. There he remained 
for some time, looking over the land and preparing for his future, and 
when he had his arrangements complete returned to North Carolina 
and M-as married under the rules and discipline of the Quaker church 
to Sallie, the daughter of Willis and Betsey Peelle, who had been born 
in 1791. They were married in the Contentuea meeting house and con- 
tinued to reside in North Carolina until after the birth of four chil- 
dren: Edith, who died in North Carolina; Harriet, Nathan and Ben- 
nett B. In the summer of 1828 the little family started out for In- 
diana, Mr. Coleman hiring a man with a horse and wagon to take the 
family effects over the mountains northwest to Randolph county, to be 
paid for by the pound which the expressage weighed. There were 
three other men in the party beside the senior Mr. Coleman, and in ad- 
dition Mrs. Coleman carried her seven-months old baby, Bennett B., 
in her arms and over aU the mountains save one. This journey con- 
sumed some weeks, and when the little party arrived, j\Ir. Coleman 
found that when he had paid for the trip at the rate of one dollar per 
pound, he would have about ten dollars left with which to make a start 
in the new community. He was a blacksmith by trade, but at once com- 
menced to engage in agricultural pursuits and his energy, thrift and 
indomitable perseverance enabled him to succeed in his undertakings. 
He resided in Randolph county, Indiana, until 1833, at which time he 
moved to Newport, now Fountain City, in Wayne county, Indiana, and, 
in partnership with -Joel Parker was engaged in the manufacture of 
wagons for a time. Later he became interested in merchandising in 
Wayne county, and in 1848 came to Grant county, located at Jones- 
boro, and became a merchant. This place was then but a small ham- 
let, boasting of a tannery, a carding mill, a sawmill and a flouring mill, 
with a scattering of small houses. Mr. Coleman, with excellent ability, 
soon built up a handsome trade, assisted by his stalwart son, Bennett 
B., then a man of twenty-one years. Here Elias Coleman was known 
as one of the town's substantial men for many years. His first wife 
died in the old cabin home now located next to the home of Bennett B. 
Coleman, in 1864, at the age of seventy years, and Mr. Coleman then 
married Mrs. Susan (Ellis) Cofifin, who survived for some years. Both 
passed away in Marion, Mr. Coleman in October, 1890, and she several 
years later, when seventy years of age. They were all members of the 
Friends Society, but, although bitterly opposed to war, were strong 
anti-Slavery people and expressed their opinion on the subject when- 
ever opportunity offered. After coming to Indiana there were two chil- 
dren born to EJias Coleman and his first wife: Jesse, who died young; 
and Mary, who married Enoch P. Small, and died advanced in years 
in Wabash county, this state. 

Of the childi-en born to Elias Coleman, Bennett B. is the only sur- 
vivor. He grew up largely in Wayne county, where he was given the 
educational advantages to be secured in the primitive schools, and was 
about twenty-one years of age when he came to Jonesboro. For some 
time he was associated with his father in conducting the general store, 
but subsequently adopted agricultural work in Franklin township, a 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 689 

section which at that time was still practically in its virgin state. There 
both he and his father killed numerous deer, especially on what was 
known as Deer Creek. Mr. Coleman inherited much of his father's 
industi-y and energetic nature, and set about to make a home for him- 
self in the wilderness. His good management and persistent labor 
brought its reward, and when he disposed of his land in 1861 he was 
able to realize a handsome profit. In the fall of that year he returned 
to Jonesboro, and here purchased sixtj' acres of land, the greater part 
of which is now included within the corporation limits of the city, and 
to this he added from time to time until he had over 100 acres. When 
the Indiana Rubber and Insulated Wire Company decided to place its 
plant here, Mr. Coleman's land was found to be included in the prop- 
erty selected, and he accordingly disposed of ninety-five acres, in 1893, 
although he still retains several choice lots and has a handsome home. 
Mr. Coleman is now passing his declining years in peaceful rest. In 
spite of the fact that he has passed his eighty-sixth birthday, he is still 
active in body and alert in mind, in full possession of his faculties and 
able to read without glasses. Although retired from active pursuits, 
he takes a keen interest in the events that go to make history, and to 
matters that directly affect the welfare of his community or its people. 
Mr. Coleman has had the privilege of seeing great changes take place 
and a great development effected in Grant county, and has played no 
small part in this growth and advancement himself. He has been a 
life-long Republican, casting his first vote for Hale and his next two 
votes for Lincoln. He was formerly a Quaker, a member of the Anti- 
Slaverj' branch of that denomination, but for many years he has been 
a Presbj'terian. 

Mr. Coleman was married first to Sarah Shugart, who was born 
in Wa.yne county, Indiana, in 1829, married in 1849, and died Septem- 
ber 4, 1861, in the faith of the Friends church. She was the mother of 
four children: Emma C, who married E. M. Whitson, M. D., who died 
at Jonesboro, November 7, 1905, was a soldier for three years in the 
Civil War as a priva1:e of the 101st Regiment, Indiana Volunteer In- 
fantry, later studied and practiced medicine until his death, had two 
children bj- his first marriage, one of whom is a prominent educator, 
and is survived by his second wife, who is a resident of Jonesboro; 
William H., a sketch of whose career will be found on another page of 
this work; Isadora, who died at the age of six years; and Lillian, who 
died single as a young lady of twent.y-two years. Mr. Coleman's sec- 
ond marriage was to Jliss Anna Wilson of Ohio, who met an accidental 
death in 1880 when attacked by a maddened bull. She left one daugh- 
ter, Ida, the wife of William Weddington, now living in New Mexico, 
and the mother of seven children, of whom six are living. Mr. Cole- 
man was married (third) at Crayton, Indiana, in August, 1883, to Mrs. 
Anna Martin, nee Hartsock, who was born in Indiana, February 16, 
1843. She had two children by her former marriage to James Martin, 
deceased, Josephine and Lew Wallace, both of whom died young. Mr. 
Coleman is now a member of the Presbyterian church and Mrs. Cole- 
man is a member of the Universalist church at Anderson, Indiana. 

William H. Coleman. The only male representative of the family 
of Bennett B. and Sarah (Shugart) Coleman, William H. Coleman has 
for sixty years lived in Grant county, and during the greater part of 
his life has been a prosperous farmer of Mill township. 

William H. Coleman was born on the old Deer Creek farm in MiU 
township. Grant county, on iMay 4, 1854, and has never permanently 
resided outside of his native community. Reared in the country, and 



690 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

in the wholesome moral atmosphere of old Jlill, he has been engaged in 
farming since he reached the years of maturity, and has applied to 
his work the same principles and industry which would have enabled 
him to succeed had he chosen a business in the city or a profession. In 
1877 he acquired his present home on Section 32 of J\lill township, and 
has lived there and developed a good estate through a period of more than 
thirty-five years. His is one of the excellent farms of that township, 
and from the products of his labors he has kept himself and family in 
comfort and enjoyed a fair degree of success. 

In Mill township on November 29, 1877, ]\Ir. Coleman married Miss 
Rachel Comptou, who was born in WaiTen county, Ohio, on November 
11, 1852, and was reared and educated in her native county. Her 
parents were Stephen and Susan L. (Carter) Compton. Her mother 
was born at IMill Grove. Warren county, Ohio, in 1817, and her father 
in Culpeper county, Virginia, on August 22, 1801. They were married 
in 1844 in Warren county, Ohio, and sj^ent the rest of their lives in 
that vicinity, where Stephen Compton, who was a shoemaker by trade, 
died in 1880, and she passed away on April 2, 1868. The Comptons 
were members of the ]\Iethodist Episcopal church, and Stephen Comp- 
ton voted the Democratic ticket. 

Mr. and ^Irs. Coleman have the following children: Sarah M., a 
graduate from the Jouesboro high school with the class of 1899. lives 
at home and has been a constant helper and companion to her parents; 
Bennett B., the second child, while living at home is employed in a 
factory in Marion; Lawrence E. is also at home and unmarried; Lillian 
Bell is the wife of Professor G. A. Roush, who is an instructor in the 
Lehigh University of South Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, where they 
reside, and is also assistant secretary of the Electro Chemical Society; 
Howard is a gi-aduate of the Jonesboro high school and still remains 
at home. Mr. and Mrs. Coleman are members of the Presbyterian 
church of Jonesboro, and their sons and daughters worship in the same 
faith. Mr. Coleman and his sons are stanch Republicans, and all are 
active members of the Knights of Pythias order, all three sons being 
past Chancellors in the Jonesboro Lodge. Father and sons add a 
quartet of excellent citizens to Mill township, and are among the most 
highly esteemed men of the community. 

Harry T. Connelly. Cashier of the Upland State Bank, Mr. Con- 
nelly is one of the most successful farmers and stockmen of the eouuty, 
and" since 1909 has divided his time and attention between the business 
of agriculture and banking. The Upland State Bank was incorporated 
November 22, 1909, with a capital stock of twenty-five thousand dollars 
and at the present time its surplus is four thousand dollars. The total 
resources amount to one hundred and forty thousand dollars, and the 
deposits of one hundred and fifteen thousand dollars indicate better 
than any other item the complete confidence placed by the community 
in this institution. Since it opened its doors for business, the bank has 
made a most remarkable growth, and its position is due both to its suc- 
cessful management and to the fact that all its officials and directors 
are well known residents of Grant county. The officers are: John 
Smith, president; Herman Fisherbuck, vice president: Harry T. Con- 
nellv, cashier ; R. 0. Smith, assistant cashier ; and the directors are 
John Smith, H. Fisherbuck, R. J. Spencer, Edward Block, N. E. Duck- 
wall, Daniel ^Marine. A. L. Horner, Charles W. Reed, and A. N. Kizer. 
All except Mr. Kizer were on the original board, and he has been con- 
nected with the institution since its second year. The Upland State 
Bank has correspondents in Chicago and Pittsburgh, and carries an 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 691 

account with the Grant Trust aud Savings Bank at Marion. The bank 
has membership in the State Bank Association. 

Harrj' T. Connelly was born on a farm near Upland on February 
10, 1874, a son of John W. and Rebecca J. (Clevenger) Connelly. He 
comes of old Scotch-Irish ancestry. His grandfather, Rev. John Con- 
nelly, who was born in Virginia, was a prominent Methodist minister 
of his time. In 1808 he was made presiding elder over a district com- 
prising portions of Virginia, Maryland and western Pennsylvania, 
and his last appointment to that office was made in 1821. He died in 
"Wayne county, Indina, when past eighty years of age in 1846. Rev. 
Connelly married Elizabeth Fell, a Virginia girl, and of an old family 
in that commonwealth. Her ancestors came from England to Balti- 
more during the seventeenth century, and played active parts in their 
respective communities, both in that state and in Virginia. Elizabeth 
(Fell) Connelly, died in Wajaie county, Indiana, about 1830, being 
under forty years of age at the time. She became the mother of three 
children, namely : Joseph, who was one of the pioneer settlers of Kan- 
sas, a farmer there, and died leaving a family of six children; one 
daughter died early in life, and John W. Connelly. 

John W. Connelly, father of the Upland banker, was born in Wil- 
liamsburg, Virginia, May 11, 1825, and was a very small child when 
his parents moved out to Wayne county, Indiana, where they were 
among the pioneers and took an active part in the establishment of 
Methodism in that section. 

Reared and educated in Wayne county, John W. Connelly gave 
perhaps the greater part of his productive years to the cause of educa- 
tion. He taught school in Wayne county, and in 1856 came to Grant 
county, where he bought land in Jefferson township, now a part of the 
Millerton Farm. He combined the occupations of teaching and farm- 
ing, and his record as a teacher aggregated about thirty years. In 1871 
he bought one hundred and ten acres in Monroe township, later increased 
his holdings, and lived there in prosperous circumstances until his death 
on October 27, 1893. In politics he was a Republican after the war. 
His first vote was cast for Franklin Pierce, and after voting for 
Douglas in 1860 he transferred his allegiance to the Republican candi- 
dates, and voted in 1892 for Harrison. John W. Connelly was married 
in Wayne county to iliss Rebecca Clevenger, who was born in that 
county, September 6, 1834, and who died in JMonroe township of Grant 
county, December 28, 1909. Early in her life she joined the Methodist 
church and she and her husband had membership in the Doddridge 
church in Wayne county, one of the oldest societies of that denomina- 
tion in Indiana. Later they were among the leading members of the 
Upland church in this county. Rebecca Clevenger was a daughter of 
Samuel and Ruth (Spahr) Clevenger, who were both natives of Vir- 
ginia, but were married in Wayne county, Indiana. Samuel Clevenger 
was born in 1808, and his wife in 1812. He died in 1881 and she in 
1884. They were pioneers, upright and worthy people, both as neigh- 
bors and citizens, and active members of the Doddridge chui-ch in 
Wayne county. Mrs. John W. Connelly was the oldest in a family of 
eight children, aud all of them lived in Indiana. Her sister Sabra died 
at the age of seventy-six. John W. Connelly and wife had eight chil- 
dren, named as follows: John, who lives at home and is unmarried; 
Belle, who died after her marriage to Noah Johnson, leaving three 
children, Alva, Elva, and Bertha; Samuel, now postmaster of Upland; 
Mary, who died in infancy; Joseph, who is an oil man in Oklahoma, 
and is married but has no children; Dora, wife of J. P. Richard, a 



692 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

resident of Tulsa, Oklahoma, and their children are Hugo and Homer; 
Flora, who died at the age of twenty-two years, and Harry T., the 
youngest. 

Harry T. Connelly was educated in the schools and at the Fair- 
mount Academy, and in the Marion Normal College. From 1893 until 
1302 he was one of the successful teachers, most of his work being done 
in Jefferson and Monroe township. While a man of extended activities 
in business, Mr. Connelly's life is also distinguished for much public 
service, and his record as a teacher might be well included under that 
head. From 1905 until January 1, 1909, he gave four years of capable 
administration in the office of township trustee of Jlonroe township. 
He was elected on the Republican ticket, and was the second Repub- 
lican ever elected to that office in the township. His majority of sixty- 
four votes was a noteworthy showing in a Democratic community. In 
the fall of 1908 Mr. Connelly was elected to the state legislature and 
served during the sessions of 1909-10 and in 1911. During the first 
session he was on the committee of education and roads, and in 1911 
was on the committee of counties and to'miships and also on the com- 
mittee of banks and trusts companies. 

In 1899 Mr. Connelly came into the possession of the old home 
place by buying out the other heirs, and soon after settled down to 
farm life. The farm, located in section thirty-four of Monroe town- 
ship, comprises one hundred and eighty acres of land, all under the 
plow, wath the exception of a timber lot of thirty-five acres. In 1912, 
his crops were represented by the following figures : Eight hundred 
bushels of corn, nine hundred bushels of oats, and one hundred and 
sixty bushels of rye. He sold about one hundred head of hogs during 
that year, and he averages from one hundred to one hundred and 
twenty-five hogs a year. He has a herd of twenty-three short horn 
cattle on the place, twenty-five sheep and four horses. These figures, 
without further comment, are sufficient to show that Mr. Connelly is 
in the farming business for something besides recreation, and he is 
rightly entitled to his reputation as one of the most progressive and 
successful farming men in the county. 

On June 23, 1904, at Upland, was solemnized the marriage of 
Harrv T. Connelly, with Miss Edith Kline. Mrs. Connelly was bom 
in Mill Grove, Blackford county, Indiana, August 5, 1874, and is a 
woman of splendid education and thorough culture. Her schooling 
was in Hartford City, and in the well known private school kept by 
Mrs. Bleaker. For eleven years ]\Irs. Connelly was a successful teacher 
in Hartford City, and in Upland. Her father is Henry J. Kline, who 
for the past twenty years has had his home in Upland, and in early 
years made a record as one of the popular teachers in this part of the 
state. 

Mr. and Mrs. Connelly have five children : D. Gretchen, who is now 
in school at Upland; Barbara H., also in school; Marjorie E., Phillip, 
and Roger Thomas. Mr. and Mrs. Connelly are members of the Upland 
Methodist church, and he has fraternal associations with the Masonic 
Order at Upland, and the Royal Chapter at Hartford City. 

Edgar Thornburg. One of the prospering farmers of Grant county, 
Edgar Thornburg is one whose success has been won entirely as the 
result of his own well directed efforts. He had no fortune given to 
him by families, and early in life had the courage to marry and estab- 
lish a" home for himself," and since that time has steadily prospered, 
until he is reckoned as one of the substantial nuni of Monroe township. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 693 

In that township he purchased a home place of seventy-four acres of 
land, and in 1912, as au indication of his progressive farming efforts, 
he harvested one thousand bushels of corn, seven hundred bushels of 
oats, cut seven tons of hay and shipped to market about fifty hogs. 
His fai-m is not only a profitable business, but is an attractive home 
place, where he and his family enjoy life. His large brick house is 
located on a hill, with land sloping down from it, and among other im- 
provements are some good barns, while all the farm is kept in good 
condition. Edgar Thornburg was bom May 9, 1863, in Henry county, 
Indiana, a son of Alfred M. and Emeline (Wallace J Thornburg. His 
father was born in North Carolina, and the mother in Payette county, 
Indiana. Her parents were natives of New Hampshire, and she died 
in 1872 in ilarion. Grandfather Benjamin Thornburg emigrated from 
North Carolina to Henry county, among the pioneei-s. Alfred M. 
Thornburg, the father, was a carpenter by trade, and moved to Marion 
in 1871. He lived there until February, 1886, when he went west to 
Los Angeles, California. The five children were Edgar; George of 
Los Angeles; Elmer of Marion; Mrs. Aletha L. Beck, who died in De- 
cember, 1911 ; and Mrs. Ida Belle Fruchey of Marion. 

After the death of the mother, several of the children were placed 
in the homes of friends to be cared for and reared. In this way Edgar 
Thornburg entered the home of Samuel R. Thompson of Monroe town- 
ship, where he was reared to manhood. When he was twenty-two years 
old he married and moved to the Holloway farm, where he spent fifteen 
years. Shortly after moving to the Holloway place in 1886 he bought 
sixty acres of land, and after selling that in 1901 bought his present 
homestead. 

ilr. Thornburg was married in 1886 to Slartha A. Hodson, a daugh- 
ter of Jonathan Hodson. Their two children are ilrs. Alma N. Boiler, 
of Center to^^^lship, wife of Lee Boiler, and they have one daughter, 
Helen Louise: and Hazel, who was married November 12, 1913, to OUie 
Thurman. Mv. and Mrs. Thornburg are also rearing an orphan child, 
Oscar Wickum. In polities Mr. Thornburg allies himself with the Pro- 
hibitionists and he and his family worship with the Methodist church. 

Nixon Winslow. Llany lives have entered into the foundation of 
Grant county, and none of them more worthy to be considered in a 
history of pioneer personalities than the late Nixon Winslow, wdio for 
many years was prominent as a business man, farmer and banker and 
public spirited citizen in Fairmount township and city. 

Like many other of the early Grant county pioneers, Nixon Winslow 
was born in Randolph county, North Carolina, June 28, 1831. He died 
at his home in Fairmount City, May 25, 1910. His parents were Thomas 
and Martha (Bogue) Winslow. His father was born in Randolph county, 
July 14, 1795, and his wife in the same state on August 3, 1802. She 
was a daughter of John and Lydia (White) Bogue, who were married 
in 1797. John Bogue was a son of ilarmaduke and Sarah (Robinson) 
Bogue, who were natives of England, and w^io died at a good old age 
in Randolph county. North Carolina. They were what is known as Fox 
Quakers. John Bogue and wife Lydia died in Randolph county, North 
Carolina, when in the prime of life, leaving four daughters, all young. 
These daughters came north, were married, had large families, and 
were all identified with Grant county. The oldest of the daughters of 
John Bogue was Mary, better known as Polly, who married Phineas 
Henly, and lived and died in Grant county. Thomas and Martha Wins- 
low came to Grant county in 1836, entering land and living there until 



694 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

their death in Fairmount township. They were both Charter members 
of the Old Northern Quarterly Quaker Meeting in that township. 
Thomas Winslow and wife were married iu North Carolina about 1829, 
she being his second wife. His first wife who died in North Carolina 
was ^Millieent Gazan, who left four children at her death. 

The late Nixon "Winslow, who was the oldest child of his mother, 
Martha Bogue, was five j-ears old when the familj^ moved to Grant count.y, 
and here he grew up on his father's farm in Fairmount township. His 
education was obtained iu the local schools, and from the time he 
started out on his own account, he steadily prospered. He bought some 
land of his own two miles east of Fairmount city, and some yeai-s later 
bought one hundred and sixty acres just outside the city limits on the 
east, and on that land spent his final years. As already stated, he was 
one of the most successful farmers and able business men in the county. 
He was one of the organizers and for many years was president of the 
Citizens Exchange Bank of Fairmount, having sold his interest and 
retired from the office only a short time before his death. Among other 
public things to which he contributed his efforts and means was the 
Fairmount Academy, and also the Quakers church in the city. He 
served as trustee and elder of the church, holding the latter office at 
the time of his death. Though no politician in any sense he was a regu- 
lar supporter and voter for the Prohibition interests. 

In Jonesboro, in the Friends church and according to the strict 
forms of the Quaker ceremonies, the orthodox faith, Nixon "Winslow 
was married October 25, 1854, to Miss Cynthia Ann Jay. Her marriage 
introduces another interesting family into this biographical sketch. She 
was born in Miami county, Indiana, May 5, 18:^2, and when seventeen 
years old came to Mill township in Grant county. Her parents were 
Denny and Mary (Jones) Jay, her father a native of North Carolina, 
and her mother of Ohio. Her mother was a daughter of Elisha and 
Susanna (Hollingsworth) Jones, natives of Georgia, and early settlei-s 
in Ohio, where they located government land near Troy in Miami county. 
There Susanna Jones was killed by a stroke of lightning, while in the 
prime of her life. Her husband married the second time and continued 
to live in Miami county until his death at a good old age. Denny Jay 
and wife on coming to Grant county located on the ilississiuewa River, 
north of Jonesboro, where they had their home until their lives came 
to a peaceful close, his at the age of sixty-one and hers when sixty-three 
years old. They were active members, and both were elders in the Jones- 
boro Quaker IMeeting. In the Jay family were four sons and five daugh- 
ters, three of them being: Jesse and Lambert B., and IMrs. "Winslow. 
Jesse Jay is a farmer on the old Mill township homestead, is married and 
has a family, while his younger brother lives in Grant county, and is a 
genial bachelor, being a farmer by occupation. 

To the marriage of Nixon "Winslow and wife were born seven chil- 
dren, one of whom, Marcus Alden, died at the age of two and a half 
years. The living children who grew up are mentioned as follows : Le- 
vina, wife of John Kelsie, a prosperous farmer, and a former county 
commissioner living in Fairmount township, has a family of children. 
"Webster J is retired and lives in Fairmount, his first wife having been 
Mary Jean who died leaving children, of whom two are living ; his sec- 
ond marriage was to Ora Winslow. daughter of J. P. Winslow. and there 
were no children bv the second union. Ella, maiden lady, resides with 
her mother in Fairmount, and between the mother and daughter there 
exists a strong affection and many mutual sympathies, which render the 
declining days of Mrs. Winslow specially pleasant. Thomas D. is a 
farmer in Liberty township, and has twice married, his first wite being 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 695 

Eva Pearson, who left three children, of whom two are living, and his 
second wife is Anna Ellis, by whom there is one daughter. The next 
two children of the family are Ancil and Clinton, both of whom are given 
more specific mention elsewhere in these pages. 

Ancil Winslow, the youngest but one of the children of Nixon and 
Cynthia Winslow, was born in Fairmount township, December 29, 1864. 
He is deservedly regarded as one of the most enterprising and success- 
ful farmers and business men of Grant county. With the precedent of 
several generations of solid family success behind him, he has not failed 
to meet the expectations of family and friends, and among his asso- 
ciates is called a hustler, which very accurately described his character 
as a business man. 

Duriug his youth he was reared and trained in a good Christian 
home, and was taught the lessons of industry and honor. He was also 
a student in the local schools, and completed his education at Fairmount 
Academy. In 1889 Mr. Winslow bought one hundred and eighty acres 
of fine farm land on section seventeen of Fairmount township. There 
he later constructed in 1904, probably one of the handsomest and most 
comfortable rural residtnces to be found anywhere in Grant county. 
It is a thoroughly modern structure, and while built to harmonize with 
its surroundings and on the basis of utility, its is really as luxurious as 
many of the best city homes. The farm establishments ccnitain all the 
improvements that would be expected of the best Grant county home- 
steads, excellent barns, equipment of outbuildings and machinery of 
every kind, and the farm is well stocked with high grade cattle, hogs 
and horses. Mr. Winslow grows a great deal of alfalfa and feeds prac- 
tically every pound of the crops produced on the land to his stock. He 
uses a silo with a capacity of eighty tons. His success has lain especially 
along the line of stock raising and on his place he grows many varieties 
of fruit also. 

At Marion. JMr. Winslow married Ida Elliott, a daughter of Isaac 
and Mary (Small) Elliott. Her parents still live in Fairmount, and 
her father was born on the site now occupied by the Soldiers' Home of 
Grant county, the land having been entered by his father, direct from 
the government. Isaac Elliott and wife are hale and hearty old people, 
and both have been members of the Quaker faith since birth. Mrs. Ida 
Winslow is the only daughter and child of her parents. She graduated 
from the Marion high school and the Fairmount Academy, and is a 
woman of cultured tastes and an excellent homemaker. She is the mother 
of two children. Isaac R. was born June 7. 1893, graduated from Fair- 
mount Academj', and is now a student in Earlham College. Marcus R. 
was bom December 17, 1901, and is now attending the grade schools. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Winslow were born to membership in the Quaker 
church. 

Benj.vmin Franklin Van Vactor. A well known resident of Center 
township, Benjamin Franklin Van Vactor has been an important factor 
in agricultural circles of Grant county, and his popularity is well de- 
served, as in him are embraced the characteristics of an unbending in- 
tegrity, unabated energy, and an industry that never flags. While he 
has been an exceedingly busy man, with large personal interests, he 
has ever been public spirited, and is thoroughly interested in whatever 
tends to promote the moral, intellectual and material welfare of the 
community where he has resided all of his life. He was born on a farm 
about one" mile west of his present home, March 12. 1857, and is a son 
of Joseph and Margaret Burkel Van Vactor. 



696 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Joseph Van Vaetor was born in Holland, and on emigrating to the 
United States, settled in Ohio, where his first wife, a native of Prussia, 
died. After his second marriage he came to Center township. Grant 
countj-, Indiana, and took up a tract of eighty acres across from the Sol- 
diers' Home to the east, there continuing to reside until his death Sep- 
tember 10, 1867, at which time he was the owner of five hundred and 
eighty acres of land. Mr. Joseph Van Vaetor was a faithful member 
of the Methodist church, and took an active interest in its work, liberally 
supporting its various movements. He was the father of four chil- 
dren, all of whom are living at this time: Joseph, who is is engaged in 
farming in ^lonroe township ; Benjamin F.. of this review ; C. E., who 
was for twenty years cashier of the First National Bank of JMarion, and 
is now superintendent of the United States Glove Factory in that city : 
and j\Iary E., who married Roland Ratliff, principal of public schools 
of Danville, Illinois. 

Benjamin Franklin Van Vaetor was educated in the public schools 
of Center township, and was about eighteen years of age when he com- 
pleted his education and turned his entire attention to farming, in 
which he had been formerlj- engaged only during the summer months. 
Some six years later he was married and took up his residence about 
one-half mile east of his present home, and since that time has continued 
to add to his property, until he now owns two hundred and twenty-five 
acres. In addition he has a one-sixth interest in nine hundred and sixty 
acres of land in North Dakota. He is a skilled farmer, employing raocl- 
ern methods in his work, and securing excellent returns for the work he 
expends upon his property. His fellow citizens have recognized his 
general worth and the confidence and esteem in which he is held is evi- 
dence of the confidence he has inspired in those who know him. 

In 1881 ]\Ir. Van Vaetor was married to ]Miss Jennie Caldwell, who 
was born and reared iii Center township, where she secured her educa- 
tion in the public schools. Mrs. Van Vaetor is a daughter of Nicholas 
and Anna (Nelson) Caldwell. Nicholas Caldwell was a native of Vir- 
ginia, near Harpers Ferry, while his wife was born in Grant county, 
Indiana. Three children have been born to Mr. Van Vaetor and wife: 
Grace L., a graduate of the common schools, is now the wife of Burr 
VTolff, formerly of Center township, but now residing in ^Montana on a 
tract of three hundred and twenty acres of land, and they have five chil- 
dren — Faye Anna, Francis W., Ivan, "Wayen W., and Lavon C. Lea 
A., formerly a teacher of music, is now the wife of Claude J. Stout, 
living near Ambrose, North Dakota, and they have one child, Lena 
Audra. Leo C, a bright lad of ten years, is living at home and a student 
in the public schools. Mr. and ilrs. Van Vaetor are consistent members 
of the Griffin Chapel of the ^lethodist church. He is a Democrat in 
his political views, although not active, and his fraternal connection is 
with the F. M. B. A. 

Thomas J. Brookshire. No more estimable citizen may be found in 
Liberty township, nor no more capable and prospering farmer than 
Thomas J. Brookshire, who has been a resident of the state all his life and 
of Grant county since 1867. A veteran of the Civil war. his record is 
one of the highest honor and integrity, and he enjoys the unqualified 
esteem of the best people of his township, and wherever he is known. Ho 
was born in Henry county. Indiana, on November 26, 1844, the son of 
Emsley and Elizabeth (Shelley) Brookshire. The father was a native of 
North" Carolina, and the mother of Tennessee, both of whom came to 
Indiana in the early days of their lives. The father entered land in 
Henry county, and in addition to his farming acti^^ties, was widely 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 697 

known as an itinerant preacher of tlie Wesleyan faith. He lived and 
died on the laud he obtained from the government, there rearing a family 
of ten children, of whom two are yet living at this writing. Besides 
the subject, the only other survivor is Sarah A., who married Joshua 
Xuby of the state of California, and there resides. Three of their sons, 
among which was Thomas J. of this review, served in the Civil war. 

Thomas J. Brookshire was reared on the Heni-y county farm of his 
parents, and attended the district schools of his community. He was 
still very young when he enlisted in Company E of the Ninth Indiana 
Cavalry from Henry county, of which he was made first corporal, and 
he rendered a sei-vice approximating almost three years during the 
course of the war, the same being characterized by the most valiant action 
throughout. He was discharged in 1865, when the last gun had been 
fired, and the period of his service embraced some of the most exciting 
campaigns of the long civil conflict. He participated in the Vicksburg 
campaign and the Atlanta Campaign ; and fought in many of the most 
hotly contested battles of the war. Following his discharge he returned 
to the Henry county farm, devoting himself quietly to farm life. 

In 1866 he married Clementine Akers, of Rush county, Indiana, and 
to them were born ten children, six of whom are living at this writing. 
They are Leroy; Anna, the wife of John Dare; Jesse, living in ^Missouri; 
Cornelius, living near Hackelmau ; Nixon H., of Liberty township ; and 
Nettie, the wife of Leroy Saders. Sixteen grandchildren have been 
added to the progeny of the family, and one great-grandchild, James 
Frederick Smith. 

The year 1867 marked the removal of the family from Henry county 
to Grant county, and here he has a fine farm of two hundred and eighty 
acres in Liberty township. In the years that passed he has acquired 
title to a goodly bit of land in the county, at one time owning as high as 
five hundred acres. His present holdings, however, are sufficient for 
his demands, and here he is busy in the breeding of Percheron and Bel- 
gian horses, while the finest grade of shorthorn cattle may be found 
on his place. He has prospered all his days in his farming enterprise, 
and his neighbors know him for a successful man, as well as one of the 
most trustworthy men in the township, where he has a wide circle of 
stanch friends, as have the other members of his worthy family. He 
helped organize the Citizens Bank of Fairmount, was a director of the 
institution for several years and now a heavy stockholder and a director 
of the Fairmount State Bank. 

Mr. Brookshire is a member of the G. A. R., and has served the local 
post as commander at times. He and his family are members of the 
Wesleyan church at Backcreek, taking an active part in the varied enter- 
prises of that body, and in his politics Mr. Brookshire is a Progressive 
Republican. He is a man who ever manifests a good citizen 's interest in 
political affairs relative to his own community at least, and is now serv- 
ing on the Advisory Board of his township, where he has performed a 
valuable service for the town. He is known to be one of the progi-essive 
men of the county, not content to live in the past, but up and doing with 
the most advanced men of his community in both thought and action. 

George D. Lindsay. Although George D. Lindsay has lived in 
Marion, Indiana, for comparatively a few years only, he has come to 
be an important factor in the business life of the city and has taken a 
prominent part in its civic and political affairs. Mr. Lindsay is a law- 
yer by profession and in his position as part owner and manager of the 
Marion Chronicle, he has had much to do towards influencing the minds 
of the people. He is a man of splendid education and fine mental abil- 



698 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

ity and with the legal training and experience he has had he is extremely 
well fitted for the position which he holds. 

George D. Lindsay was born at ifcKeesport. Pennsylvania, on the 
30th of iMarc-h. 1862. He is the son of David G. and Janet (Nichol; 
Lindsay, both of whom were born in Scotland. They came to America 
in 1860 and settled at jMcKeesport, Pennsylvania, but some time after- 
wards settled on a farm in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, where 
they now reside. 

George D. Lindsay attended the public schools of ^IcKeesport and 
then took a business course in a Pittsburg business college. He later 
attended Washington-Jefferson College, at Washington, Pennsylvania, 
where he majored in history. He next became a student in Wooster 
College, at Wooster. Ohio, and upon leaving college he began life as a 
teacher. He was principal of the Belmont Academy at Belmont, Penn- 
sylvania, for some time and was superintendent of public instruction 
at Latrobe, Pennsylvania, for a year. He next read law in the office 
of Judge John S. Robb at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

In 1889 I\Ir. Lindsay graduated from the McCormiok Theological 
Seminary, Chicago, Illinois, and entered the ministry of the Presby- 
terian church. He held the pastorates in Ionia, Michigan, Galena, Illi- 
nois, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and Greensburg, Pennsylvania, and served as 
summer supply in man3' of the largest churches in the country, three 
times representing his presbj'tery as Commissioner to the General As- 
sembly. While in the ministry Mr. Lindsay frequently occupied the 
lecture platform, speaking in lecture courses, at school commencements 
and on special occasions such as Jlemorial Day, Fourth of July, etc. 

It was in 1907 that Mr. Lindsav came to !^Ia^ion. He here opened a 
law office and has been engaged in the practice of his profession ever 
since. In 1912 Mr. Lindsay bought an interest in the Marion Chron- 
icle and assumed the business management of it. He has not only made 
the paper a financial success, but he has also made it a power to Marion 
and Grant county. In addition to these interests Mr. Lindsay is general 
manager, secretary and treasurer of the Commercial Printing Company 
of Marion. ]\Iarion's largest job printing concern. 

He has been active in all matters pertaining to the civic improve- 
ment of ]Mai'ion and in the enforcement of the law, being one of tlie fac- 
tors in the fight for a clean city. He has been one of the leading men in 
the fight for local option, and in every movement that lias the progress 
of the cit.v as its aim he is found on the firing line. 

In 1889, on the 11th of July, ilr. Lindsay was married to Emma 
Breed, a daughter of Richard E. Breed, of Chicago. Five children were 
born to this union, Katharine, David, Jeannette, Sarah and Richard. 
Mr. Lindsay is a member of the Country and Golf Clubs of ilarion. 
In politics he is a member of the Repulilican party. 

Eleazar Newby. The Newby family, today one of the prominent 
and well thought of families of Grant county, has been identified with 
the county since 1830, in which year Thomas Newby. the father of 
Eleazar Newby, whose name introduces this review, came as a lad of 
six years to make his home with an uncle, who reared the oi-phaned 
child. The family has had a large and worthy part in the development 
and growth of the county and the communities that have represented 
the homes of the various members of the family in the passing years 
have benefited generously from the infiuences and activities of these 
men. 

One of the oldest American families extant, the Newbys have played 
a worthy part in the life of the country. They are descended from 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 699 

sturdy English stock, the first of the uaiue having located on these shores 
prior to the earliest struggles of the American colonies in their quest 
for independence, and men of the name have borne arms in the defence 
of whatever cause the eountiy has taken up from then down to the 
present time. A branch of the family in the eighteenth century set- 
tled in North Carolina, and from that branch have come the Newbys 
who have lent their powers to the upbuilding of Grant county. The 
first of the name who will be mentioned specifically in these columns is 
Eleazar Newby, graudsire of the subject, who bears the same name. He 
was born in North Carolina, and passed his life in that state. He died 
while yet in the prime of his manhood, being survived by his widow, 
who in her maiden days was Mary Winslow, of a fine old Carolina fam- 
ily. She bore him one son, Thomas W., who became the father of the 
subject, and after the death of her husband she married Daniel Thomas. 
They took up their residence in Fairmount township, where they passed 
their remaining years, and left one son, William Thomas. 

Thomas W. Newby was born in Randolph county, North Carolina, 
in 1824, and he was two years of age when his father died. He was 
taken into the home of liis uncle, Cajie Newby, and in 18.30 came with 
them to Grant county, Indiana. He was reared in his uncle's home and 
was brought up in the faith of the Quakers, his uncle being a stanch ad- 
herent of the faith and a powerful example to his fellow men all his 
days. Thomas W. Newby had in him those qualities that ever make for 
signal success and prosperity in the life of the man who possesses them. 
He devoted his life to agi'icultural activities, and was one of the few 
men of his day who amassed in the neighborhood of a million dol- 
lars. He gave to each of his six children an eighty-acre farm, well de- 
veloped and rich in improvement, as well as giving to each a large sum 
of money in cash. He was recognized as one of the foremost men of the 
county, as well as one of the richest of his time. He died at his old home 
in Fairmount township on December 7, 1903, when he was seventy-nine 
years of age. Mr. Newby was a Whig in earl.y life, and later became a 
Republican. He was a man of the most estimable qualities, and his ster- 
ling character made him an influence in his community tliat was far- 
reaching and beneficent at all times. In his citizenship he was a man 
among men, and his opinion in matters of civic duty and political Cjues- 
tions of all manner was one that was eagerly sought by his contempora- 
ries. When he died he was truly mourned and his loss is still felt in 
those places where he was best known. 

In Fairmount township, Mr. Newby married Sarah Hill, who was 
born in Randolph county. North Carolina, on December 7, 1824, and 
who was a daughter of Aaron and Nancy (Win,slow) Hill. They came 
as pioneers to Grant county and entered land in the vicinity of Back 
Creek church, where they passed the remainder of their lives. They 
were Quakers, and were stanch and sturdy folk, who won and retained 
the esteem of their fellow townspeople as long as they lived. They 
were among the founders of the Back Creek church of Friends, and 
were among the influential people of their community. Six children 
were born to Thomas and Sarah Newby, and they lived to see their off- 
spring filling worthy places in the town and county. Mrs. Newby died 
when she was eighty-six years and three months of age. and she too had 
been prominent in the church of the Friends. 

Eleazar Newby was the eldest of the six children born to Thomas 
and Sarah Newby, and of that number three are now deceased. He 
was born on the family homestead on June 15. 1851. He was educated 
in the public schools and early began to devote himself to the business of 
farming. In 1875 he took up his residence on his present fine farm of 



700 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

eighty acres in Section 7, ilill township, and that place has been brought 
to a state of etifieieucy that is second to none in the county today. In 
18SS he built his present commodious house on the place, having pre- 
viously, in 1883, reared ample barns for the needs of the farm. He is 
undeniably one of the most successful farming meu in the county. His 
place is known as Forest Home, a name especially fitted to the actuali- 
ties, for a magnificent grove of native forest trees adorns the grounds 
about tlie house. 

^Lr. Newby was married in 1881 in Jefferson township to Miss Celia 
Mitchener, who was born in this county and here has spent her life thus 
far. She is a daughter of Albert and Elizabeth JMitchener, natives of 
the state of Pennsylvania. They came to Grant county soon after their 
marriage and settled in Jefferson township, where they died in their 
old age. 

To ilr. and Mrs. Newby have been born six children concerning 
whom brief mention is here made as follows : Mary E. married Charles 
Pitt, and they live in North Jonesboro. They are the parents of Geneva, 
Lucile and James Pitt. Elsie is the wife of Edgar Neal. of Grant 
county, and their children are named Hildreth, Harold and Donald. 
Gertha M. and Adelphia I. are both unmarried and make their home 
with their parents ; while Jessie is the wife of Vergil Craig, and they 
also reside with the home folks. The joungest child, Clessie L., attends 
the public school. 

j\Ir. and ]Mrs. Newby were both reared in the Quaker religion, and 
have imparted to their children the sterling characters that have been 
their most marked qualities. They are members of the New Reformed 
Friends Church, somewhat recently brought into being through a reor- 
ganization, and Mr. Newb.y is a stanch Prohibitionist, and the power 
of his example has been one of the most potent influences for good that 
his community has felt in its citizenship. 

Garn Jett. One of the younger generation of farming men of Mill 
township is Garn Jett, who has, since locating in Grant county, devoted 
his entire time to general farming. Thus far he has enjoj-ed a reason- 
able measure of success, and he is ranked among the more solid and 
stable agricultural men of his township, ilr. Jett, however, is no mere 
tyro at the business of agriculture for he comes of an old Virginia fam- 
ily that for generations back have devoted themselves to the soil. His 
widowed mother even now maintains her residence on the fine family 
plantation of some four hundred acres, and members of the Jett family 
have in many instances proven themselves masters of the business. 

The Jett family is one that has for many years been established in 
Scott county, Virginia, and the first of the name who shall enter into 
this recital was John Jett, the paternal grandfather of Garn Jett of 
this review. All of John Jett's life was spent in Scott county and was 
devoted to farming. He came of one of the finest of Virginia families, 
and his life was one of singular completeness in his communitj'. A 
slave holder and a man of considerable wealth, he busied himself chiefly 
with the care of his magnificent plantation of 2.000 acres, and in the 
ante-bellum days he was indeed a power to be reckoned with in the 
agricultural activities of Scott county. He was bom in 1802, and died 
in 1877. after having sutfered heavy losses as a result of the Civil war, 
from which he never really recovered. 

John Jett married Irena Wolff, who was also born and reared in Scott 
county, and she survived her honored husband by some years, death 
claiming her on February 15, 1895, when she was just turned eighty 
years of age. She and her husband were both members of the Meth- 
odist church, South, and he was an ardent Democrat. 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 701 

Three sons were born to John and Irena Jett, — William, Stephen 
and John Jr. The two last named served in the Confederate army dur- 
ing the Civil war, and Stephen lost an arm while a Confederate soldier. 
He is now a resident of Boone count.y, Indiana, and has two sons. 
John Jett Jr. died in Scott county, leaving a widow and one daughter. 

"William Jett was born in Scott county on the old home plantation 
in 1852, and he died on January 14, 1910, when he was but fifty-eight 
years of age. He spent his entire life on the old home place, and in his 
native community was married, in early manhood, to Miss Susan Smith, 
a sister of Pascal Smith, a sketch of whose life appears elsewhere in this 
review. She, too, was a Scott county native, and all her life was 
passed within its confines. She was born in 1853, and is still living on 
the old homestead of 400 acres. Since the passing of the father, Wil- 
liam H. Jett, in 1910, I\Irs. Jett, with two younger sons, has had the 
care of the plantation and they have done justice to the task in hand. 

Seven children were born to William and Susan Jett, and of that 
number Garn Jett of this review is the eldest born. He was reared and 
educated in the home community, and when he was married in 1898 he 
was then just twenty-three years of age, his birth having having oc- 
curred on March 5, 1875. He married ^liss Catherine Smith, who was 
born on October 30, 1887, a daughter of John S. and Eliza (Pope) Smith, 
both now residents of Scott county, Virginia, where they have long made 
their home. They have devoted themselves to farming activities all 
their days, and are among the prominent people of their community. 

Soon after his marriage, Mv. Jett came to Grant county, and in 
1909 he purchased in Mill township a small place of seventy-eight 
acres, all of which is under cultivation, and which js in a high state of 
productiveness. Small grains and a quantity of clover comprise his 
crops, and the farm is well stocked and in every way reflects the enter- 
prise and ambition of its proprietor. 

Two daughters have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Jett, — Margaret 
born February 14, 1896, a freshman student in Fairmount Academy, 
and Irene, bom on May 25, 1898, and a student in the local public 
schools. 

Considering that Mr. Jett has only spent fifteen years in the county, 
he has gained a place of no little prominence therein, and is reckoned 
among the progressive and influential men of the town and county. He 
is a Democrat, and possesses qualities that make for a high degree of 
efficiency in citizenship, so that his influence in and about the com- 
munity is one of the finest order. He and his family have a host of 
good friends in their new home, and are well content with the results 
of their migration to the north. 

Clayton S. Wright. Success consists in a steady betterment of 
one's material conditions, and an increase of one's ability to render 
service to others. IMeasured by this standard, one of the exceptionally 
successful men of Liberty township is Clayton S. Wright, proprietor of 
the attractive and beautiful Beech Grove farm on section thirty-five. 
About thirty years ago, when he took the step which precipitates most 
young men "into the serious work of life, and causes them to measure 
their ability with awkward circumstances — got married — he had a small 
capital of about five hundred dollars. From that point his career has 
been one of steady growth to independence, until he is now justly con- 
sidered one of the most substantial men in liis township. At the same 
time he has accepted the many opportunities to show his good citizen- 
ship, and his work and influence has helped to make Liberty township a 
better place to live in. 



702 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

The birthplace of Mr. Wright was just three-quarters of a mile from 
where he now lives. He was boru there, February 13, 1860, Moses and 
Elizabeth (Hollingsworth) Wrigjit, his parents, both spent the latter 
years of their life on the old homestead in Liberty township. Moses 
Wright was a native of Tennessee, and was brought, when a boy, to Henry 
coiuity, Indiana, where he grew up, was married, and after a short time, 
about 1850. moved to Grant county, locating in Liberty township, on 
the estate where the son Clayton S. was born. They held membership 
in the Wesleyan church, but after the father's death the mother found 
a home in the Friends church. They were the parents of six children, 
only two of whom are now living, the brother of Clayton being Thomas C. 
Wright, a farmer in Wabash count}', Indiana. Catherine died at the 
age of fourteen ; Lydia, also deceased, became the wife of Clinton Moon ; 
Jacob, died when about thirty-five years of age, and Alpheus died at 
the age of twenty-two. 

Clayton S. Wright was reared on a farm, had a district school educa- 
tion, and lived the existence of the average farmer boy of Grant county, 
alternating between school in winter and farm work in summer. That 
was his bringing up until he was about nineteen years old, and he then 
gave his attention to the home place and woi'ked for his mother, until 
he was married. 

On March 4, 1882, Mr. Wright married Mary Harvey, who was bora 
.iust across the road from where they now reside. She was educated in 
the common schools. Mr. and Mrs. Wright are the parents of nine chil- 
dren : Harvey A., is a graduate of Fairmount Academy, of the Pacific 
College at Newberg, Oregon, and from Earlham College at Richmond, 
Indiana, and is now superintendent of the Grade and High School of 
Fountain City, Indiana. Adda E., who gi-aduated from Fairmount 
Academy and Earlham college, with the degree of A. B. has been a very 
successful teacher, and since 1910 has been a member of the faculty of 
the Fairmount Academy. Ora E., also a graduate of Earlham College, is 
superintendent of Friendsville Academy, at Friendsville, Tennessee. 
Vida, graduated from Fairmount Academy, and is a student of music. 
Mahlon M. graduated from the Academy at Faimiount. Lester B. is a 
student in the Fairmount Academy and Frank completed his course 
in the common schools in 1913, is now a student at the Fairmount Acad- 
emy. Ralph H., was born June 10, 1903, and Ruth E., the youngest, was 
born June 9, 1909. Great credit is due to Mr. and Mrs. Wright for 
their liberality and care in providing exceptional educational advan- 
tages for their children. The older ones are all college graduates, and 
are proving themselves worthy and useful and worthy members of the 
community. 

The Wright family have membership in the Friends church at Little 
Ridge in Liberty township. Mr. \Vright is one of the trustees of the 
Fairmount Monthly i\Ieeting, and is at the head of the local church. In 
politics he supports the Prohibition cause. His fine farm lies one mile 
south and three miles west of Fairmount, on the rural free delivery 
route No. 21. It comprises one hundred and forty acres of land, and 
has been brought to a high state of cultivation, and improvement. 

Albert R. Lazure. The United States Glass Company, which was 
organized as a corporation in 1891 with main offices at Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, established and began the operation of its plant at Gas City in 
1893, and this has ever since been one of the important industries of Grant 
county, and a very large contributing factor to the prosperity of the 
immediate locality. The president of the corporation is Marion G. 
Bryce, Ernest Nickel is secretary and treasurer, general factory man- 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 708 

ager is William M. Anderson, all these gentlemen being at Pittsburg. 
The Gas City plant is known as Factoiy U. The output consists of 
table glass ware, packers' goods, lamps and lantern globes, and special 
novelties and custom work. The plant at Gas City employs about three 
hundred and thirty people on the average, and its output in terms of 
weight amounts to about a million pounds each mouth. Besides other 
staple lines, they turn out a large amount of bar goods. The products 
are shipped all over the United States and for export to most civilized 
countries. 

The factory comprises a sixteen-pot furnace, and a continuous ten- 
ring tank, and some automatic machinery is employed. The local man- 
agers and officials are Albert R. Lazure, superintendent; D. J. McGrail, 
factory manager; Harry M. Kelly, sales manager; H. Taudte, manager 
of the mould department; J. C. Adams, manager of the shipping de- 
partment; H. P. Lazure, manager of selecting; A. F. Wiegel, night 
manager of the factory; James D. Denning, assistant factory manager. 

The Gas City plant was constructed during the winter of 1892-93, 
and began operations in May, 1893. The original reasons for establish- 
ing the plant here was of course the plentiful supply of natural gas. 
That was the fuel used until 1903, at which time the factory was equipped 
with gas producers, which have since been relied upon for the greater . 
part of the fuel. However, in the finishing department, fuel oil and 
natiiral gas are combined. The power plant consists of four one hun- 
dred and fifty horse-power boilers. This power is used in many wa.ys. for 
driving the electric generators, for producing compressed and volumn 
air, and in other ways. Volumn air is used not only for cooling the 
moulds, but is necessary to supply ample quantities of fresh and cool 
air in the work-rooms and about the fvirnaces. The factory has all 
facilities for sanitary conditions, and is regarded as a model in this 
respect by factory inspectors. 

The fundamental materials used for the production of glass are 
sand, soda ash. lime, and potash. To these are added in various combi- 
nations such chemicals as manganese, arsenic, and powder blue, special 
machinery being employed to mix these various ingredients. Two grades 
of glass are manufactured, and different mixing is recjuired for each. 
The pot furnace glass is the more expensive, and of the higher quality, 
being a glass of greater brilliancy and quality. In the pot furnace there 
are sixteen clay pots, each with a capacity of one and a half tons, and 
when each pot is filled with the ingredients, it is hermetically sealed, and 
is kept closed until the melting process is finished, at which time the 
seal is removed and the actual work of converting the molten mass into 
glassware is begun. This process requires about twenty-four hours for 
each pot. In the continuous tank are mixed and melted the materials 
for the cheaper grades of ware. This furnace receives the raw material 
from the rear, the fire coming in direct contact with the material, and 
the molten composition is drawn off from the front of the tank. The 
company also manufacture on its own grounds all the packing barrels 
aud cases used for shipping the ware, and this in itself is a considerable 
industry, since many thousands of barrels are manufactured each year. 

Mr. Lazure has been associated with the Gas City Plant since April, 
1893, before it began operations, and took charge as superintendent in 
October of the same year. Next oldest among the local officials is Mr. 
Denning, assistant factory manager, who has been connected with the 
business since 1894, and has held his present position since November, 
1913. Albert R. Lazure was born at Bellaire, Ohio, a noted center of 
glass industry, on December 13, 1869. After graduating from high 
school in 188'6. he at once accepted employment with W. A. Gorby of 



704 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

the Bellaire Goblet Compauy. In 1889 he went to Findlay, Ohio, did 
general otSce work there, and in 1892 took charge of the glass factory 
at Findlay, and continued until it was dismantled in January, 1893. 
During the following months he traveled in Canada and the United 
States, until locating permanently in Gas City. 

In 1901 Mr. Lazure was married in Jonesboro to Miss Daisy B. 
Bates, who was born and reared and educated at Jonesboro, and was 
for some time a student of music in the conservatory at Fort Wayne. 
They have one child, IMarjorie, three and a half years old. ilr. Lazure 
and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he 
is a trustee, and he served four years in the city council, and on Novem- 
ber 4, 1913, was reelected for another period of four years, being chair- 
man of the board. He affiliates with Jonesboro Lodge of Masons, with 
the Knight Templar Commandery at ]\Iarion and of the JIarion Lodge. 
B. P. 0. E. He is regarded as one of the leading men of Gas City, and 
having been identified with one of its most important industries since 
the beginning has filled a very useful place in the community. 

Albert Frank Seiberling. Probably one of the leading enterprises 
in its line in the world, the Indiana Rubber and Insulated "Wire Com- 
pany has been developed to its present large proportions by a group 
of progressive, energetic and enterprising business men, whose fortunes 
are connected with this industry, and who have prospered with its re- 
markable prosperity. Ever since its organization, during a period of 
more than twenty years, Albert Frank Seiberling has held a responsible 
position with this concern, and has contributed much to its growth and 
steady advancement. A man of foresight, judgment and modern ideas, 
in the capacities of assistant treasurer, member of the board of directors 
and general superintendent, he is assisting his associates to still further 
forward the company's interests, but at the same time has found leisure 
in which to help other public-spirited men in their activities for the 
puHic welfare, and in social life has become widely known in Jonesboro. 

Mr. Seiberling was born at Doylestown, Ohio, ilay 16, 1866. the third 
of the six children born to James H. Seiberling, president of the com- 
pany, a sketch of the family being found in the father's sketch on an- 
other page of this work. Mr. Seiberling was given good educational 
advantages, first attending the public and high schools of Doylestown 
and later attending Eastman's Business College, at Poughkeepsie. New 
York, where he received his diploma with the class of 1886. He received 
his introduction to business life with the Diamond Plate Glass Com- 
pany, of Kokomo, Indiana, of which his father was a director, and with 
which the son continued to be associated during a period of two years, 
between the time of leaving Eastman and going to Kokomo. Later he 
joined his father in the manufacture of farming machinery at Doyles- 
town, and continued there until 1891, when he helped to organize the 
Indiana Rubber and Insulated "Wire Company. At that time he was 
made secretary of the concern, but in 1892 became superintendent, and 
in that same year joined the board of directors. The superintendency 
of this large business carries with it a great load of responsibilities. 
There are 400 people employed in the plant, manufacturing approxi- 
mately $1,250,000 worth of goods annually, the product being automo- 
bile tires and inner tubes, a full line of rubber goods of all kinds, bi- 
cycle tires (about 1,000 per day fall and winter and 1.800 per day spring 
and summer) and insulated wire. The business was organized for the 
manufacture of the last-named product, but after three years began 
making rubber goods, and this has since become one of the most im- 
portant features of the trade. The company has the reputation of 



BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 705 

making goods that are unexcelled in quality, a reputation that is being 
steadfastly maintained. Every market of any size the world over car- 
ries a line of these Indiana goods, and the company has done nmch to 
spread the name and fame of Jonesboro as a manufacturing center. 
^Mr. Seiberliug is a man of energy and one able to achieve results. His 
associates rely upon him absolutely and he has never given them reason 
to regret their confidence. 

In 1892, not long after coming to Jonesboro, Mr. Seiberling was 
united iu marriage with Miss Angle B. Cline, who was born at Elwood, 
Indiana, July 30, 1S70, but who was reared and educated in Jonesboro. 
She is a daughter of Adam H. Cline, a business man of Jonesboro, and 
a stalwart citizen and supporter of the Republican party. Mrs. Cline, 
whose maiden name was Mary Thamburg, died in middle life, .Mrs. Sei- 
berliug at that time being twelve years of age. She was a devoted mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church and a capable. Christian woman. 
Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Seiberling, namely : Paul 
A., a graduate of the class of 1913, Marion High School, and now a 
student in Purdue University, where he is taking a course in chemical 
engineering; Mary Katharine, aged twelve years, who is attending the 
Jonesboro graded schools ; the oldest and youugest died in infancy. Mr. 
and ilrs. Seiberling are consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal 
eliurcli. and have been active in its various movements and charities. 
3Ir. Seiberling is a Republican in his political views, and, whUe he has 
not been an office seeker, has fulfilled the duties of citizenship as a mem- 
ber of the town board for thirteen years, and has been able to do much 
for his adopted locality. Fraternally he is popular as a member of 
the Masons, iu which he belongs to the Blue Lodge and Chapter at 
Jonesboro and the Commandery at Marion, and also holds membership 
in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the local lodge of the 
Knights of Pythias. 

John H. Waldeon has taken no inconsiderable part in the public 
affairs of Gas City, where for more than twenty-five years he has 
been identified with business affairs as a carpenter and contractor. 
It was his distinction to have been the first city treasurer elected after 
the incorporation of Gas City, and he served as a clerk of the old town 
board, and has twice been a member of the city council as aldei-man. In 
business he is one of the successful men, and is well known in the com- 
munity. 

Born in Adams county, Ohio, October 16, 1856, John H. Waldron 
came to Grant count}' when six years old. His mother, then a widow, 
located at Jalapa iu Pleasant township, where he grew up and learned 
the trade of carpenter under Stephen Sherman. With the exception of 
four years he has been in business on his own account, since he acquired 
the principals and details of the trade. 

Mr. Waldron is a sou of Elijah and Lydia (Ross) Waldron. His 
father was a native of Ohio, as was his wife, and they were married iu 
Adams county, locating on a farm on Brush Creek. He followed a com- 
bination of arming and coopering. A skilled mechanic, he did consid- 
erable business as a maker of tubs, and buckets and other woodenware. 
These wares were manufactured out of cedar. The father died in 
Adams county in 1861, when about thirty-six years of age, and left 
his widow with two sons, the other being Elijah A., who died iu 
Mill township of Grant county in 1909, when fifty-three years old, and un- 
married. The mother brought her children to Jalapa in Grant county in 
1861. Later she married, but had no children by her second union. Her 
death occurred in Japala in 1873, when forty-nine years old. She was a 
member and a regular attendant of the Methodist Protestant church. 

Vol. 11—17 



706 BLACKFORD AND GRANT COUNTIES 

Mr. J. H. Waldrou was married iu Pleasant township to Miss Lydia 
Grindle, who was born in Pleasant township in 1865, and was reared 
and educated there. She separated from her husband after the birth 
of two children, one of whom died in infancy, and the other is Lena 
Ethel, wife of WiUiam Scott, of Marion. Mr. and Mrs. Scott have no 
children. 

Mr. Waldron for his second wife was married in Union City, Indi- 
ana, to J\Irs. Delia Hoff. She was born in this state in April, 1859, was 
reared and educated here, and by her marriage to John Hoff has three 
living children : Earl, who is an electrical engineer at Fort Wayne, is 
married